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  1. #1
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    One of the best has passed.

    http://www.cnn.com/2007/SHOWBIZ/book...gut/index.html

    NEW YORK (CNN) -- Kurt Vonnegut, whose absurdist visions and cynical outlook infused such books as "Slaughterhouse-Five" and "Cat's Cradle," has died. He was 84.

    Vonnegut died at New York's Mount Sinai Hospital at 9:45 p.m. ET Wednesday, said his wife, photographer Jill Krementz.

    Vonnegut had been hospitalized for several weeks after suffering brain injuries following a fall at his East Side Manhattan home.

    "Kurt was a loving, funny husband who always made me laugh," Krementz said. "He was a wonderful father who was proud and supportive of his children."

    Vonnegut's novels and short stories, which blended humor, bitterness, profundity and a devout humanity, attracted a wide audience and made him a key figure in 20th-century American literature. (Share your memories of Vonnegut on our Marquee blog.)

    "He was a man who combined a wicked sense of humor and sort of steady moral compass, who was always sort of looking at the big picture of the things that were most important," Joel Bleifuss, editor of the liberal magazine In These Times, told The Associated Press. Vonnegut occasionally contributed to In These Times.
    It was just a matter of time. Whether or not you agree with his outlooks on life you can't argue his literary genius. He was well loved all around the world. Rest in Peace Kurt.

    I was lucky enough to have a father who owned all of Kurt's books. I have read them all at least once.

    My personal favorite? God Bless You Mr. Rosewater.

  2. #2
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    Re: One of the best has passed.

    So it goes.

  3. #3
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    Re: One of the best has passed.

    Breakfast of Champions!

    But I pretty much like them all, especially the stories with my cousin Kilgore Trout in them.
    Tyan S5397 2x X5450 16GB - SuperMicro H8DCI 2x 275 8GB - Iwill DK8X 2x Opteron 250 2GB


    Take a Kid FISHING!

  4. #4
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    Re: One of the best has passed.

    First thing that came to mind for me was Rodney Dangerfield in Back to School. "Whoever did write this doesn't know the first thing about Kurt Vonnegut." LOL

  5. #5
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    Re: One of the best has passed.

    The end of an era thats for sure. I was thinking on this today cause Ive been reading the guy for so many years you develop the sense almost thats he is gonna be around forever.
    In one sense sure but you just dont ever consider someone like him actually dying.
    Like LS said above. So it goes. And so forth...

  6. #6
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    Re: One of the best has passed.

    Id link to Vonneguts sketch of an ass hole so everyone could crack up but our obnoxious word filter tells me its "wrong"

  7. #7
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    Re: One of the best has passed.

    Here we go. Maybe a better memory

    http://forums.pcper.com/showthread.p...on#post3956219

  8. #8
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    Re: One of the best has passed.

    who is err..was this dude and what did he do?

    add a couple 120mm fans overhead to drop temps by 10+ celsiusD.S.C-12(2)-disclaimer : whatever u do with your hardware/software is your
    responsibility, which i dont hold if u break anything

    GRAB here OcBible v1.55 and Guidemania v1.21
    scary pooch?pooch#1taking ball from dogpooch pulln on ropeme on board after 2 years
    of no board
    http://gonny.se/ <-cool lady http://www.mediafire.com/?8dmg21ms1vx
    IN MEMORY OF HOW BM WAS TREATED HERE...

  9. #9
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    Re: One of the best has passed.

    Quote Originally Posted by _dangtx_ View Post
    who is err..was this dude and what did he do?
    An author with a unique style and a cultish (from my perspective )following.

  10. #10
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    Re: One of the best has passed.

    Serious "cult" sort of novelist. Bigtime during the 60's 70's 80's.
    Sort of influenced an entire generation with Slaughter House Five [an anti war reflection] Breakfast of Champions [one of the funniest things I ever read] Sirens of Titan [sci fi] and a list of others as long as my arm.

    Later in his life he became a pretty strong advocate for the enviroment...that was a novel called Galopogos.

