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  1. #16
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    only 4 atoms per transistor gate? wow, i cant even believe that they have the manufacturing processes to get that kind of accuracy.

    sopclod: good old tubes. the days where all 100,000 or so had to work just to add a couple of numbers... good stuff


    Trust me, I do science
    My Hardware, Past and Present

  2. #17
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    I would imagine that PC components will become more intergrated over time. Now, you have CPU, mobo, and memory all in seperate components. Perhaps memory and the CPU will become one, as things get smaller, and cost considerations come into play.

    Food for thought..

  3. #18
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    Originally posted by danny5
    I would imagine that PC components will become more intergrated over time. Now, you have CPU, mobo, and memory all in seperate components. Perhaps memory and the CPU will become one, as things get smaller, and cost considerations come into play.

    Food for thought..
    That would go along with PC's getting smaller. What if everything used the same connection, something like the SATA connectors (size-wise)? Having smaller copper traces would have obvious advantages as well.
    -soplcod

  4. #19
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    ChaosEngine: prescotts will still be p4's. Intel wont call em p5's until nehalem(sp)

  5. #20
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    Originally posted by danny5
    I would imagine that PC components will become more intergrated over time. Now, you have CPU, mobo, and memory all in seperate components. Perhaps memory and the CPU will become one, as things get smaller, and cost considerations come into play.

    Food for thought..
    The Opteron/A64, pretty much has the northbridge on the die.
    That's a good move IMO.

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  6. #21
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    Originally posted by sanford1
    The Opteron/A64, pretty much has the northbridge on the die.
    That's a good move IMO.
    Yes, but what will it do to people who want to build there own computers? It will become harder.

  7. #22
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    Not really. If anything having a NB as part of the CPU should increase speed.

    You'll still need a mobo, but the design will be taken out of the hands of all the mobo manufacturers, and in the hands of AMD. I think that in the long run this will be a better solution.

    I am sure that Asus, MSI, and etc will still be needed to put everything together. But you may not have that VIA/Nvidia/SIS option.

  8. #23
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    157
    Originally posted by Slides
    Yes, but what will it do to people who want to build there own computers? It will become harder.
    It's actually easier for the manufacturers to design a motherboard with the Opteron because there is no Northbridge, all they need to do is integrate the Southbridge into the motherboard. One downside to integrating a memory controller on the CPU die is that the CPU becomes tied down to a specific type of memory. In this case the memory controller in Opteron only recognizes DDR memory and when DDR II debuts that would mean that on-die memory controller would have to be disabled and a Northbrige would take over. (Smells of Intel's MTH w/ Rambus and all to me but it's been reported that the on-die memory controller can be disabled.)

  9. #24
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    yea "sopclod" is right if you look at the scales of transisters per chip it always increases and its called "someguys weird name scale" but they predict very shortly the technoligy will get to the size and the vibration of elections will effect calculations then computers will be crap and thats why they need to start working on new technology ASAP such as quatum computing

  10. #25
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    Quantum Computers!!!

    A couple of you guys were arguing about quantum computers in the marketplace. I'm just gonna put that argument to rest and SHOW you one of the articles dealing with the reasearch being done on quantum computers.

    ...THIS IS REALLY REALLY REALLY KEWL!!!
    Sorry, I cant post a link to this seeing as I don't have a Website, or FTP.


    ARTICLE ONE:



    Scientists simulate quantum computer
    Researchers use nuclear magnetic resonance in experiment

    MSNBC STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS


    June 25Researchers say they have programmed a prototype
    quantum computer that can only count as high as four, but is able to simulate the weird world of quantum mechanics better than a traditional computer. The research could eventually lead to a new breed of computers that can do tasks far beyond the reach of today?s machines. DAVID G. CORY of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Raymond Laflamme of Los Alamos National Laboratory and colleagues report that have come up with a general scheme for quantum simulation that would work on any quantum computer. In a paper in the June 28 issue of Physical Review Letters, the researchers say they demonstrated the scheme on a liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance quantum computer developed at MIT. What we?ve had this quantum computer demonstrate the dynamics of harmonic and anharmonic oscillators is very simple. A firstyear quantum mechanics student could do it on paper. But this is probably the first reachable
    application of information processing on a quantum system, said
    ChingHua Tseng, an MIT postdoctoral associate on the nuclear engineering research team and coauthor of the paper. The other authors are Shyamal Somaroo and Timothy F. Havel of Harvard Medical School.
    The possible applications of quantum computing techniques have been studied since the 1980s. But the field took off in earnest only in 1994, when AT&T mathematician Peter Shor discovered that quantum computing could efficiently find the prime factors of large numbers. Such prime factorization could provide a method for cracking some of the most widely used methods for encrypting sensitive data. Around the same time, Seth Lloyd, associate professor of mechanical engineering at MIT, proposed that a quantum computer could be built from an array of coupled twostate quantum systems, each of which can store
    one quantum bit, or qubit.
    Cory?s research group, and Neil Gershenfeld and colleagues in MIT?s Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, with Isaac Chuang at IBM, independently helped develop the quantum computer.

