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  1. #1
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    BIOS Information, links to specific BIOS, Flashing your BIOS

    Walton Chaintech still has many new BIOS versions and drivers: Links to all Chaintech boards BIOS and DRIVERS


    NOTE: Most all the links below are broken, but will remain for a period still, out of respectful memory!
    SK8T800:

    BIOS Download Page


    Version : 1.0 (SV810426) SV810426
    Date: 2004/04/26
    Note : FOR VIA 1617A AUDIO CHIPS

    Version : 2.0 (SV810322) SV810322
    Date: 2004/03/22
    Note : FOR C-MEDIA CMI9761A AUDIO CHIPS
    Feature : 1. Fixed the CN23B Front USB(6&7) USB Mouse/Keyboard not function problem under DOS
    2. Fixed the PS2 mouse S3 and S4 problem under WinME

    Version : 2.0 (SV81908) SV81908
    Date: 2004/09/08
    Note : FOR VIA 1617A AUDIO CHIPS
    Feature :Support Sempron CPU

    Version : 3.0 (SV810A08) SV810A08
    Date: 2004/10/08
    Note :FOR C-MEDIA CMI9761A AUDIO CHIPS
    Feature :Support AMD Sempron CPU

    VNF3-250:

    BIOS Download Page


    Official BIOS dated 4-29-2004 (VN120308) VN120308

    These are not official BIOS's, use at your own risk. They are hosted by one of our members

    (VN120507 with EZ Flash) VN120507

    (VN120430 with EZ Flash) VN120430

    (VN120729) Support AMD Sempron CPU (zipped with Award Flash) VN120729

    (VN120921) Version 3 VN120921
    1.Support AMD Sempron CPU.
    2.Fixed two DDR 400(DIMM1-2 or DIMM1-3) show DDR333 , when using K8 3000+ CPU
    3.Added "Hard Disk Boot Priority" function in Advanced BIOS features.


    ZNF3-150:

    BIOS Download Page


    Version 1: (ZNF30A03) ZNF30A03

    Version 2: (ZNF810322) SV810322
    Ver. 2 was removed from Chaintechusa's site because when you update to it, using a RAID array, it kills the OS installation. Ver. 3 corrects this problem.

    OR: (ZNF31219) ZNF31219

    Version 3: (ZNF30C19) ZNF30C19

    Latest Version (ZNF30302) ZNF30302
    30302 has not been tested in the US yet and therefore has not yet been released. Use at your own risk!

    Version : 4.0 (ZNF30315) ZNF30315
    Feature : Fixed the Max Memclock can't set to 133 or 166 when using DDR400 issue (DDR400 FSB is locked on 400)

    Version: 5 (?) This version is from the Korean site!
    Dated: 07/30/2004 ZNF30730


    ZNF3-250:

    BIOS Download Page


    Original BIOS dated 1/16/04 (ZN120116) ZN120116

    Latest Version dated 7/15 With Multipliers enabled (ZN120715 ) ZN120715

    Version : 3.0 Date: 2004/09/07 (ZN120907) ZN120907
    Feature :Support AMD Sempron CPU

    VNF4 ULTRA

    BIOS Download Page


    Original BIOS Version : 1.0 dated 5/21/2004 (VN210C29) VN210C29 from US site OR VN210C29 from Taiwan site

    BETA BIOS Use at your own risk!
    Beta 0117 dated 1/17/2005 (VN210117) VN210117 from US site OR VN210117 from Taiwan site
    Note : Solved some issues noted below:
    Feature :
    1.S4 can not get back to winxp.
    2.win2000 installation issue.
    3.add 1T2T of memory setting.
    4.overclocking possibility issue.

    BETA BIOS Use at your own risk!
    Beta 0117 dated 1/17/2005 (VN210126) Beta 0126 dated 1/26/2005 VN210126 from US site OR VN210126 from Taiwan site
    Note : For use with the new version of nTune

    Version : 2.0 dated 2/3/2005 (VN210203) VN210203 from US site OR VN210203 from Taiwan site
    Feature :Support nTune software.


    Version : 3.0 dated 3/15/2005 (VN210315) VN210315 from US site OR VN210315 from Taiwan site
    Feature : 1.Added CPU Cooler & System Fan automatic control function.

    BETA BIOS Use at your own risk!
    Beta_o518 dated 5/18/2005 (VN210518) Beta 0126 dated 1/26/2005 VN210518 from US site OR VN210518 from Taiwan site
    Feature :Support Dual Core CPU.

