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  1. #46
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    Re: Afghanistan and Pakistan

    http://www.ft.com/cms/s/ac35906e-0ae...b5df10621.html

    US under fire over Afghan poppy plan

    By Guy Dinmore in Washington and Rachel Morarjee in Kabul
    Published: May 25 2007 19:39 | Last updated: May 25 2007 19:39

    The US is proceeding with plans for a big crop-spraying programme to destroy opium poppies in Afghanistan, in spite of resistance from the government of President Hamid Karzai and objections from some senior US military officers who fear it will fuel the Taliban insurgency.
    A US delegation will soon leave for Kabul to persuade Mr Karzai that glycophate, a herbicide that is widely applied by US farmers, is safe to use and that trial ground-spraying should begin for the first time since the US ousted the Taliban regime in 2001.
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    But controversy over the proposed spraying is causing rifts within the Nato alliance. Some governments, including Germany, want nothing to do with the eradication programme and are threatening to reconsider their posture in Afghanistan, diplomats say. Afghan security forces trained by Dyncorp, a private US defence contractor, are to carry out the spraying.
    “There has to be a stick that goes with the carrot,” said Ambassador Thomas Schweich, US co-ordinator for counter-narcotics in Afghanistan. Eradication had to be a component of US policy, he said.
    Mr Schweich said no decision had been reached on aerial spraying and this would rest on agreement with the Afghan government. But he made it clear that crop spraying was the preferred US approach, combined with economic development and information programmes as well as robust efforts to interdict drug traffickers.
    Pointing to a map of Afghanistan, he described a broad north-south divide. Poppy cultivation had either fallen sharply or stabilised in the north-central provinces that were more secure, but risen in the west, south and east, where the Taliban insurgency was gaining strength.
    Eradication would target wealthier farmers who had spurned other development options, he said. “We are not targeting poor farmers. This is fiction,” he said.
    Afghanistan supplies over 90 per cent of the world’s opium, but the crop also accounts for about a third of the country’s entire economic output.
    “The US is hell-bent on eradication,” said Robert Rotberg, Harvard University professor. “They claim it worked in Colombia and so will work in Afghanistan. It is not clear to anyone it worked in Colombia,” he added.

  2. #47
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    Re: Afghanistan and Pakistan

    Spoiler!
    Promote then, as an object of primary importance, institutions for the general diffusion of knowledge. In proportion as the structure of a government gives force to public opinion, it is essential that public opinion should be enlightened.

  3. #48
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    Re: Afghanistan and Pakistan

    Not just our government. But I take the point certainly.

    "The disagreement has to do with the best means of solving the problem. The current policy of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and the United States seeks to destroy poppy crops and punish the farmers. The Senlis Council (in co-operation with specialists in opiates and their regulation, working at the Universities of Calgary and Toronto) offers an alternative aimed at legalized, regulated poppy production in Afghanistan to supply the developing world with needed painkillers.
    (By 2015, the World Health Organization estimates there will be 10 million cancer cases per year in the developing countries, in addition to the millions of cases of HIV/AIDS. The WHO describes the expected demand for opium-based medicines as a “world pain crisis.”)
    Traffic in morphine and codeine is licensed by the International Narcotics Control Board. The INCB points out that the richest nations (the United States, United Kingdom, France, Japan, Germany, Australia and Canada) consume nearly all of the world's opiates, leaving 80 per cent of the globe's population virtually without.
    Could opiates made from Afghan poppies make up the shortfall, if the INCB were to license growing there, as it does in France, India and Turkey? Undoubtedly. Meeting the global demand for pain medication has been estimated to require about double the current Afghan production. Maia Szalavitz, a senior fellow at Stats, a media watchdog group, has estimated the cost of buying the entire Afghan poppy crop at the current market price, set today by Afghan drug lords, as about $600-million — less than the $780-million the United States budgeted last year for eradication."

    ^^Seems rational to me. Lots of ways to skin a cat.
    Buy the entire crop? Farmers are happy and there is nothing left to fund AQ and others.
    Last edited by jimzinsocal; 05-27-2007 at 02:43 PM.