    HUGE POTENTIAL
    At the moment, quantum computers don?t possess the
    calculating power of a pocket calculator. But quantum computing has the potential to surpass conventional computing techniques in power and efficiency. Because quantum mechanics allows a quantum computer?s components to represent many states
    simultaneously, it should be able to perform many computations
    simultaneously.
    A quantum computer may be able to solve quickly problems involving weather prediction and fluid flow problems so big they couldn?t be stored in a conventional computer?s memory.
    The power of quantum computers is astronomical. If you took every molecule of water on the Earth and used it to build a classical computer all you need are 86 qubits, and you have a quantum computer that is more powerful than this theoretical classical computer, Cory said. A 40qubit quantum
    computer cannot be simulated by even the largest computers in the world.
    Given that a quantum computer is based on something that
    physics allows and that there are such compelling reasons why we want it, I am certain that we will find the technology to make it, Cory said. Don?t ask me to predict how it will happen, because there are very important challenges to face. This has not been
    handed to us on a platter.

    The idea behind quantum computing
    Theoretically, a quantum computer could be fashioned out of
    anything. Any physical system is by definition a quantum mechanical system. The challenge is to isolate and manipulate the system to function as a computer. The potential foundations for quantum computing systems include such things as photons,
    electrons in semiconductor structures, superconducting devices and cold, trapped ions.
    Cory, Tseng and their colleagues are among a handful of
    researchers using nuclear magnetic resonance, or NMR, to experiment with qubits. NMR techniques are widely used to study the structure of molecules and to image internal structures within the human body. NMR allows scientists to manipulate the atomic spins of nuclei by applying an electromagnetic pulse to molecules diluted in a liquid. Sending a pulse for a specific amount of time
    generates a known signal. The signal is amplified by the molecules
    acting in parallel. Researchers can control the spin of the liquid molecules, in effect telling the computer to perform a mathematical function and arrive at an answer. In this case, the computer simulates a quantum mechanical system by carefully
    forcing its qubits to evolve like another quantum system.

    OBSTACLES REMAIN
    The main obstacle to constructing a practical quantum
    computer is control: the difficulty of engineering the quantum states required; the phenomenon of the tendency for a quantum system to lose its coherence through interactions with the environment; and the difficulty of reading out the result of a quantum calculation.

    In the face of such challenges, researchers are unsure
    whether a quantum computer can be efficiently scaled up beyond a prototype. Tseng pointed out that the MIT researchers took the realistic route of creating a quantum information processor, a machine tailored toward a specific purpose, rather than
    attempting a fullfledged general computer capable of a variety of uses. Even primitive quantum computing helps scientists better
    understand underlying physical principles of quantum mechanics and, in turn, use what is physically possible to inspire new avenues in computer science.
    Simulating the behavior of quantum mechanics is a useful research tool because if you can calculate the behavior of a system you can?t normally calculate, you can find out more about its behavior and structure and do research on that, Tseng said.
    The research was supported by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. MIT and AScribe contributed to this report.

    A quantum leap in computing
    Physicists make a quantum leap
    Einstein said it couldn't be done
    Discuss weird physics on the Mysteries of the Universe BBS
    Encarta Concise Encyclopedia: Quantum Theory
    Centre for Quantum Computation
    AT&T Labs: Peter Shor's Home Page
    Visual Quantum Mechanics
    Surprise 97: A Brief History of Quantum Computing
    Scientific American: Quantum Computing With Molecules

  11. #26
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  12. #27
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    uhh...lemme look

    Let me see If I can find them. They were originally on the MSNBC site, so I'll go check it out. BRB

  13. #28
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  14. #29
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    umm yea ok, and you can just go to IBM's site and they have one of the first working Quantum computers with 8 qubits, and this was like over a year ago.

  15. #30
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    What's your point?

    umm yea ok, why does it matter that IBM did 8 qubits over a year ago? What is the relevance of your post? Im just posting links cause they were asked for. You see, info doesn't mean anything if people don't know about it. So, umm yea ok, here are some links for those of us that aren't up to speed on the whole quantum computers thing. Sorry if I inconvienced you by making you read my post, next time I'll try to be more careful. LOL.

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