    Version : 4.0 dated 4/27/2005 (VN210427) VN210427 from US site OR VN210427 from Taiwan site
    Feature : 1.Fixed that "Memory Voltage" and "CPU Vcore" display error
    2.Fixed that "CPU Voltage Regulator(1.475V~1.550V)" function failed
    3.Fixed that CPU over colck 256MHz display error 4.Added "Home Key" function

    Version : 5.0 dated 6/03/2005 (VN210603) VN210603 from US site OR VN210603 from Taiwan site
    Feature : 1.Update Award code base
    2.Support AMD DualCore CPU

    Special thread for method of flashing BFG BIOS to VNF4 ULTRA board!
    http://forums.pcper.com/editpost.php...post&p=3793496
    Special thanks to ClaudeB. !!

    S1689

    BIOS Download Page


    Version : 2.0 dated 1/13/2005 (SU810113) SU810113 from US site OR SU810113 from Taiwan site
    Feature :1. Support Cool'n Quiet function.
    2. Fixed that use AGP or PCI VGA card run 3Dmark03 fail.

    Version : 3.0 dated 1/27/2005 (SU810127) SU810127 from Taiwan site
    Feature : Fixed SA6600GT AGP run 3DMark will cause system restart.


    Version : Beta 0523 dated 5/23/2005 (SU180532) SU180532 from US site
    Feature : Support Dual Core CPU.

    Version : 4.0 dated 7/14/2005 (SU810714) SU810714 from US site OR SU810714 from Taiwan site
    Feature : 1.Support Dual core CPU
    2.Support 4G DDR400 memory at WINXP64/Server 2003

    Version : V7.0 dated 8/1/2005 (SU810801)
    Date: 2005/8/1
    SU810801 from US site OR SU810801 from Taiwan site
    Feature : Support new Sempron CPU
    Last edited by UncleBob; 07-20-2008 at 06:36 PM.

  2. #2
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    POST codes for the AWARD BIOS

    POST codes for the AWARD BIOS used in the NForce3 & 4 chipsets.
    Last edited by UncleBob; 06-04-2005 at 10:26 PM.

  3. #3
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    Need help Flashing your BIOS?

    Need help Flashing your BIOS?

    "What is the BIOS, anyway?"
    Simply put: the BIOS is:
    BIOS means Basic Input Output System. BIOS is actually firmware, the software that is programmed into a ROM (Read-Only Memory) chip built onto the motherboard of a computer. BIOS is what makes the system run an initial Power-On Self-Test of the computer, initialize circuits, load the boot program from the boot disk, and then handle low-level I/O to peripheral controllers such as keyboard and display.
    For more in depth information, look to BIOS Central for a more in depth explanation. It's a well maintained and very helpful site.

    Why would you flash your BIOS?
    Frequently a motherboard is manufactured with a BIOS that meets the specs and/or needs of the user at point of manufacture. With the race to be first to market with new Chipsets and features, software engineers work on a specific motherboard's BIOS is never done. As bugs become apparent or features are discovered that can be added, new versions of a motherboards BIOS are written and made available. A manufacturer who sincerely listens and works hard to respond to it's users requests will often have many BIOS versions for one single version of a motherboard. This allows us (the users) to experiment with different BIOS versions till we can find one that has the right combination that will perhaps give us an edge in performance or stability. As new hardware becomes available to market during the run of a motherboards life, new BIOS versions become available that greatly increase the usefulness of a motherboard.
    So in summary here, are some legitimate reasons one would find the need to flash a new BIOS:
    1) Better performance (We all want more speed, right?)
    2) Make use of new hardware (That newest video card just isn't recognized at POST without a new BIOS)
    3) More operating options (This can bee anything; overclocking options of memory timings, unlocking CPU multipliers, etc.)
    4) Enhanced hardware monitoring capabilities (Providing auto shutoff via on die temp monitoring, monitoring fan speeds, etc.)
    5) Specific changes that provide solutions from incompatibility of hardware (Faster memory, etc.)

    So, are you ready to flash your BIOS?
    Well, first of all, I'll add a simple disclaimer, OK? Flashing your BIOS can result in a motherboard that will not function at all. How could this happen? Examples are: incorrect version applied, incomplete flash or degeneration of BIOS data during flash are but a few experiences that await us. In the end, if you aren't sure you need to flash your BIOS....DON'T!
    If none of this scares you, (I didn't think it would!) let's get down to the basics of it shall we?

    How to flash a BIOS successfully
    Not so long ago, to flash a BIOS, you simply put a BIOS on a self booting floppy and typed in the correct codes in DOS and kinda prayed to the BIOS chip God that all would be well. It's important to remember that in flashing your BIOS, you are essentially deleting your existing BIOS information from the BIOS chip and replacing it with the version stored on the floppy disk. This method has and continues to be a great way to accomplish a successful BIOS flash. Some drawbacks are:
    1) Floppies fail
    2) Any disruption of the flash process results in a bad flash from which there isn't often a recovery. (You gotta dead Dell, dood!)
    3) Any information not correct for your BIOS chip that is inadvertently flashed will often go undetected until reboot where you are confronted with a BSOD!
    4) Lack of understanding of basic DOS commands hampers the ability to flash correctly.
    5) Floppies fail...really they do!
    That being said, perhaps you ask...."Enough BS, UncleBob.....get to the point here already!"
    Before I go there, here are several hints that will help:

    1) ALWAYS FLASH YOUR BIOS WITH THE MOTHERBOARD BIOS AT SAFE OR DEFAULT SETTINGS. ATTEMPTING TO FLASH WHILE OVERCLOCKING CAN RESULT IN A FROZEN FLASH AND MOTHERBOARD FAILURE.
    2) SELECT "CLEAR CMOS" OPTION TO INSURE A SUCCESSFUL FLASH. IT HAS THE SAME EFFECT AS RESETTING THE JUMPER ON YOUR MOTHERBOARD. YOU JUST GET TO KEEP YOUR HANDS OUT OF THE CASE.

    Let me introduce a friend of mine:.....WinFlash is a utility that enables a successful BIOS flash to be done safely and quickly from Windows without the problems associated with floppies, DOS or other related uncertainties..

    How to use Win flash
    Click on pics to open full size in new window.
    First of all Download Win Flash into a new folder where it can stay unmolested on your hard drive. I simply put a folder on my desktop entitled "WINFLASH" ThenI download the zipped 451kb file into the folder.

    Select to unzip at present location and you will get a folder labeled "Award"

    Open the folder and here we see the needed files:

    Let's read the instructions, shall we? (I know, I hardly ever read the instructions first, so don't tell, OK?)
    I can't believe it's so simple!
    Please copy Win Flash.exe and Win flash.sys on the HDD and run Win Flash.exe to flash BIOS.
    You can now, if you wish, put the folder "WIN FLASH" with all 4 unzipped files in it in your Program File folder to get it off your desktop if you wish. Me? I like cleanliness and detest clutter so it goes in a special folder on my Program Files called Win Flash Utilities. Just remember where you put it, OK? You can then select to place a shortcut to Win flash Exe. on your desktop. When you have the folder placed correctly, make sure you put the BIOS files in the "AWARD" Folder as that's the default location WinFlash looks for them.

    Hey, we are halfway there! Now you will want to make another folder where you will download a BIOS file for your motherboard. Here's where it gets a little tricky, but don't panic! Make sure you know the proper version of your motherboard as well as product code, serial number, etc. Flashing the incorrect BIOS can make your board inoperable! Win Flash does a great job of policing your actions but it isn't completely foolproof.
    So now, we have Win Flash installed and a fresh hot off the programmers keyboard BIOS downloaded in a safe place and we are ready.
    Select the Win Flash EXE Icon you placed on the desktop and here appears a screen:

    If you see this, you are on the right track! Notice the menu items on the top left: Select "File / Open" and find the BIOS file you wish to upload.

    If your file is unsupported, don't worry. You cannot flash an incorrect BIOS. WinFlash will send you back with an error message. So, find the correct file. I usually put BIOS files in a special folder. They must have a .bin extension to be valid. You cannot flash any other type of file. You can view your current BIOS chip information by selecting "View/ BIOS info"

    After selecting the file, you are ready to flash. You get one chance to "back out" if you aren't sure....just select "QUIT" and take a step back if you are unsure. Nothing has happened yet, not to worry.You can choose which options you want to update. You should always select "Clear CMOS". Select which sections of the BIOS you want to update. According to the BIOS version already on your chip, some or all of the sections will be available. If they aren't available, WinFlash won't let you select it, it's that simple. Rarely will you want to flash the BootBlock Section, so deselect that.

    If you are in fact ready, simply select "UPDATE" and Win Flash does the rest. During this process, you will see the program perform 3 functions: "Erasing Main Block, Programming Main Block and Verifying Main Block" It is imperative that you do not stop the process anywhere during these steps. To do so will make your chip useless. The good news is, as long as you don't reboot, you can reflash without problems!
    Upon completion, Win Flash will ask you if you wish to reboot. Select "YES"

    You have just flashed your BIOS from Windows and are well on your way to enjoying a fresh new BIOS with all the corrections, enhancements, etc. it came with.
    Last edited by UncleBob; 06-29-2005 at 11:12 PM.

  4. #4
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    Chaintech BIOS And Links

    I want to personally thank GadgetBuilder for his time and effort to help us with this tutorial. He singlehandedly wrote this and pursed getting it here!

    This is the first section, other sections are in separate posts below.


    The following pertains to flashing a Phoenix-Award BIOS on the Chaintech VNF4 but the info here may be helpful with other Award BIOS mobo's too.


    What is BIOS?

    BIOS means Basic Input Output System. BIOS is actually firmware -- it is programmed into a flash type PROM (Programmable Read-Only Memory) chip located on the motherboard of a computer. BIOS is the program that runs first at power up -- BIOS detects the hardware configuration, runs the initial Power-On Self-Test (POST) of the computer, initializes circuits, loads the boot program from the boot disk, and handles low-level I/O to peripheral controllers such as keyboard and display to allow the user to adjust settings.

    The BIOS is stored in a flash PROM so that it can be updated (re-flashed) if the need arises. Mobo manufacturers are very careful when programming the BIOS so flashing to repair programming errors is uncommon. More common is flashing to add new features, e.g. fan speed control based on temperature or additional memory settings.

    "If it ain't broke don't fix it" applies to BIOS flashing. Flashing BIOS should not be undertaken lightly. BIOS is a key part of the mobo and if the flash is not successful then the result is usually a dead system. Only flash BIOS if it will provide a needed new feature or will fix a problem known to affect your mobo.

    Flashing generally goes smoothly, assuming you update with the correct BIOS version for your mobo. However, things can go awry so the recovery from a Bad Flash is covered in some detail below; you can skip all this and go directly to "Flashing an Award BIOS with WinFlash", just remember that recovery is covered here if you need it. It is worthwhile to scan the section detailing reasons a bad flash might occur so you know what to watch for.


    What is Flash Memory and How Does it Hold BIOS?

    A PROM is a Programmable Read Only Memory (An oxy-moron because it clearly isn't read only). Flash memory differs from older type EPROM in that it can be erased and rewritten without removing it from the circuit. The flash used to store BIOS is typically erasable in 64kbyte blocks; it is writable on a byte by byte basis.

    One common configuration for BIOS storage is a flash memory with 8 blocks of 64kbytes each for a total of 512kb. With this setup, one 64kb block is normally dedicated as a "Boot Block" and holds a special recovery program which can read a BIOS off of floppy and store it in flash. The other 7 blocks of 64kb hold the actual BIOS (often in compressed form). Thus, it is important to NOT write the Boot Block when updating BIOS since if a "Bad Flash" occurs the Boot Block recovery mechanism would likely be lost.


    What Causes a Bad-Flash?

    Some common reasons for a bad flash are:

    1) Improper procedure for flashing
    2) Bad floppy diskette or drive
    3) Overclock while flashing
    4) Wrong BIOS for mobo
    5) Power fail while flashing


    Recovering from a Bad-Flash

    Because a bad-flash can disable your mobo (and ruin your day) it is prudent to have a bad-flash recovery procedure before flashing. Mobo manufacturers provide a default bad-flash recovery scheme which will recover most problems but it requires some prior setup (or after-the-bad-flash access to another computer) to produce a recovery floppy.

    This default recovery procedure relies on the BIOS "Boot Block" area remaining intact through the bad-flash; the Boot Block is usually unscathed by a bad-flash so if a recover disk has been accurately prepared before attempting to flash then recovery is accomplished by inserting the recovery floppy and booting the system; the BIOS should be restored in a couple of minutes. If the Boot Block area of BIOS was damaged in the bad-flash you're stuck... The details of preparing a recovery disk using AMDflash are described here: http://www.biosflash.com/e/bios-update-howto.htm

    Note that after a bad flash it is unlikely that video will work so the recovery floppy should have a batch file that executes and flashes BIOS automatically when it is booted. Mark this floppy carefully and keep it in a safe place -- it WILL flash your BIOS if you boot with it in the floppy drive.

    Lots more info about using AWDflash: http://www.cybertechhelp.com/html/tu...rial.php/id/65

    An alternative designed to allow recovering from a bad flash quickly is "BIOS Savior", a hardware gadget which installs in the BIOS socket. The existing BIOS chip is inserted into the BIOS Savior. A switch is used to select the original BIOS chip or a second flash chip inside the unit. This internal flash can be programmed with a copy of the BIOS so that flipping the switch and rebooting gets the system back up and allows re-trying the flash without disturbing the good copy of BIOS. Cost runs $16 to $30 or so delivered in the USA. Google "Bios Savior" for details and/or see: http://www.ioss.com.tw/eg/ The Chaintech VNF4 uses a SST 49LF004A/3.3V PROM; the BIOS Savior model RD1-8X is advertised as compatible with this but I was unable to flash its internal Intel 82802AB PROM in the VNF4 with any flash software (and I tried several). Best guess at present is that the VNF4 needs the later model BIOS Savior, RD1-PMC4, even though the IOSS compatibility guide indicates either will work.

    Two further alternatives to recover from a bad-flash are hot-flashing or purchasing a new BIOS chip from the mobo manufacturer or one of the organizations which specializes in supplying these chips -- use Google to find what you need if you go this route after a bad-flash.

