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  1. #1
    -=Tawcan=- Guest

    Question Some questions about Linux

    Posted some questions earlier but now I have more specific questions after I read some stuff on Linux. I'm quite curious about Linux. Want to explore the new land. The only time I have used Linux (well Unix) is at my school's computer lab. I think it's an old version though.

    Anyway, I understand that there are difference versions of Linux. Like RedHat, Lindow. What are the difference? Do they all have the same Kernel and just different interface? Read somewhere Linux is heavy on command lines, is that so? Someone said you can use RedHat but use different interface is that correct?

    Howz the software compatibility with Linux? Can I use softwares that work in Windows? My main concerns are MSN messenger & netmeeting, ICQ, firewall, Office, programming programs, MP3, file downloading (Kazza, WinMX, etc), DVD, and benchmarks. Do I need to purchase new softwares if I want to switch to Linux?

    As you can see, I'm pretty much a newbie when it comes to Linux. Considering my new rig will be connected to a network and all the PC on the network will be using M$ OS, will this cause a problem?

    I'm pretty happy with XP, but it doesn't hurt to try something new. Educate me please.

  2. #2
    Joined
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    Different Linux distributions are besed on the same kernel and the same base software, but differ in details like the additional software, the exact versions of programs, default configuration options, and the installation and maintenance tools are usually distribution-specific. Use of command line interface is often necessary if you want to install software that isn't part of the distribution you are using. Red Hat allows choice between KDE and GNOME graphical user interfaces (and text-only interface).

    Some Windows software can be used under Linux with Wine, but you should really look for native Linux replacements for your programs. Normally you don't need to purchase new software, just download it for free.

    Linux works fine in a network with Windows machines, install Samba (usually included in your Linux distribution) to allow file and printer sharing services.

  3. #3
    -=Tawcan=- Guest
    Hmmm so basically if I want to use M$ products in Linux I will need to install those amulators then?

    How much room does Linux usually take up?

  4. #4
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    or you can use a substitute program. I like open office just as much as MS Office
    i code therefore i am

  5. #5
    Joined
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    Florida
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    Caught this thread while passing through and it caught my interest.

    Are most Linux apps compatible with Windows files? For example, you mentioned Open Office. Can I create/modofy/edit Word files and still have them saved in a Windows format for use at school? I understand there will be some differences, but for those times when I just have to have it, it'd be nice to be able to become more dependant on a Linux distro than M$.

    One more big issue: with my last experiment with Mandrake 8 last year, I was never able to access the NTFS partiion on my HD to be able to read all my data from XP (mp3s, documents, etc). I've heard about something able to view these files, but is there a way to physically move them over so I can use them all the time? I don't want to have to keep switching between Windows and Linux to gain access to them.

    As you can see, I'm trying to see if I can afford to make a more permanent move away from XP, but I might just have to dual boot again and deal with that hassle :-/

  6. #6
    Joined
    Nov 2001
    Location
    usa
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    589
    where is a good source to learn the linux commands? do commands differ with each distributor? or are the linux commands universal and dependant on the kernal?

    i am running red hat...still trying to obsorb all of this. maybee i should just invest in a book...like the redhat bible.
    ...maeham
    ---------------------


    you ask..."what's the purpose of life?"...
    "to screw, make babies, and if you can...get a boat" - (C) Mark Mendoza...my idiot friend

  7. #7
    Joined
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    I don't know what you did with your NTFS partition. As far as you "mount" them as "ntfs" and read-only, there's no trouble.

    Of course you need to have a linux install which includes the abiliity (module) to read ntfs files out of the box.

    That's out of the box for Mandrake and Suse, not sure with RedHat.

    The command in linux are universal, as linux is the OS, and 90% similar to Unix commands.

    You can read/write .doc, .xls files with Open Office.

    Anyway, I use M$ Office for high-end docs (Lots of styles in docs, and graphics in sheets) and the current Open Office version may have some troubles with them.

  8. #8
    Joined
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    Location
    Florida
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    Originally posted by OldFrog
    You can read/write .doc, .xls files with Open Office.

    Anyway, I use M$ Office for high-end docs (Lots of styles in docs, and graphics in sheets) and the current Open Office version may have some troubles with them.
    That's what I was looking for. I realize it may have some shortcomings, but even that's ok. I typically do standard formatting and nothing usually too far out there. Glad to hear I can still read/write the old files, though

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