    Just one of those interesting characters dan...that a couple of generations just liked alot. Funny funny guy with an "edge" everyone could tolerate
    because he said things [made points] in a really funny way.

    edit[whoops] [as mv just said]^^^^


    All this happened, more or less. The war parts, anyway, are pretty much true.
    Kurt Vonnegut

    Any reviewer who expresses rage and loathing for a novel is preposterous. He or she is like a person who has put on full armor and attacked a hot fudge sundae.
    Kurt Vonnegut

    Be careful what you pretend to be because you are what you pretend to be.
    Kurt Vonnegut

    Beware of the man who works hard to learn something, learns it, and finds himself no wiser than before.
    Kurt Vonnegut

    Call me Jonah. My parents did, or nearly did. They called me John.
    Kurt Vonnegut

    Here we are, trapped in the amber of the moment. There is no why.
    Kurt Vonnegut

    Human beings will be happier - not when they cure cancer or get to Mars or eliminate racial prejudice or flush Lake Erie but when they find ways to inhabit primitive communities again. That's my utopia.
    Kurt Vonnegut

    I really wonder what gives us the right to wreck this poor planet of ours.
    Kurt Vonnegut

    I tell you, we are here on Earth to fart around, and don't let anybody tell you different.
    Kurt Vonnegut

    I want to stand as close to the edge as I can without going over. Out on the edge you see all the kinds of things you can't see from the center.
    Kurt Vonnegut

    If people think nature is their friend, then they sure don't need an enemy.
    Kurt Vonnegut

    If you can do a half-assed job of anything, you're a one-eyed man in a kingdom of the blind.
    Kurt Vonnegut

    It is a very mixed blessing to be brought back from the dead.
    Kurt Vonnegut

    Laughter and tears are both responses to frustration and exhaustion. I myself prefer to laugh, since there is less cleaning up to do afterward.
    Kurt Vonnegut

    Life happens too fast for you ever to think about it. If you could just persuade people of this, but they insist on amassing information.
    Kurt Vonnegut

    Maturity is a bitter disappointment for which no remedy exists, unless laughter could be said to remedy anything.
    Kurt Vonnegut

    People don't come to church for preachments, of course, but to daydream about God.
    Kurt Vonnegut

    People have to talk about something just to keep their voice boxes in working order so they'll have good voice boxes in case there's ever anything really meaningful to say.
    Kurt Vonnegut

    Some jerk infected the Internet with an outright lie. It shows how easy it is to do and how credulous people are.
    Kurt Vonnegut

    Still and all, why bother? Here's my answer. Many people need desperately to receive this message: I feel and think much as you do, care about many of the things you care about, although most people do not care about them. You are not alone.
    Kurt Vonnegut

    The universe is a big place, perhaps the biggest.
    Kurt Vonnegut

    The year was 2081, and everyone was finally equal.
    Kurt Vonnegut

    This is a tale of a meeting of two lonesome, skinny, fairly old white men on a planet which was dying fast.
    Kurt Vonnegut

    To whom it may concern: It is springtime. It is late afternoon.
    Kurt Vonnegut

    True terror is to wake up one morning and discover that your high school class is running the country.
    Kurt Vonnegut

    We are what we pretend to be, so we must be careful what we pretend to be.
    Kurt Vonnegut

    We could have saved the Earth but we were too damned cheap.
    Kurt Vonnegut

    What should young people do with their lives today? Many things, obviously. But the most daring thing is to create stable communities in which the terrible disease of loneliness can be cured.
    Kurt Vonnegut

    Who is more to be pitied, a writer bound and gagged by policemen or one living in perfect freedom who has nothing more to say?
    Last edited by jimzinsocal; 04-12-2007 at 04:49 PM.

  11. #11
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    Re: One of the best has passed.

    See dan? For alot of us...Vonnegut was the posterboy for "antiestablishment" He was the guy we read when we figured it was just all a pile of shit. We got cheered up and reinforced because we knew this famous guy...was thinking similar thoughts.
    IMO.

  12. #12
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    Re: One of the best has passed.