    The ultimate recovery mechanism for a bad flash is a PROM programmer - this is how the BIOS is originally written at the factory. These programmers were very expensive but the Enhanced Universal Willem EPROM Programmer is available for about $50 on eBay; some models are designed to handle the common types of BIOS flash chips. (Haven't tried this so can't say how well it works.)
    Last edited by UncleBob; 08-12-2005 at 12:53 PM.

  5. #5
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    Re: BIOS Information, links to specific BIOS, Flashing your BIOS

    Flashing an Award BIOS using WinFlash

    Get copies of WinFlash and AWDflash if needed: http://support.octek.com.au/FAQ/faq_0002.htm

    WinFlash flashes the BIOS under Windows (rather than DOS) from a file stored on the hard disk. This avoids the first two problems listed as common reasons for a bad flash but the other reasons remain, so make a recovery disk using AWDflash. WinFlash can help to make a recovery disk by writing a file containing the BIOS currently in the flash PROM (A BIOS which you know works) in case you don't have this already.

    When WinFlash is unzipped it will normally be in a new folder called "AWARD". By default WinFlash will look in the folder it is run from for BIOS bin files to load so it is convenient to place these bin files in this folder.

    A "How to Use WinFlash" pdf is included with the program but it doesn't answer some of the questions a first time user might have. WinFlash Help doesn't help, but the WinFlash program works well anyway. To some extent it is all magic -- including the BIOS itself -- because the whole flash process isn't well documented.

    Prior to running WinFlash, locate a copy of the BIOS bin file you intend to flash and copy it to the folder which holds WinFlash. Be absolutely certain it is the correct BIOS for the mobo -- using a wrong BIOS is one of the common ways to disable a mobo and require a bad-flash recovery. When a new BIOS becomes available consider waiting until others have proven its worth; generally, BIOS changes add minor new features so only in special situations is it worth the (possible) trouble to be first kid on the block with the new BIOS.

    Ensure that your machine is not over-clocked while flashing. This may require entering BIOS and making appropriate adjustments. Also ensure that: Flash BIOS Protection - disabled, System BIOS Cacheable - disabled are selected in BIOS.

    Prior to running WinFlash shut down all non-essential applications to avoid any conflict with WinFlash.

    ###################################
    NOTE: WinFlash expects to flash your BIOS and then restart your system. WinFlash v1.75 has a BUG which affects your system if you exit WinFlash without flashing BIOS: WinFlash will appear to shut down but will actually continue to run and will consume considerable CPU -- use Task Manager to shut it down. If you start WinFlash multiple times then there will be multiple instances running in the background (Don't flash with multiple instances of Winflash running).
    ###################################

    Run WinFlash and, if needed, make a backup file for use on your recovery floppy ( File/Save old BIOS). Complete building (or updating) the recovery diskette before proceeding to flash with WinFlash.



    This graphic shows the setup of Winflash with options selected for a normal flash session (with hints in red). Note that: 1) the Boot Block is NOT selected, 2) DMI is selected, 3) Clear CMOS is selected. Also note that the graphic of the flash memory in the center of the screen shows the Boot Block in green and the remainder in blue. If you have placed the bin file in the folder with WinFlash, then pressing the "GO button" will allow selection of that bin file followed by an option to "Flash/Quit".

    Winflash is nicely behaved in that you can test various things right up to flashing and then avoid flashing at the last instant; this allows the new user to become familiar with its operation without wreaking havoc.

    Flashing with WinFlash takes 1 to 2 minutes on the VNF4 -- as shown via a progress bar.

    On completion of flashing, WinFlash reads the BIOS back and verifies that it was written accurately. If the read data does not match then it outputs: "Flash Block Verify Error". The point is that then new BIOS will be written correctly or the program will notify you of the problem.


    Don't write the Boot Block unless required for a specific BIOS revision; as explained above, leaving the Boot Block as-is provides the default bad-flash recovery. (There are questions about whether WinFlash will write the Boot Block regardless... this isn't easily and safely verified by mere mortals).


    Reboot after flashing. Enter BIOS and make any needed adjustments. Expect the very first boot after flashing to take longer than subsequent boots as BIOS probes the system for the hardware configuration and stores this info in CMOS.

    It seems simple and it is if all goes normally (as it usually does). The recovery procedures discussed above provide a measure of security should something go awry.




    About BIOS as seen in WinFlash


    Based on several hours research on the net, the basic BIOS setup (as seen from WinFlash) is:

    The Boot Block area holds a small program able to boot off floppy. In addition, the unpacker for the Main area resides in the Boot Block. It is hard to say whether the Boot Block area can actually be re-written; some sources indicate it is permanent, others say it can be written, others say it can be written if a jumper is set properly or a BIOS switch is set. Probably depends on the mobo so there may be different setups on different boards. Best to avoid attempting to write to the Boot Block area. Some details about Boot Block Flash: http://download.micron.com/pdf/technotes/FT01.pdf

    The key is the Main block. This holds the real BIOS code, probably in packed form.