  4. #49
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    Re: Afghanistan and Pakistan

    Lemme go on abit.
    Whats gonna happen is the farmers will be punished.
    Wrong guys to punish.
    Not like they have a great deal of choice about what to grow.
    I just dont like tossing out the baby with bathwater.
    Why not look real hard at finding legit ways to use the product?

    Everyone wins. Execpt AQ. Weve just cut off his source of cash.

  5. #50
    Joined
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    Re: Afghanistan and Pakistan

    Yep, I agree.
    Promote then, as an object of primary importance, institutions for the general diffusion of knowledge. In proportion as the structure of a government gives force to public opinion, it is essential that public opinion should be enlightened.

  6. #51
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    Re: Afghanistan and Pakistan

    ^^Yup. Why be perceived as "bad" when its so simple to be seen as "good".
    Government geniuses should read The Prince. But thats another thread.

  7. #52
    Joined
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    Re: Afghanistan and Pakistan

    damn leakers!

    Hunt for 'traitors' splits Taliban


    Taliban insurgents fighting in Afghanistan and Pakistan have been hit by a wave of defections and betrayals that has resulted in a witch-hunt within the militant movement.

    The news has boosted morale among commanders of the Nato operation in Afghanistan, which includes more than 6,000 British soldiers. The British contingent has struggled to contain the insurgency in the country's southern provinces over the past 18 months. Last week saw renewed violence with a series of suicide bombings.
    'There have been desultory efforts over several years to penetrate the Taliban and to play off the various factions within the militancy and along the frontier against each other, but now that has become the keystone of the intelligence effort,' said one Pakistan-based source. 'That's paying off.'

    Last week three Central Asian militants were killed in a Pakistani army operation against makeshift training camps and Nato airstrikes in western Afghanistan are thought to have wiped out a dozen mid-ranking Taliban members returning from a meeting.

    'There is a feeling that there are spies everywhere,' said one tribal leader speaking by telephone from the violent and anarchic North Waziristan 'tribal agency' along Pakistan's border with Afghanistan. 'People are very worried and no one is trusting anyone any more.'



    bb

  8. #53
    Joined
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    In bed with one of my avatar AMD girls :D
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    8,876

    Re: Afghanistan and Pakistan

    Quote Originally Posted by AMDScooter View Post
    Yup... you know.. the other war that the Democrats voted yes to authorize.. ssshhhh... people are still dying in Afghanistan also...


    Market blast kills 21 civilians in Afghanista
    Umm democrats authorized this war cause that is where supposedly bin laden was.
    Yet the people you support are sending our military to place where bin laden isnt and has nothing to do with.....

    Sure says a lot about them....

  9. #54
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    Re: Afghanistan and Pakistan


    A U.S. CH-47 Chinook helicopter crashes in Afghanistan, killing seven people, NATO officials tell CNN, adding a rescue team was ambushed.
    http://www.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/asiapc...ter/index.html

    WASHINGTON (CNN) -- A U.S. CH-47 Chinook helicopter went down Wednesday night in southern Afghanistan, U.S. and NATO officials said.

    Preliminary reports indicate the helicopter was shot down, officials said.

    Seven people -- five military crew and two military passengers -- were killed.

    Additionally, NATO officials said the team that responded to the crash was ambushed. There was no immediate word on casualties during that attack.

    It came amid fighting in the south between Taliban militants and NATO and Afghan forces.

    From CNN's Barbara Starr
    Promote then, as an object of primary importance, institutions for the general diffusion of knowledge. In proportion as the structure of a government gives force to public opinion, it is essential that public opinion should be enlightened.

  10. #55
    Joined
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    Re: Afghanistan and Pakistan

    http://www.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/asiapc...ban/index.html

    WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Weapons crossing the border from Iran to Afghanistan may be winding up in the hands of the Taliban, the hard-line Islamic militia that is battling U.S.- and NATO-led forces in Afghanistan, U.S. and British officials said.
    Emphasis mine:
    Spoiler!
    Promote then, as an object of primary importance, institutions for the general diffusion of knowledge. In proportion as the structure of a government gives force to public opinion, it is essential that public opinion should be enlightened.