    Whoah. His wife must have seen to this.
    What a summary

    http://www.vonnegut.com/

    Wait. It was his own sketch.

    http://blog.cleveland.com/entertainm...tive_harr.html


    And one of my favorites:

    1492. As children we were taught to memorize this year with pride and joy as the year people began living full and imaginative lives on the continent of North America. Actually, people had been living full and imaginative lives on the continent of North America for hundreds of years before that. 1492 was simply the year sea pirates began to rob, cheat, and kill them.Kurt Vonnegut, Breakfast of Champions


    More stuff you may not know:

    http://www.stanford.edu/~ablaser/art.html


    Standard wiki stuff

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kurt_Vonnegut


    World War II and the firebombing of Dresden

    Vonnegut's experience as a soldier and prisoner of war had a profound influence on his later work. As an advance scout with the U.S. 106th Infantry Division during the Battle of the Bulge, Vonnegut was cut off from his battalion and wandered alone behind enemy lines for several days until captured by German troops on December 14, 1944.[5] While a prisoner of war, Vonnegut witnessed the aftermath of the February 1315, 1945 bombing of Dresden, Germany, which destroyed much of the city. Vonnegut was one of just seven American prisoners of war in Dresden to survive, in an underground meatpacking cellar known as Slaughterhouse Five. "Utter destruction," he recalled. "Carnage unfathomable." The Nazis put him to work gathering bodies for mass burial, Vonnegut explains. "But there were too many corpses to bury. So instead the Nazis sent in guys with flamethrowers. All these civilians' remains were burned to ashes."[6] This experience formed the core of his most famous work, Slaughterhouse-Five and is a theme in at least six other books.[6]
    Vonnegut was freed by Soviet troops in May 1945. Upon returning to America, Vonnegut was awarded a Purple Heart for what he called a "ludicrously negligible wound."[7]


    Last edited by jimzinsocal; 04-12-2007 at 07:35 PM.

  13. #13
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    Re: One of the best has passed.

    Posted: Thursday, April 12, 2007 11:06 AM by Gael Fashingbauer Cooper
    Categories: Tributes


    The most shocking thing about losing Kurt Vonnegut was realizing he was already 84. Something about that shock of curly hair, the mischievious face, and above all, the accessibility of his writing made him seem forever thirtysomething. We thought we'd have him around forever, that he'd somehow managed to pull a Billy Pilgrim and come unstuck in time.
    I remember discovering Vonnegut novels in my Catholic high-school library and sitting on the floor of the fiction room to read them. You weren't supposed to sit in the fiction room -- who knows why? -- but if you slumped below the windows, no one would see you, and you could read as long as you liked. Vonnegut's novels were lively and smart, and even if you weren't reading them in a place you weren't supposed to be, it felt like you were getting away with something just by knowing about them.
    But my best Vonnegut story is this. In college, a good friend was as addicted to Vonnegut as some people are to chocolate or exercise. He put himself through school working at a grocery store, and even when working the cash register or bagging purchases, he'd always have a novel, usually the masterpiece "Slaughterhouse-Five," tucked in his pocket.
    It may have been so he could read in those precious minutes in the break room, surrounded by fruit crates and vending machines, but it also seemed as if he was a Vonnegut salesman in the same way some people sell Avon or Amway. Talk to him for just a few minutes and you'd know he adored Vonnegut's books, and it'd be tough to get away from him without feeling that you had to do the same. I wonder sometimes how many polite, but ultimately disinterested customers came in to buy apples or Comet and left with a little lecture on the wonders of "Slaughterhouse-Five."
    This same friend dressed up at Billy Pilgrim for a Halloween party one year, complete with a Tralfamadorian made from a toilet plunger. (Tralfamadorians were the aliens who abduct and educate Billy in the book.) The Tralfamadorian was really impressive for a homemade costume prop, but I was still surprised to learn that the friend had later sent the Tralfamadorian to Vonnegut himself.
    You might think that someone as famous as Vonnegut would have a bodyguard screening his mail, blowing up awkwardly shaped packages from unknown fans. But apparently not, because later on, when an interview with Vonnegut was published in a magazine or newspaper, a photo of him in his home accompanied the article. And in the background of the photo? My friend's Tralfamadorian, in a place of honor.
    This led, somehow, to the two, great fan and great author, striking up a regular writing correspondence. It seems so unreal, somehow, that a man that famous would regularly write to an unknown. You wouldn't expect Brad Pitt to do this kind of thing. But words were Vonnegut's life, and so perhaps he saw in my friend's letters a kindred spirit. I don't know what the letters said -- it didn't seem right to ask -- but the very idea that they carried on a correspondence seemed absolutely perfect to those of us who remember those grocery-store days.
    In "Slaughterhouse-Five," Vonnegut drew a headstone that was marked "Everything was beautiful, and nothing hurt." He knew better than many of us that life was never like that, and that if it was, we would all be lost. Fellow author Gore Vidal said of Vonnegut "He was sort of like nobody else," noting that other World War II-influenced writers chose the straight, realistic path, whereas Vonnegut reached for the imaginative stars. "Kurt was never dull," Vidal said. Never dull, and if my friend's experience is any example, never the kind of author who forgot his readers.

