Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Joined
    Jan 2003
    Location
    State College, PA
    Posts
    674

    damn people afraid of change!

    ugh, where to begin?

    i'm sitting in my basement at 3AM because my boss insists i use the file server at work for all shared devices.

    that's fine for the most part, but i just got done ripping apart the printer he uses for card stock (which was never installed on the file server) and now that i managed to fix it, he wants it on the file server.

    thing is the file server uses red hat 8 and i stay away from it as much as possible. it's set up to use samba because no one else has to use linux. (just lucky me )

    so i grabbed the redhat box from my desk and brought it home and threw it on a spare machine figuring if he's gonna make me learn, he can pay me to do it at home with doom3 to distract me form the frustrations.

    now, i took unix courses in school, (but that was a pathetic example of an institution) so i can navigate around and vi the stuff i need to. say like editing smb.conf is no prob to add another user. dead simple stuff like that just bothers me because win2k or xp could easily do what needs done.

    so here's my problem, i've decided i need to learn how to use linux, despite the prevalent belief that it'll take me about a decade to reach an effective administrative level. i'd like to stay with red hat as that's what i'll be using at work, but i've had exposure to mandrake and solaris (not the same, i know) so i am not afraid to try another distro.

    so where does one begin learning about this stuff? i'd like to be proficient in the following well within 6 months:

    installing and configuring hardware.
    installing and configuring software packages for typical small office functions.
    troubleshooting the above.
    obviously, the use and configuration of samba. though i got a good book on that to read.
    mail servers
    ssh access

    and lastly, databases. this has always been my achilles. even in windows, i cannot for the life of me understand databases and relationships. database normalization is like klingon to me - only the most devoted geeks in our world could have devised such a thing and then decided they'd use it, too.

    any helpful tips are greatly appreciated. now i'm off to vent on some zombies.

    P.S.

    for the love of the gods, please, *DO NOT* reccommend dual booting. i don't need that complication to the learning process. i have enough machines in my basement to run half a dozen different distros without touching my windows machines.
    ...and so it came to pass that the countess, who once bathed in the rejuvenating blood of a hundred virgins, was buried alive...

  2. #2
    Joined
    Jul 2001
    Location
    UK
    Age
    51
    Posts
    20,229

    Re: damn people afraid of change!

    First off, welcome to the Linux forum!

    RH8 is a little long in the tooth now, version 9 was the last version before it changed to Fedora (currently at version 3, with 4 due to be released shortly). The main advantage of newer versions is better hardware support for new hardware, the latest kernel etc.

    The first thing I'll do is recommend a book to you:

    Red Hat Linux Bible (Christopher Negus, published Wiley)

    You might be able to find the old version 9 book cheap. It's an excellent book, suitable for new users and old timers alike (makes a good reference), and covers most of the basics very well.

    The native package management software for installing apps in RH is RPM. If you're comfortable with the command line, you don't really need much else. If you want gui, try Synaptic with apt.

    SSH comes as standard and is easy to configure, unless you're talking tunneling connections over it.

    I'm afraid I can't really offer any advice on mail servers or databases - not my area, but if you have any specific questions then I'm sure there are others here that will be more than willing to help

    In terms of deciding which version to run, if you want to stick with RH then I'd suggest staying away from version 8. It was a dog, and most either run 7.3 or version 9. If you want an older version similar to what you have at work, give RH9 a try, or for a more up to date distro, try Fedora Core 3 (although there will be a few more differences between that and the RH8 you're running at work).

    Hope that helps you some,

    Ned

  3. #3
    Joined
    Jan 2003
    Location
    State College, PA
    Posts
    674

    Re: damn people afraid of change!

    Thanks Ned,

    now that you mention it, my predecessor said there was a copy of the bible in my boss' basement.

    i'll have to dig that out while he's in belize next month.

    a 1 month vacation as a tax writeoff - the perks of owning a multinational company i guess.
    ...and so it came to pass that the countess, who once bathed in the rejuvenating blood of a hundred virgins, was buried alive...

  4. #4
    Joined
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Marietta, GA
    Age
    32
    Posts
    1,100

    Re: damn people afraid of change!

    If you really want to know everything your machine is doing after 6 months I would suggest moving to a more hands on distro like debian or gentoo. I have gentoo and just started about 6-8 months ago on it. I can do most things with it now. I think you learn more with gentoo because you have to do most things by hand instead of using all the wizards fedora/red hat offer. From what I've heard Debian is much like gentoo except you don't have to compile everything. Plus, I think you should stay away from any RPM based distro because RPM's are freaking annoying.

  5. #5
    Joined
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Finland
    Posts
    1,096

    Re: damn people afraid of change!

    Quote Originally Posted by demonwarp66
    so where does one begin learning about this stuff? i'd like to be proficient in the following well within 6 months:

    installing and configuring hardware.
    installing and configuring software packages for typical small office functions.
    troubleshooting the above.
    Start with Red Hat's own documents if you're using their distro: http://www.redhat.com/docs/manuals/linux/

    If you already got RHL8 installed and know Unix basics, start with the System Administration Primer.

    If you decide to upgrade to Fedora, you can use the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4 documentation.

  6. #6
    Joined
    Sep 2002
    Location
    In and out of Detroit
    Posts
    1,556

    Re: damn people afraid of change!

    If you want to get to know hardware, get to know the kernel.
    this is a pretty good guide

    "Well, let's just say, 'if your VCR is still blinking 12:00,you don't want Linux.'"
    - Bruce Perens, Former Debian Project Leader

  7. #7
    Joined
    Jan 2003
    Location
    State College, PA
    Posts
    674

    Re: damn people afraid of change!

    cool. looks like i've got lots of reading to do.

    thanks to everyone for pointing me in the right direction. i'm sure i'll be back as i get more specific issues to resolve.
    ...and so it came to pass that the countess, who once bathed in the rejuvenating blood of a hundred virgins, was buried alive...

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •