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  1. #31
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    Re: The magnificient U.K. thread

    Well the policy of regional parliaments is another EU-inspired divide and conquer tactic that the Blair regime has been keen to push.

    In 2004 they held a referendum on creating an elected assembly in the North East of England. This was rejected by a huge 696,519 votes to 197,310 I'm glad to say. People aren't as dumb as politicians think. We don't want another tier of useless politicians interfering with lives.

    Not that that will stop them. Next time they won't hold a referendum. Problem solved.

  2. #32
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    Re: The magnificient U.K. thread

    I hadnt realized how the EU deal has been such a negative so far as damage to national identities etc.

  3. #33
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    Re: The magnificient U.K. thread

    I didn't either. It sounds like a lot of the freedoms we take for granted a lot
    of the times are almost non-existent over in the UK and EU. More the reason
    to keep fighting for these freedoms. Just reminds me, I must renew my NRA
    membership next month.

  4. #34
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    Re: The magnificient U.K. thread

    ^^What a learning experience to hear from these guys.
    Some of the stuff is common to what we go thru here....but the rest?
    Well now weve got a thread[spot for it]

  5. #35
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    Re: The magnificient U.K. thread

    Quote Originally Posted by jimzinsocal View Post
    I hadnt realized how the EU deal has been such a negative so far as damage to national identities etc.
    Well really a 'national identity' is an anathema to the idea of the EU. It, like International Socialism, Marxism, Trotskyism etc is based on an atheistic, humanist ideal. A soft-focus world of candy floss clouds and butterscotch waterfalls. That's why academics and other elite 'intellectuals' buy into it.

    Nationalism (so the mantra goes) causes nasty things like war. Although I can't think of a single conflict in all of human history that was started by an ordinary member of the public. Can you? Seems to me that wars are started by either royalty, emperors, dictators or politicians.

    Although (being Europe) it is predominantly a left leaning idea, it is not exclusively so. In fact some of Britain’s biggest Europhiles (or 'traitors' as I prefer to call them) are members of the Conservative Party. It was a Conservative Prime Minister, Ted Heath that got us in in 1973. He gave our fishing rights away as a sweetener, but you can't make an omelet without breaking eggs can you?

  6. #36
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    Re: The magnificient U.K. thread

    Nationalism (so the mantra goes) causes nasty things like war. Although I can't think of a single conflict in all of human history that was started by an ordinary member of the public. Can you? Seems to me that wars are started by either royalty, emperors, dictators or politicians.
    I think you could probably add religion figures to that as well..

  7. #37
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    Re: The magnificient U.K. thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Enmore View Post
    Well really a 'national identity' is an anathema to the idea of the EU. It, like International Socialism, Marxism, Trotskyism etc is based on an atheistic, humanist ideal. A soft-focus world of candy floss clouds and butterscotch waterfalls. That's why academics and other elite 'intellectuals' buy into it.

    Nationalism (so the mantra goes) causes nasty things like war. Although I can't think of a single conflict in all of human history that was started by an ordinary member of the public. Can you? Seems to me that wars are started by either royalty, emperors, dictators or politicians.

    Although (being Europe) it is predominantly a left leaning idea, it is not exclusively so. In fact some of Britainís biggest Europhiles (or 'traitors' as I prefer to call them) are members of the Conservative Party. It was a Conservative Prime Minister, Ted Heath that got us in in 1973. He gave our fishing rights away as a sweetener, but you can't make an omelet without breaking eggs can you?
    Finally someone making some sense

  8. #38
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    Re: The magnificient U.K. thread

    Great, just great...

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/programme..._4/6691723.stm

    Sub crews' cost cutting criticism

    Sailors are complaining at the state of repair of their submarines
    Britain's nuclear deterrent rests on a Vanguard class submarine lurking in the depths of the ocean to avoid detection.


    Britain's nuclear deterrent rests on a Vanguard class submarine lurking in the depths of the ocean to avoid detection.
    The Royal Navy has four of these submarines, each armed with 16 missiles carrying multiple nuclear warheads. At all times one boat is on patrol.

    BBC Radio 4's File On 4 has heard sailors' complaints that the condition of these and the rest of the navy's submarines are being affected by government cost-cutting.

    Indeed one sailor serving on a Trident submarine claims they are "just about" seaworthy, with crews scouring other subs for spare parts in a massive "make do and mend" operation.

    The senior rating said crews frequently experienced problems with oxygen production equipment on board as well as with the batteries on the craft.

    "Our subs are nuclear powered but if for any reason we can't use the nuclear power we would use the battery," he said.

    "If it was in an escape situation, the reactor would be shut down and you would need the battery.

    "There's so many things that seem to go wrong that the guys do an unbelievable job fixing it, and how they keep going is beyond me.

    "If the government want a Premier League weapons platform, you need to have the equipment, the skills, you need to have all of this in place in case anything goes wrong and they don't have that.

    "They want a Premier League system and they're paying Third Division prices.

    He added: "The boats are safe to go to sea, but I would say just safe."

    I have seen water all over the control room floor, we're talking about half an inch over a large area. You deal with it, mop it up but it is not ideal

    Former Petty Officer Paul Reidy
    Former First Sea Lord Sir Alan West argues that cost cutting is a problem across the Navy.

    Sir Alan said the service has some excellent sailors of whom the nation should be proud, but added: "What really demotivates them is that they're working flat out to make sure their system, their ship, their aeroplane is the best in the world, sorry we haven't got this spare part."

    But Armed Forces Minister Adam Ingram denied there was any problem.

    He said the Navy's overall morale is of the "highest standard".

    And he rejected the claims that Trident submarines are just about seaworthy.

    'Highly safe'

    "That has never been put to me" said Mr Ingram, who added that safety on Royal Navy submarines was of the "highest order."

    But sailors on the Navy's nuclear powered Trafalgar class submarines, which carry conventional weapons, are also concerned.

    Former Petty Officer Paul Reidy said that towards the end of his career he was worried about the state of the submarines he served on.

    The vessels suffered from leaking hatches and unfinished equipment, he said.

    'Leaking hatches'

    "The hatches were constantly leaking, they were sealing at 50 to 100 metres down when it should be three metres down.

    He added: "I have seen water all over the control room floor, we're talking about half an inch over a large area. You deal with it, mop it up but it is not ideal."

    Another sailor, who wished to remain anonymous, said in his five years aboard Trafalgar class vessels they experienced potential dangerous failures of electrical systems.

    He said on one occasion his craft might have sunk to the bottom of the sea with its crew trapped inside following a systems failure.

    "If we weren't coming up we would have been stuck there, if we were going down we would not have been able to come back up."

  9. #39
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    Re: The magnificient U.K. thread

    Well, the Navy has been crippled by defence cuts to pay for all the wars.

    Just run them on the surface and they won't leak.

  10. #40
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    Re: The magnificient U.K. thread

    Did they not just finish building a new nuclear sub? Anti sub rather than a nuclear deterrent?

    Not much point in replacing the old ones till they decide on which nuclear deterrent they are going to replace Trident with.



    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/5270640.stm
    Last edited by mr necro; 05-29-2007 at 08:15 PM.

  11. #41
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    Re: The magnificient U.K. thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Enmore View Post
    Well, the Navy has been crippled by defence cuts to pay for all the wars.

    Just run them on the surface and they won't leak.
    The should get some training from the Russians, who must be the masters keeping leaking hulks afloat...

  12. #42
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    Re: The magnificient U.K. thread

    Bit of superglue round the hatches should sort it out.
    Last edited by Enmore; 06-01-2007 at 08:30 PM.

  13. #43
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    Re: The magnificient U.K. thread

    Quote Originally Posted by mr necro View Post
    Did they not just finish building a new nuclear sub? Anti sub rather than a nuclear deterrent?

    Not much point in replacing the old ones till they decide on which nuclear deterrent they are going to replace Trident with.



    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/5270640.stm

    Quote Originally Posted by From BBC
    The last submarine completed before Astute was laid down in 1993, and a series of redundancies in the intervening years had stripped the company of many of its most skilled engineers and designers.

    So BAE brought in a team of experts from its US submarine counterpart Electric Boat.
    Ah ha, I see. It was actually built by the Americans. I suppose that's to be expected, given that Lockheed-Martin owns virtually the whole of the UK Nuclear Weapons industry along with the Trident submarine maintenance facilities at Devonport. The Trident missiles are maintained in the US. The warheads although produced by us, are still prOduced by a company which is a subsiduary of Lockheed Martin.

    An "independent nuclear deterrent"? I think not!

    For Chrissake, if we're going to spend all this money, why the hell can't it go back into the pockets of UK companies, providing employment and subsequent economic spin-offs for people here, rather than having it going abroad.
    Last edited by Glyn_Mo; 05-30-2007 at 06:29 AM.

  14. #44
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    Re: The magnificient U.K. thread

    Its not been a truly independent nuclear deterrent since the days of Macmillan and Eisenhower.

    I'd rather they spent the money on proper border security than on renewing Trident.

  15. #45
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    Re: The magnificient U.K. thread

    This doesnt exactly belong...but maybe some of our Euro members will comment.
    From Prof Reynolds site

    A GERMAN BRAIN DRAIN: " For a nation that invented the term 'guest worker' for its immigrant labourers, Germany is facing the sobering fact that record numbers of its own often highly-qualified citizens are fleeing the country to work abroad in the biggest mass exodus for 60 years. Figures released by Germany's Federal Statistics Office showed that the number of Germans emigrating rose to 155,290 last year - the highest number since the country's reunification in 1990 - which equalled levels last experienced in the 1940s during the chaotic aftermath of the Second World War. . . . Fed up with comparatively poor job prospects at home - where unemployment is as high as 17 per cent in some regions - as well as high taxes and bureaucracy, thousands of Germans have upped sticks for Austria and Switzerland, or emigrated to the United States." Seems like the more socialist the country, the more its talented citizens tend to go elsewhere.
    posted at 01:37 PM by Glenn Reynolds

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