  14. #14
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    Re: One of the best has passed.

    Bah. Ill leave it alone now. I appreciate that Liquidsoul did a thread about one of our heroes.

    Like the guys last sketch...




    and I am reminded of this


    THE OLD ITALIANS DYING

    For years the old Italians have been dying
    all over America
    For years the old Italians in faded felt hats
    have been sunning themselves and dying
    You have seen them on the benches
    in the park in Washington Square
    the old Italians in their black high button shoes
    the old men in their old felt fedoras
    with stained hatbands
    have been dying and dying
    day by day
    You have seen them
    every day in Washington Square San Francisco
    the slow bell
    tolls in the morning
    in the Church of Peter & Paul
    in the marzipan church on the plaza
    toward ten in the morning the slow bell tolls
    in the towers of Peter & Paul
    and the old men who are still alive
    sit sunning themselves in a row
    on the wood benches in the park
    and watch the processions in and out
    funerals in the morning
    weddings in the afternoon
    slow bell in the morning
    Fast bell at noon
    In one door out the other
    the old men sit there in their hats
    and watch the coming & going
    You have seen them
    the ones who feed the pigeons
    cutting the stale bread
    with their thumbs & penknives
    the ones with old pocketwatches
    the old ones with gnarled hands
    and wild eyebrows
    the ones with the baggy pants
    with both belt & suspenders
    the grappa drinkers with teeth like corn
    the Piemontesi the Genovesi the Siciliani
    smelling of garlic & pepperoni
    the ones who loved Mussolini
    the old fascists
    the ones who loved Garibaldi

    the old anarchists reading L'Umanita Nuova
    the ones who loved Sacco & Vanzetti
    They are almost all gone now
    They are sitting and waiting their turn
    and sunning themselves
    in front of the church
    over the doors of which is inscribed
    a phrase which would seem to be unfinished
    from Dante's Paradiso
    about the glory of the One
    who moves everything ...
    The old men are waiting
    for it to be finished
    for their glorious sentence on earth
    to be finished
    the slow bell tolls & tolls
    the pigeons strut about
    not even thinking of flying
    the air too heavy with heavy tolling

    The black hired hearses draww up
    the black limousines with black windowshades
    shielding the widows
    the widows with the long black veils
    who will outlive them all

    You have seen them
    madre di terra, madre di mare
    The widows climb out of
    the limousines
    The family mourners step out in stiff suits
    The widows walk so slowly
    up the steps of the cathedral
    fishnet veils drawn down
    leaning hard on darkcloth arms

    Their faces do not fall apart
    They are merely drawn apart
    They are still the matriarchs
    outliving everyone
    the old dagos dying out
    in Little Italys
    all over America
    the old dead dagos
    hauled out in the morning sun
    that does not mourn for anyone
    One by one Year by year
    they are carried out

    The bell never stops tolling
    The old Italians
    with lapstrake faces
    are hauled out of the hearses
    by the paid pallbearers
    in mafioso mourning coats & dark glasses

    The old dead men are hauled out
    in their black coffins
    like small skiffs
    They enter the true church
    for the first time in many years
    in these carved black boats
    ready to be ferried over

    The priests scurry about
    as if to cast off the lines

    The other old men
    still alive on the benches
    watch it all with their hats on
    You have seen them sitting there
    waiting for the bocce ball
    to stop rolling
    waiting for the bell
    to stop tolling & tolling
    for the show bell
    to be finished tolling
    telling the unfinished Paradiso story
    as seen in an unfinished phrase
    on the face of a church
    as seen in a fisherman's face
    in a blaaacak boat without sails making his final haul.
    Last edited by jimzinsocal; 04-12-2007 at 08:53 PM.

  15. #15
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    Re: One of the best has passed.

    Thanks for all of the good memories JimZ!

    There are a lot of people around Indy who are mourning the loss of him. He was actually going to return here and speak at Butler at the end of this month. Tickets sold out in less than 10 minutes.

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