  11. #56
    Joined
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  12. #57
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    Posts
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    Re: Afghanistan and Pakistan

    http://www.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/asiapc....tv/index.html

    LAHORE, Pakistan (CNN) -- The Pakistani government has blocked the transmission of the Geo News TV channel, a company official said Sunday.

    GEO News Managing Director Nasir Baig Chugtai told CNN that viewers called the Geo office asking why the transmission of "Meray Mutabik," a popular prime-time show, was halted.

    During the last few programs, the show's anchor, Shahid Masood, criticized the government for recent bans and threats to journalists.
    Spoiler!
    Promote then, as an object of primary importance, institutions for the general diffusion of knowledge. In proportion as the structure of a government gives force to public opinion, it is essential that public opinion should be enlightened.

  13. #58
    Joined
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    Posts
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    Re: Afghanistan and Pakistan

    Yea rah rah. Stupid. Stupid workaround.
    How about we consider an analogy?
    How would all the folks in this country have liked it if
    back when if all the money from tobacco were yanked because someone somewhere "decided" it was a bad drug?

    http://www.examiner.com/a-767171~House_Approves_Bill_Limiting_Afghan_Aid.html?cid=rss-Politics

    ^^You will need to read back in the thread and see the discussion Orang and I had on the topic to understand why I roll my eyes at some of this crap.
    Last edited by jimzinsocal; 06-06-2007 at 07:27 PM.

  14. #59
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    Re: Afghanistan and Pakistan

    sure it's a dirty job but someone has to do it. put pressure on the quartback and they start to make mistakes. i'm beginning to see a pattern here.

    Friday May 11, 2007
    US-led forces admit civilian casualties in Afghan fightin

    "There are confirmed reports of civilian casualties, but it was unclear how many," the statement said. "A joint Afghan and coalition force inquiry is being conducted."

    Local people around the village of Soro, where the battle took place on Tuesday, said up to 40 civilians died when coalition planes made bombing raids, with 12 people dying in a single home. The governor of Helmand province put the death toll at 21.

    General Dan McNeill, the top Nato commander in Afghanistan, said it was possible that some civilian casualties were caused because Taliban forces had fired on troops from inside civilian homes.

    The air strike was called in after US special forces came under attack from "a far superior force", Gen McNeill told US National Public Radio.

    "And eventually the only way they were going (to) get out of it ... was to use air strikes," he said.

    It is the third major incident in recent months of civilians being killed by coalition military action, a record that led Afghanistan's president, Hamid Karzai, to urge commanders to try harder to prevent such casualties.

    In March, US Marines fired on civilians after a suicide attack in eastern Afghanistan, killing 19 civilians and wounding 50. Late last month, air strikes and fighting killed around 50 civilians in the western province of Herat, according to Afghan and UN officials.
    Tuesday June 19, 2007
    Taliban Fighters Seize South Afghan Area

    Sunday July 1, 2007
    'Up to 80 civilians dead' after US air strikes in Afghanistan

    Air strikes in the British-controlled Helmand province of Afghanistan may have killed civilians, coalition troops said yesterday as local people claimed that between 50 and 80 people, many of them women and children, had died.

    In the latest of a series of attacks causing significant civilian casualties in recent weeks, more than 200 were killed by coalition troops in Afghanistan in June, far more than are believed to have been killed by Taliban militants.
    Senior British soldiers have previously expressed concerns that McNeill, who took command of the 32,000 Nato troops in Afghanistan only recently, was 'a fan' of the massive use of air power to defeat insurgents and that his favoured tactics could be counter-productive.

    'Every civilian dead means five new Taliban,' said one British officer who has recently returned from Helmand. 'It's a tough call when the enemy are hiding in villages, but you have to be very, very careful,' he added.



    bb

  15. #60
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    Re: Afghanistan and Pakistan

    ^^^War is hell

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