    Always clear CMOS when changing to a new BIOS. The old data may be at a different address than the new BIOS expects and may be min-interpreted because of this causing strange, possibly serious, problems.

    Best guess is DMI and ESCD are actually areas of CMOS (not flash) which get filled in automatically on the first boot. They hold info describing the hardware configuration to speed up subsequent boots after the first.


    DMI = DeskTop Management Interface

    ESCD = External System Configuration Data -- During the first boot after writing a new BIOS the PnP devices are located and the pertinent info is stored in CMOS to speed future boots.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    WinFlash Error Messages

    "BIOS ID error" " Are you sure to program"
    Generally, this means you are about to write the wrong version of BIOS to your board and it may well disable your board. Be certain you know what you are doing if you go forward from here.

    "Flash Block Verify error"
    The flash operation was not successful. Possibly the exiting BIOS was not disturbed or you may have a bad-flash; try booting and see what happens.
    --------------------------------------------------------
    AWDflash Error Messages

    "Unknown Flash Type"


    ======================
    Typical AWDflash command line:

    Awdflash.exe VN210427.bin /cks9d20 /cc /cd /cp /r /py

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Links on flashing:

    This link has the latest versions of AWDflash and Winflash:
    http://support.octek.com.au/FAQ/faq_0002.htm
    Main Rig: EVGA 141-BL-E769-A1 LGA 1366 Intel X58 CLASSIFIED/WATERCOOLED ED. cooled by the Monster Water Cooling Setup
    HTPC One BIG Case Asus 8 CORE Monster
    ASUS: 5 * BIOSTAR: 1 * CHAINTECH: 1 * EVGA: 3 * GIGABYTE: 5 * SUPER MICRO: 1 *TYAN: 2
    180+ GHZ total power for PC Perspective Killer Frogs Rosetta @ Home Team as The Uncle B's!!




    Spoiler!

    I'm the Uncle your Aunt won't talk about. Go ahead and pull my finger!

  6. #6
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    Re: BIOS Information, links to specific BIOS, Flashing your BIOS

    Older Chaintech BIOS And Links

    7NJS Zenith NVIDIA nForce2 SPP + MCP-T Chipset

    12/12/2002 BIOS

    11/18/2002 BIOS

    02/24/03 BIOS

    03/26/03 BIOS

    04/14/03 BIOS

    06/12/03 BIOS


    7VJL Apogee Deluxe VIA KT400 Chipset

    9/26/2002 BIOS


    7VJL Apogee VIA KT333 Chipset

    8/21/2002 BIOS

    6/20/2002 BIOS


    7VJDA VIA KT266A Chipset

    8/28/2002 BIOS


    7KJD AMD 761 Chipset

    9/25/2002 BIOS


    Chaintech Websites

    Taiwan

    Korea

    United States


    Thiz Linux

    Chaintech Linux Distribution
    Last edited by UncleBob; 11-16-2005 at 10:55 PM.
    Main Rig: EVGA 141-BL-E769-A1 LGA 1366 Intel X58 CLASSIFIED/WATERCOOLED ED. cooled by the Monster Water Cooling Setup
    HTPC One BIG Case Asus 8 CORE Monster
    ASUS: 5 * BIOSTAR: 1 * CHAINTECH: 1 * EVGA: 3 * GIGABYTE: 5 * SUPER MICRO: 1 *TYAN: 2
    180+ GHZ total power for PC Perspective Killer Frogs Rosetta @ Home Team as The Uncle B's!!




    Spoiler!

    I'm the Uncle your Aunt won't talk about. Go ahead and pull my finger!

  7. #7
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    Age
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    HOWTO: Help! I have no floppy drive, how do I make a USB Memory device DOS bootable!!

    Updated version available here.

    First, you need to set your system's BIOS so that you can boot from the device in question. In order for this to happen the USB Memory Device must be in the boot order list before the harddisk if you expect to boot from it.

    On later(newer) BIOSes you may have an option to press the ESC key before booting, and selecting the device to boot from. The USB Memory Device will appear in this list after it has had a boot sector written to it.

    Next, you will need software that will write a boot block to the USB Memory Device. On some machines, this can be done with standard partitioning tools (fdisk or others). I have yet to own a machine that could do this, and I have not personally met anyone who has, but the Internet is full of anecdotal reports of this working.

    I have found two successful methods of writing a Boot Block to a USB Memory Device, they are the HP Disk Storage Format Tool, and the MakeBootFat command line utility. The MakeBootFat command line utility is documented in a second post, following this one.

    Method 1: Using the HP Disk Storage Format Tool

    The simplest method of all is to get a copy of the Compaq/HP USB Disk Storage Format Tool, contained in SP27213.exe . The HP website lists this service pack, but I've never been able to download it from their FTP server. A quick google search will probably locate a source for you, but if you have problems, I last located SP27213.exe from THIS URL.

    After unpacking, installing, and executing this tool, it will write a hard disk style boot block (MBR) to your USB Memory Device, and the USB Memory Device will appear as a harddrive when booted.

    The HP utility does need a source for the PC/MS/DR/Open DOS boot files (dos.sys/msdos.sys io.sys and command.com) there are many sources for these files, you may have a win9x/me boot CD, cab files or other sources available to you.

    If no pc/ms/dr/opendos files are available to you, try BOOTDISK.COM for a Windows 98se boot disk (Try this link if you have trouble with the first) , and the Virtual Floppy Disk Utility to mount image files as a drive, and allow read/write access to the contents.

    The end result of running the HP Utility is that your USB Memory Device will be formatted (so back up your data), it will have a harddrive style MBR written to it. It will also have the three necessary boot files copied to it. This USB Memory Device will now boot as a harddrive, appear as a USB hardrive, and, when booted from, will appear as drive C:.

    If this is unacceptable to you, or not compatible with your BIOS, then you will need to use the Makebootfat utility documented in the second post.

    Step by Step instructions for the HP Disk Storage Format Tool.

    Step 1: Download the necessary utilities/files

    http://www.docjelly.com/Blog/content/binary/SP27213.exe
    http://chitchat.at.infoseek.co.jp/vm...d21-050404.zip
    http://www.dehning.com/download/util...sks/boot98.exe or http://1gighost.net/ohioman/win98sc.zip

    Step 2: Extract and install the necessary utilities/files

    Install the SP27213.exe file somewhere ( say c:\utility\drivekey\ )
    Extract the vfd21-050404.zip somewhere ( say c:\utility\VFD\ )
    Extract the boot98.exe file using a WinRar or maybe another zip utility. This archive will give you an error when extracted with winrar, but the image file inside (winb98.ima) will extract. If extracting this fails, use the boot98sc.zip file (It's not a standard win98se boot disk image). Either way, put the resulting winb98.ima or win98se.img file somewhere ( say c:\utility\VFD\ )

    Step 3: Prepare and Format the USB-MD.

    Insert the USB Memory Device into a USB socket (if not already installed), do not use a HUB.

    Run the VFD Control Panel (c:\utility\VFD\vfdwin.exe)

    The VFD Control Panel will start on the device driver tab, press the [install] and [start] buttons. Switch to the drive 0 tab, and press the [drive letter] button, and select something other then A or B as a mount point. On my system, drive K is the next available drive (Neither Drive A nor B works with the HP Utility on my system).

    Now, you will press the [open] button, and point the VFD Control Panel to either the WINB98.IMA or the WIN98SEC.IMG image file and click the new [open] button.

    You now have the MSDOS boot/system files available on a new drive.

    Now that the prep-work is done, you can actually do something to your USB Memory Device.

    Start the HP USB Disk Storage Format Tool (from the start menu).

    Your USB Memory Device should be visible on the top most drop down menu (if not, look for it, if it still does not show up, your USB Device may be incompatible with booting or this utility).
    Select FAT or FAT32 as your file system, Fat32 may be preferable for large memory devices, FAT may be preferred if you are going for maximum compatibility (example: you want to use the device with Printers, Cameras, etc).
    Optionally, you may give your USB-MD a Volume Label.
    Click the ''Quick Format'' check box.
    Click the ''Create DOS Startup Disk'' check box.
    Select the ''Using DOS System Files Located at:'' radio button.
    Point the HP Utility to the virtual floppy drive (K: in my system) using the [...] button below the ''Using DOS System Files Located at:'' radio button.
    Click the [Start] button.

    You should recive a confirmation message that your USB Memory Device was formatted, open it and verify that command.com, (MS)dos.sys and io.sys are present.

    Close the HP USB Disk Storage Format Tool.

    Go to the VFD Control Panel and on the drive 0 tab, press the [close] button, next go the the driver tab and press the [stop] and [uninstall] button, and exit the VFD Control Panel.

    You are done partitioning and formatting your USB Memory Device. Transfer what ever additional data you need to the device (Award Flash and a BIOS Image for example), edit the config.sys and autoexec.bat is necessary and reboot your machine.

    Your computer SHOULD now boot from the USB Memory Device.


    I hope post this helps someone.

    Paul Driver.
    Last edited by UncleBob; 05-28-2006 at 05:35 PM.
    Main Rig: EVGA 141-BL-E769-A1 LGA 1366 Intel X58 CLASSIFIED/WATERCOOLED ED. cooled by the Monster Water Cooling Setup
    HTPC One BIG Case Asus 8 CORE Monster
    ASUS: 5 * BIOSTAR: 1 * CHAINTECH: 1 * EVGA: 3 * GIGABYTE: 5 * SUPER MICRO: 1 *TYAN: 2
    180+ GHZ total power for PC Perspective Killer Frogs Rosetta @ Home Team as The Uncle B's!!




    Spoiler!

    I'm the Uncle your Aunt won't talk about. Go ahead and pull my finger!

  8. #8
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    HOWTO: Help! I have no floppy drive, how do I make a USB Memory device DOS bootable!!

    Method 2: Using the MakeBootFat Utility

    makebootfat is a command line tool, but it does allow a good deal more flexibility then the HP Tool. For example makebootfat will allow you to write a Linux image to a USB Memory Device. Makebootfat will require some of the same tools used with the HP utility, and to make a USB Memory Device dos bootable and emulate a USB Floppy Drive ( a USB Zip/LS120 Drive to be exact) you really only need the command line makebootfat.exe -v -o usb -m mbrfat.bin -b winb98.ima k:\ (where k:\ is the location of the dos source files).


    Step by Step instructions for the MakeBootFat utility.

    Step 1: Download the necessary utilities/files

    http://prdownloads.sourceforge.net/a...m.zip?download
    http://chitchat.at.infoseek.co.jp/vm...d21-050404.zip
    http://www.dehning.com/download/util...sks/boot98.exe or http://1gighost.net/ohioman/win98sc.zip

    Step 2: Extract and install the necessary utilities/files

    Extract the makebootfat-1.4-windows-pentium.zip file somewhere ( say c:\utility\makebootfat\ )
    Extract the vfd21-050404.zip somewhere ( say c:\utility\VFD\ )
    Extract the boot98.exe file using a WinRar or maybe another zip utility. This archive will give you an error when extracted with winrar, but the image file inside (winb98.ima) will extract. If extracting this fails, use the boot98sc.zip file (It's not a standard win98se boot disk image). Either way, put the resulting winb98.ima or win98se.img file somewhere ( say c:\utility\MakeBootFat\ )

    Step 3: Prepare and Format the USB-MD.

    Insert the USB Memory Device into a USB socket (if not already installed), do not use a HUB.

    Run the VFD Control Panel (c:\utility\VFD\vfdwin.exe)

    The VFD Control Panel will start on the device driver tab, press the [install] and [start] buttons. Switch to the drive 0 tab, and press the [drive letter] button, and select something other then A or B as a mount point. On my system, drive K is the next available drive (Neither Drive A nor B works with the HP Utility on my system).

    Now, you will press the [open] button, and point the VFD Control Panel to either the WINB98.IMA or the WIN98SEC.IMG image file and click the new [open] button.

    You now the MSDOS boot/system files available on a new drive.

    Now that the prep-work is done, you can actually do something to your USB Memory Device.

    Open a Command Line Interface (CLI) Window (cmd.exe for NT based machines, or command.com for Win9x/ME)

    Change directory to the place where makebootfat is located (cd \utility\makebootfat)
    Execute the following command makebootfat.exe -v -o usb -m mbrfat.bin -b winb98.ima k:\ where win98.ima contains the full path to the DOS image file, and K:\ is the location where the DOS Image file is mounted.

    After entering the command line and pressing Enter you will get either the help message (which means that makebootfat has updated it's command line switches, or you typed something wrong), or you will get a format completed or format failed message. If the format fails, your USB Memory Device may not be bootable.

    Close the CLI Window (type exit)

    Go to the VFD Control Panel and on the drive 0 tab, press the [close] button, next go the the driver tab and press the [stop] and [uninstall] button, and exit the VFD Control Panel.

    You are done partitioning and formatting your USB Memory Device. Transfer what ever additional data you need to the device (Award Flash and a BIOS Image for example), edit the config.sys and autoexec.bat is necessary and reboot your machine.

    You computer SHOULD boot from the USB Memory device, if it boots as a C:, you may want to try the -Z (make bootfat is case sensitive) switch, this will write a ZIP style partition table to the device, but when this is done, some machines will not boot from the stick any longer.


    I hope this helps someone

    Paul Driver
    Main Rig: EVGA 141-BL-E769-A1 LGA 1366 Intel X58 CLASSIFIED/WATERCOOLED ED. cooled by the Monster Water Cooling Setup
    HTPC One BIG Case Asus 8 CORE Monster
    ASUS: 5 * BIOSTAR: 1 * CHAINTECH: 1 * EVGA: 3 * GIGABYTE: 5 * SUPER MICRO: 1 *TYAN: 2
    180+ GHZ total power for PC Perspective Killer Frogs Rosetta @ Home Team as The Uncle B's!!




    Spoiler!

    I'm the Uncle your Aunt won't talk about. Go ahead and pull my finger!

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