Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 57
  1. #31
    Joined
    May 2004
    Location
    third stone from the Sun
    Posts
    1,794

    Re: Ubuntu on an older computer

    Quote Originally Posted by MrNovi View Post
    supercat what mobo are you working with?
    FIC VA-503+ with MVP3 chipset, DMA2 is max for IDE. I had a Promise Ultra66 in there but needed that for another project.

  2. #32
    Joined
    May 2004
    Location
    third stone from the Sun
    Posts
    1,794

    Re: Ubuntu on an older computer

    enabled DMA using hdparm -d1 -X34 /dev/hdc and now Caddyshack runs much better ! however, xine says too many dropped frames so it suggested I run xine-check. this found two major errors

    1) multiple executables listed as

    /usr/bin/xine
    /usr/X11R6/bin/xine

    I believe the top one is correct, how do I remove the second one ? text editor ?

    2) many missing xine-lib, which I eventually found and installed libxine-dev

    however now it says no mrl when xine starts ? it started the application before, what is wrong now ? too many executables ?

    thanks in advance and have a great weekend, J

  3. #33
    Joined
    May 2004
    Location
    third stone from the Sun
    Posts
    1,794

    Re: Ubuntu on an older computer

    quick question, trying XMMS and it asks for the directory where the audio cd would be. they suggest /dev/cdrom or /dev/audio_cd, neither of which work. any suggestions ?

  4. #34
    Joined
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Out there, just read my posts
    Posts
    5,473

    Re: Ubuntu on an older computer

    most likely /media/cdrom or /dev/hdc - best way to find out, just type mount <enter> as superuser - it will tell you if you have a readable cd in the drive.

    also you don't need xine-lib-dev, unless you plan on developing the software, all you need is xine-lib and xine-ui (if you want a graphical user interface).

    as super user - when it's running, type ps -ef |grep xine - there should only be one entry with your username, and it will NOT be /etc/xinet.d - just simply xine - you will see another one that lists your use of ps -ef, if there are any others you get rid of them by typing as superuser

    kill -9 <process id number> <enter> - there are up to 15 numbered switches with the kill command -9 is explicit kill this will almost always end a process - and if you do it on the wrong process id it could do wierd things to your running O/S so be careful - you may want to try kill -1 or kill -15 1st. As stated a brief tour of man kill, would be a good idea.

    also xine does require some tweaking to make it fully happy - you can use the GUI - click the wrench and on the UI page select expert, then apply and restart so you can see more options, on my CentOS install the GUI hangs, so I go to /home/<username>/.xine and edit the config file - you probably need to check your video card, in a terminal window type glxgears <enter> if you see some spinning gears - 3D acceleration is working if not, or if framerate is real low, under 2500, you will NOT want to use opengl as the video driver, probably xshm would do you best.

  5. #35
    Joined
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Atlanta, Ga
    Posts
    80

    Re: Ubuntu on an older computer

    How do I switch video cards in Ubuntu? I had an old GF3 in it with the nvidia drivers and I took it out, put in an ati 9700, and now it won't boot into the desktop, just a dos looking screen which I don't have a clue what to do with. I guess it won't detect a new card, so how do I fix this?

  6. #36
    Joined
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Southern Ontario
    Age
    45
    Posts
    13,194

    Re: Ubuntu on an older computer

    Ubuntu didn't change the video card driver when you switched the cards. So what you'll need to do is modify the xorg.conf file that sets all the operating settings for X.

    First step is to log in. Using your normal log in name and password.

    Now we need to edit the configuration file. We'll use a command line editing program called Nano to do this task. But we'll also need special root privilages in order to edit the file we want so we'll have to do a sudo as well. And to make things simple, will tell nano to edit the file directly so we don't have to go through the file system to open it. Here is the command that will achieve all this:

    sudo nano -w /etc/X11/xorg.conf

    Note I also added the -w option to nano to disable the word wrapping (this makes things easier to read in configuration files). It'll probably ask for your password again. Just retype it and press enter.

