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  1. #1
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    Microsoft Cites Software Piracy Hotspots

    By REUTERS

    Filed at 7:30 a.m. ET

    CYEBERJAYA, Malaysia (Reuters) - Microsoft Corp. said on Wednesday software piracy was on the rise worldwide and China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Malaysia and Indonesia were the ``hotspots'' in Asia where major counterfeiting activities thrived.

    Katharine Bostick, Microsoft's senior corporate attorney, said penalties imposed by many governments were not tough enough, resulting in the growth of large-scale manufacturing and distribution of counterfeit products.

    ``It involves organized crime,'' Bostick told a technology conference in Cyberjaya, Malaysia's software hub.

    ``When you are dealing with high-end counterfeits, you are talking about organizations that have a full supply chain, a full distribution chain, full manufacturing tools all in place, and it is all based on profits.''

    Bostick said data from watchdog body Business Software Alliance, in which Microsoft is a member, showed that the global piracy rate rose by one percent to 40 percent of software products sold in 2001.

    She said software firms stood to lose $11 billion in sales a year.

    ``Two out of five business software applications were pirated in 2001, which is the second consecutive year that the piracy rate has increased.''

    ``And again the focus on Asia is that, in Asia alone, the loss (of sales) is $4.7 billion.''

    Microsoft is the world's largest software maker, famous for its Windows program for personal computers, and rakes in sales of about $30 billion a year.

    STIFFER PENALTIES

    Bostick said Asia Pacific's piracy rate was 54 percent and rising in countries like India, Malaysia and Singapore.

    Vietnam scored the worst on the piracy meter, with a rate of 94 percent, followed by Indonesia at 88 and Thailand at 77.

    ``There could be many reasons why that rate is increasing but it is something that the software industry does look at.''

    Bostick said tougher enforcement and stiffer penalties were needed as counterfeiters were becoming more sophisticated, and software makers finding it increasingly difficult to stay ahead.

    ``Right now, the cost of violating intellectual property rights is not that high. There is really no penalty for that major person and they will be right back in business the next day or the next month,'' she said.

    ``At one time, they may have been doing drug trafficking which is highly profitable but there are huge penalties for that ... while you can do this stuff (counterfeiting) and make just as much money and the penalties are light or don't exist at all.''

    Bostick said governments should also work closely with the industry to create respect for intellectual property rights.

    ``Consumer desire for stolen goods, everyone loves a bargain ... education and awareness is very important,'' she said.

    ``The problem will not go away by itself. In five to 10 years, the problem will be massive.''


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  2. #2
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    I can get you a copy of Windows XP Pro, with SP1, and Office XP Pro with all service packs and updates, for under $5 here in Russia. Take me all of five minutes.

    My copies of XP Home and Office XP Standard, of course, are genuine, having winged their way from Amazon.co.uk right to my postbox. I also bought NAV2002 and Partition Magic.

    And as you can see from the freeware thread, I didn't need to buy anything else. There are free options out there just as good.

    I spent about $2000 on building this machine and damned if I was going to risk a dodgy operating system to save a measly few hundred dollars.

    I think it's often not that people can't afford software, but that they get a kick out of thinking they're getting away with something, especially where Microsoft is concerned.

    Did you ever think that if everyone had bought their OS, the unit price would go down to much more acceptable levels?

    J'bm

  3. #3
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    Did you ever think that if everyone had bought their OS, the unit price would go down to much more acceptable levels?

    ROTFLMAO!!!!

    Not a chance in H3LL !!!

    If that were true, they would lower their prices to thwart piracy.

    I use a few M$ apps that I have purchased and am happy with them, but M$ will never get a dime from me for WinXP until they drop WPA and remove the spyware crap...there are bigger issues at stake than just money when it comes to WinXP.
    Last edited by wdb1966; 10-23-2002 at 09:10 AM.

  4. #4
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    Originally posted by Jereboam
    Did you ever think that if everyone had bought their OS, the unit price would go down to much more acceptable levels?

    J'bm
    I don't think they would drop it a penny to be honest. I don't have any problem with Windows licensing rules, I just don't use it, but you have to keep in mind that I am sitting here running Linux as my operating system


    Main Box: BioStar TpowerX58 LGA 1366, Intel i7 920 Nehalem 2.66GHz Quad-Core, 3GB Corsair DDR3 1600, 2X250GB WD SATA, VisionTek Radeon 4870, Corsair 620w PS, Asus DRW-1608P3S & DRW-1814BL, Win7 SP1 & LinuxMint 10

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  5. #5
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    Re: Microsoft Cites Software Piracy Hotspots

    Originally posted by Palandri
    By REUTERS

    Filed at 7:30 a.m. ET

    CYEBERJAYA, Malaysia (Reuters) - Katharine Bostick, Microsoft's senior corporate attorney, said . . .

    . . .software firms stood to lose $11 billion in sales a year. . .

    In five to 10 years, the problem will be massive.'
    So I guess $11B a year is not massive by M$ standards, huh.

    I can't help but laugh, not because of her take on this but rather because her comments make this sound like it's relatively new. I was in Indonesia over 11 years ago. You could walk into a large (even by American standards) mall and find any number of stores selling software. Invariably the vast majority of the stuff was illegal by US standards.

    Three years ago a friend was flying home via Singapore. Same story then. The "Adobe everything" CDs, as I called them, had all the latest Adobe software packages rolled into two CDs complete with functioning product key IDs. Cost was $5 (don't recall if that was Singapore dollars or US dollars).

    My apologies Jereboam, but I don't think lowering prices for legit copies will make a lick of a difference in many places overseas. At least not unless by "lowering" you mean to the $5 level.

    For my part, I bought XP Pro and Office XP, but only because I could do so through a university for $25 and $35, respectively. If not for that deal, I wouldn't have built a dual-CPU system. I simply was not willing to spend as much for the O/S as I would for a couple of CPUs (and I haven't the time to even think about Linux).

  6. #6
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    Originally posted by Jereboam
    I can get you a copy of Windows XP Pro, with SP1, and Office XP Pro with all service packs and updates, for under $5 here in Russia. Take me all of five minutes.

    J'bm


    I can get all of those for the cost of a blank CD...

  7. #7
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    I bought my copy of Windows Xp, and I'd gladly buy a dozen more if I had the money or the reason. The product activation system is not a big deal at all. You buy a copy of the program, you get a CD key. Thats it. Its only $94 from Newegg..and for these people who spend $2000+ on their systems, or even $400 for just a video card, they talk about the cost like MS is asking you to donate blood or something. Its just $94. I've NEVER used a better operating system than Windows XP. I've tried various flavors of Linux only to be frustrated be the shear unecessary complexity and quirkiness of it. And there's only Mozilla browsers for Linux, which, pardon if you disagree, sucks. I have no trouble at all with MSIE, but every Netscape or equivalent browser I've ever used was slow, buggy, and annoyingly non-compliant with most of the websites I visited. I know I know..flame war..blah blah...you can disgree with me all you like, but if you ask me, this operating system is a bargain, and althought Office has its problems, I find it completely indispensable. Its also the case that we have no solid evidence of any "spyware" in Windows Xp. What would they want with our history files, usernames and such anyway?

  8. #8
    Joined
    May 2000
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    Originally posted by Duositex
    I bought my copy of Windows Xp, and I'd gladly buy a dozen more if I had the money or the reason. The product activation system is not a big deal at all. You buy a copy of the program, you get a CD key. Thats it. Its only $94 from Newegg..and for these people who spend $2000+ on their systems, or even $400 for just a video card, they talk about the cost like MS is asking you to donate blood or something. Its just $94. I've NEVER used a better operating system than Windows XP. I've tried various flavors of Linux only to be frustrated be the shear unecessary complexity and quirkiness of it. And there's only Mozilla browsers for Linux, which, pardon if you disagree, sucks. I have no trouble at all with MSIE, but every Netscape or equivalent browser I've ever used was slow, buggy, and annoyingly non-compliant with most of the websites I visited. I know I know..flame war..blah blah...you can disgree with me all you like, but if you ask me, this operating system is a bargain, and althought Office has its problems, I find it completely indispensable. Its also the case that we have no solid evidence of any "spyware" in Windows Xp. What would they want with our history files, usernames and such anyway?
    No flame war from me I think you stated what you think. Like you said $94 is a good deal if you want WinXP

    There are other browser available for Linux. Opera runs quite nice


    Main Box: BioStar TpowerX58 LGA 1366, Intel i7 920 Nehalem 2.66GHz Quad-Core, 3GB Corsair DDR3 1600, 2X250GB WD SATA, VisionTek Radeon 4870, Corsair 620w PS, Asus DRW-1608P3S & DRW-1814BL, Win7 SP1 & LinuxMint 10

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  9. #9
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    Ahhh Duositex - a kindred spirit. WPA was zero hassle, you're right. And I certainly haven't noticed anything untoward in my firewall logs.

    Archer77 - yeah but then add in the cost of your broadband connection...dialup isn't an option if you want to download OS's and office suites...

    Palandri - I love the idea of Linux. But (although I haven't much Linuxperience) there doesn't seem to be much to really pull me over yet. I have to say the latest Mandrake and Red Hat releases are starting to look good though.

    You can all do whatcha want at the end of the day. I prefer to purchase what I need, find free alternatives for the rest, and when Linux whips Windows I'll be the first to install it.

    J'bm

  10. #10
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    There you have it..empirical proof that Windows Xp hasn't been slipping anything past you. His firewall logs don't show anything funny. More than I can say for some other applications. Oh but wait! Anti-microsoft Conspiracy theorists unite! They must be in bed with alllll of the software companies too so that Windows Xp can hide its spyware traffic too right?

  11. #11
    Joined
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    Originally posted by Jereboam
    Did you ever think that if everyone had bought their OS, the unit price would go down to much more acceptable levels?

    J'bm
    Nope. Not at all. It'd have to be the other way around: If the price first went down then the people would be inclinded to by their OS's. The first move is Microsoft's. Because no one is foolish enough to believe that if the world moves first Microsoft will reciprocate.
    Last edited by eobard; 10-23-2002 at 02:07 PM.

  12. #12
    Joined
    Aug 2002
    Location
    San Jose, California
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    Talking

    ``It involves organized crime,'' Bostick told a technology conference in Cyberjaya, Malaysia's software hub.

    ``When you are dealing with high-end counterfeits, you are talking about organizations that have a full supply chain, a full distribution chain, full manufacturing tools all in place, and it is all based on profits.''

    I thought she was talking about Micro$oft when she mentioned organized crime. You know how to define crime: monopoly and price fixing and forcing customers to pay in advance for upgrades they may never need.

    Myself, I am building a system just for Linux this weekend. Then I am going to start trying different releases to see which one comes close to being easy to use. Note that all my systems are W2K and not XP.
    A7N8X Dlx with Barton XP 2500 @ 2.2Mhz
    512 Muskin 222 PC2100
    nVidia GeForce4 Ti4600 w/128MB
    Plextor PX-708A

    A7V333 2.0 with Thorton 2K at 2Mhz
    1 GB no-name PC3200, slot 1 & slot 3
    ATI AIW 8500DV 64MB

    Win2K Pro, SP4

    The ultimate cooling guide thread

  13. #13
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    Theorem:

    If Microsoft had not designed the Windows Operating system, the world would be two decades behind where it is today.

    Discuss.

    Personally..I'm too grateful not to give them a little cash. You think every classroom would have unix systems in it by now? Hell no. We'd all be using chalk and library books still. Without Windows, the world would not be what it is today. Microsoft Windows is THE operating system. Not "an" operating system. When you're all very old, and you look back in history, you're not going to remember build 123.434x66 of linux which spawned the information age. You'll remember Windows 3.11 or Windows 95, and Microsoft Internet Explorer. Linux is for everyone who thinks there's a better way, and knows there might be a better way, but refuses to admit that they can't come up with it.

  14. #14
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    Renod:

    The world worked fine on 14.4 modems and AOL right? And DOS was perfect the way it was...after all, who needs a damn GUI? When new products came out to replace either of those, their "need" was questioned by people very much like yourself. Sure they might not be necessary, but I bet you'd fight the armies of Persia and Rome if someone told you you had to go back. If someone said to me that I had to put Windows 98 on this machine, I'd cry. Regression sucks a lot more than progression. Think about it like that and maybe you'll appreciate the "unecessary upgrades" a bit more.

  15. #15
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    Originally posted by Jereboam


    Archer77 - yeah but then add in the cost of your broadband connection...dialup isn't an option if you want to download OS's and office suites...

    J'bm

    although I do have broadband, the cost isn't a factor as I know a dozen people who would burn me copies of any OSs and office suites I should desire free of charge, and there are those who would do it for a small fee as well.

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