    Now you should have a screen that starts something like this:
    Code:
    # /etc/X11/xorg.conf (xorg X Window System server configuration file)
    #
    # This file was generated by dexconf, the Debian X Configuration tool, using
    # values from the debconf database.
    #
    # Edit this file with caution, and see the xorg.conf(5) manual page.
    # (Type "man xorg.conf" at the shell prompt.)
    #
    # This file is automatically updated on xserver-xorg package upgrades *only*
    # if it has not been modified since the last upgrade of the xserver-xorg
    # package.
    This means you've successfully opened the xorg.conf file for editing. You now need to use the down arrow to find a section that will have something along these lines:

    Code:
    Section "Device"
            Identifier      "NVIDIA video card of some type"
            Driver          "nv"
            BusID           "PCI:1:5:0"
    EndSection
    You'll want to change it to say:

    Code:
    Section "Device"
            Identifier      "ATI Technologies Inc"
            Driver          "ati"
            BusID           "PCI:1:5:0"
    EndSection
    But do not edit the BusID section. It should be left the same as what you already have since you pulled the Nvidia card from the same slot you put the ATI card into.

    Next you'll need to search for this section:
    Code:
    Section "Screen"
            Identifier      "Default Screen"
            Device          "NVIDIA video card of some type"
            Monitor         "Visual Sensa"
            DefaultDepth    24
    .
    .
    .
    You'll have to change the Device line to read:
    Code:
            Device          "ATI Technologies Inc"
    Now you need to save the file and exit. Do this by pressing [Ctrl]-X followed by X. At this point you should be good to go. Try restarting X by using this command:

    startx

    If that doesn't work, simply do a reboot using sudo init 6 command.

  7. #37
    Joined
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Atlanta, Ga
    Posts
    80

    Re: Ubuntu on an older computer

    Thanks for all the help but I get stuck at the "sudo nano -w /etc/X11/xorg.conf" part where it accepts the command but gives me a screen which looks like all the nano commands with a column of letters down the side and explanations of what they do in the next column. It doesn't open the xorg.conf file like you show.
    Here's a question- if I boot from the live cd will it load the ati drivers from there?

  8. #38
    Joined
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Atlanta, Ga
    Posts
    80

    Re: Ubuntu on an older computer

    OK, never mind. I missed some spaces and didn't use a cap X in the command. So I'm in the file now and I'll let you know how it goes...

  9. #39
    Joined
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Atlanta, Ga
    Posts
    80

    Re: Ubuntu on an older computer

    Success! My device was always just listed as "generic video card" but I changed it to ATI Technologies Inc and I now have my desktop back. So now, do I need to install the latest ATI drivers or will it auto update those? Also, I have a Dell 2001 lcd monitor that should run at 1600x1200x32 and the most I can get is 1024x768x24. Is there a way to fix that?

  10. #40
    Joined
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Southern Ontario
    Age
    45
    Posts
    13,194

    Re: Ubuntu on an older computer

    We basically just switched to the open source driver for ATI cards. This driver is not the driver from ATI. You can try to install the ATI Radon drivers if you like. Ubuntu has their own package for them. I don't have a Radon card so I don't know how well it works. The only thing you'll really gain from using it would be the ability to apply 3D effects to your desktop, allow you to play some 3D games, and it may also help out with the playback of some higher resolution videos.

    As for the resolution, Ubuntu has an application that should allow you to choose your resolution. I think it's under System -> Preferences -> Screen Resolution. But if that won't provide you with the desired resolution you want, you can always go back into the xorg.conf file and force the resolution you want. I had to do this on my Ubuntu installation.

    First off we should now make a backup of your xorg.conf file seeing as this one is working and we could use it if we really mess something up. So open up a terminal and type this command:

    sudo copy /etc/X11/xorg.conf /etc/X11/xorg.conf.old

    Now we'll have a backup that we can restore at any time with this command:

    sudo copy /etc/X11/xorg.conf.old /etc/X11/xorg.conf



    Now lets do the nano command again:

    sudo nano -w /etc/X11/xorg.conf

    Find the "Screen" section again. It'll look something like this:
    Code:
    Section "Screen"
            Identifier      "Default Screen"
            Device          "ATI Technologies Inc"
            Monitor         "Visual Sensa"
            DefaultDepth    24
    
        Subsection "Display"
            Depth       8
            Modes       "1280x1024" "1024x768" "800x600" "640x480"
            ViewPort    0 0
        EndSubsection
        Subsection "Display"
            Depth       16
            Modes       "1280x1024" "1024x768" "800x600" "640x480"
            ViewPort    0 0
        EndSubsection
        Subsection "Display"
            Depth       24
            Modes       "1280x1024" "1024x768" "800x600" "640x480"
            ViewPort    0 0
        EndSubsection
    EndSection
    You'll want to add your new resolution to each of the Modes lines. It should then look something like this:
    Code:
    Section "Screen"
            Identifier      "Default Screen"
            Device          "ATI Technologies Inc"
            Monitor         "Visual Sensa"
            DefaultDepth    24
    
        Subsection "Display"
            Depth       8
            Modes       "1600x1200" "1280x1024" "1024x768" "800x600" "640x480"
            ViewPort    0 0
        EndSubsection
        Subsection "Display"
            Depth       16
            Modes       "1600x1200" "1280x1024" "1024x768" "800x600" "640x480"
            ViewPort    0 0
        EndSubsection
        Subsection "Display"
            Depth       24
            Modes       "1600x1200" "1280x1024" "1024x768" "800x600" "640x480"
            ViewPort    0 0
        EndSubsection
    EndSection
    By rights I only have to edit the Subsection that has the Depth setting of 24 since the DefaultDepth setting states I'm using a colour depth of 24. But by changing all of them you'll have less problems (if a video game were to temporarily change your settings).

    This should now let you choose the higher resolution using Ubuntu's Screen Resolution application. I did have one problem where it mysteriously dropped my resolution down after I rebooted once. But then it was back to normal the next time I booted again.

    Personally I don't like these auto-configuration systems. It's one problem that Window's suffers from that I don't really want to see in Linux.

    Finally, you don't need to worry about the 32 bit colour depth. My understanding is that Linux's 24 bit colour is the same as Windows 32 bit, it's just different on how they come up with the names.
    Last edited by Spankin Partier; 10-07-2007 at 02:49 PM.

  11. #41
    Joined
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Out there, just read my posts
    Posts
    5,473

    Re: Ubuntu on an older computer

    Quote Originally Posted by Spankin Partier View Post
    Finally, you don't need to worry about the 32 bit colour depth. My understanding is that Linux's 24 bit colour is the same as Windows 32 bit, it's just different on how they come up with the names.
    Really - ?

    That's an entire 8bits missing - I understand where the HDD Manufacturers buggered things up when they said thier drive was "X" Meg. when they used 1000 as a base instead of 1024 like they should have.

    I just simply thought Linux didn't support 32 bit color.....yet......

  12. #42
    Joined
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Southern Ontario
    Age
    45
    Posts
    13,194

    Re: Ubuntu on an older computer

    I read something a year ago or so that was talking about the colour depth. I was pretty sure they just brushed it off as being the same thing. But that was some time ago so I'm not 100% on that. I could be wrong.

  13. #43
    Joined
    Dec 2002
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    70

    Re: Ubuntu on an older computer

    The 8 bits aren't missing but used as padding. What comes out of most digital cameras is 24 bit color RGB. In other words, you're not missing anything; it's all there.
    DFI Expert Bios 04/06; Opty 165 (CCBBE 0615) 9x323/264@1.425Vcore 24/7; G.Skill F1-4000USU2-2GBHZ @ 2.6V; Sapphire X800GTO^2 (16p-stock); OCZ Powerstream 520ADJ; Air-cooled SI-120_Panaflo FBA12G12U 120X38MM @ 115CFM;

  14. #44
    Joined
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Atlanta, Ga
    Posts
    80

    Re: Ubuntu on an older computer

    I added the 1600x1200 to the 24 depth when I did the lasst change and it still doesn't give me that option in the resolution drop down box. I'll go back and change the other depths also and see if that fixes it.

    One more thing as long as I have the Linux experts helping me... How do I get the other buttons on my mouse (like the back button) to work- and how do I set the mouse for single click instead of double click?

  15. #45
    Joined
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Out there, just read my posts
    Posts
    5,473

    Re: Ubuntu on an older computer

    Quote Originally Posted by LurksAtAmdmb View Post
    The 8 bits aren't missing but used as padding. What comes out of most digital cameras is 24 bit color RGB. In other words, you're not missing anything; it's all there.
    Yeah, I seem to remember reading about that.....24 and 32 there is no "visual" difference

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •