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  1. #1
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    The Republican Race To November

    Last edited by jimzinsocal; 02-10-2008 at 06:00 PM.

  2. #2
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    Re: The Republican Race To November

    Just want to try this and the other thread.
    It got confusing in the Super Tuesday thread

  3. #3
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    Re: The Republican Race To November


  4. #4
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    Re: The Republican Race To November

    Rollins was quick to say that the campaign was not accusing the McCain camp of anything untoward, and the issue lies solely with Esser’s call. He added that campaign attorneys have attempted to contact Esser’s lawyers but had not yet received a return phone call.The final results came during the night after the race had been declared too close to call and Washington GOP election officials decided to call it a night. Esser said a final tally would not come until Monday.
    Huckabee acknowledged that he will vote for for the Republican nominee no matter who it is, rejected the notion that he’s on any short list to be McCain’s running mate and refused to give it consideration at this point.

    “I’m not going to be asked. I think it’s pretty evident that there would be a whole lot of people on the list long, long before me, and one of them would say ‘yes,”‘ Huckabee said.
    Some think Chucklebee is the evangelical version of McCain. In any case he’s awfully careful not to get on McCain’s bad side. <wink wink>

  5. #5
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    Re: The Republican Race To November

    What one guy thinks. And Im beginning to agree.
    Im also trying to accept McCain someway. In some context that makes sense. Its difficult but Im trying.

    http://www.bizzyblog.com/2008/02/10/...ext-president/

  6. #6
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    Re: The Republican Race To November

    I am also trying with McCain. I had pretty much decided that there was no way I could vote for him but I heard Ingraham saying that the next president might name 4 justices and I sure would not want that to be Hillary or Obama.
    Brian

  7. #7
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    Re: The Republican Race To November

    McCain Estrangement Syndrome
    Are some of the senator’s supporters trying to drive conservatives away?

    By Andrew C. McCarthy

    Are John McCain’s supporters trying to drive conservatives away from their candidate?
    Senator McCain is the inevitable Republican presidential nominee. He is headed, though, for a defeat of McGovernite dimensions if he can’t sway conservatives to get behind his candidacy. For their part, conservatives don’t want McCain, but even less do they want to spend the next four-to-eight years saying “President Obama,” let alone reliving history with another President Clinton.

    In short, there are the makings here for a modus vivendi, however grudging. Yet, McCain’s admirers appear to think belittling the senator’s good-faith opponents is the way to go. Theirs is a case of the pot calling the kettle “deranged” — and it will prove duly futile.

    Put yourselves in my shoes for a moment. I have not supported Sen. McCain. I admire his perseverance and love of country. Still, I don’t think he is a committed conservative, and his penchant for demonizing all opposition is, to me, extremely off-putting. Protestations to the contrary notwithstanding, there’s nothing delusional about that.

    In fact, as between the two of us, it’s McCain’s supporters who are deluding themselves. I take them at their word, for example, that a hallmark of the senator’s politics is his tenacity on matters of principle. Consequently, I am skeptical of his assurances that he would appoint conservative judges who will apply rather than create law. Why? Because he has a recent, determined history of beseeching federal courts to disregard the First Amendment in furtherance of a dubious campaign-finance scheme in which he believes passionately. Conservative judges would (and have) rejected this scheme, just as they would (and have) rejected another signature McCain position: the extension of Geneva Convention protections for jihadists.

    Now, the appointment of conservative judges is a crucial issue — one McCain posits as central to why we should prefer him to Obama and Clinton. Thus supporters breezily wave off such concerns, maintaining that McCain both promises there will be no issue-based litmus tests for judicial nominees and has conservatives of impeccable legal credentials advising him.

    But for me to conclude McCain would surely appoint conservative judges, I also have to believe campaign-finance and the Geneva Convention weren’t all that big a deal to him after all — a possibility that runs counter to everything McCain’s fans tell us about his fidelity to principle. He’s fought tirelessly for years, in the teeth of blistering criticism, to establish campaign-finance regulations, and I’m now supposed to believe he’ll just shrug his shoulders and meekly name judges who’ll torpedo the whole enterprise — all in the name of upholding a judicial philosophy I’m not even sure he grasps? How exactly is it deranged to have my doubts?



    And, of course, that’s not all. McCain points out that he supported the Supreme Court nominations of Justices Roberts and Alito; but he blocked the appointment of Pentagon general counsel Jim Haynes to the Fourth Circuit, and his “Gang of 14” deal was the death knell for several other Bush judicial nominations. He says he’s learned his lesson on immigration “reform,” but he won’t rule out signing the disastrous McCain/Kennedy bill if it were to cross his desk in the Oval Office. He now says he opposes the Law of the Sea Treaty and its assault on American sovereignty, but he used to be an ardent supporter. He told National Review he didn’t foresee pushing for further campaign-finance legislation, but that was when he was unsuccessfully urging the federal courts to impose further restrictions on speech — and, as president, he would have the power to appoint aggressive Federal Election Commission regulators. He points to his long pro-life record, but his campaign-finance crusade included a years-long effort to suppress the pro-life message, and he supported government funding of stem-cell research that called for destroying human embryos. He claims to be for small government but he contemplates government regulation of everything from light bulbs to professional sports, even as his immigration proposals would crush state health-care and education budgets. While some of McCain’s supporters claim he has consistently opposed tax increases, his Kyoto-style proposal on global warming would actually result in the most enormous tax-increase in American history (while doing little, if anything, about climate change); and, relatedly, though McCain now says he supports making the Bush tax cuts permanent, he was one of their most vigorous opponents.

    To be clear, I have never argued that no true conservative could support McCain — a commonly repeated strawman in the “derangement” indictment. The GOP field featured many accomplished candidates, but it was not a grand set of choices for the Right. The candidate most wedded to our orthodoxy, Sen. Fred Thompson, was late to the race and never really got out of the starting block. Mayor Rudy Giuliani (whom I originally supported) was conservative in many ways but, like McCain, listed serial apostasies in his ledger. The conservatism of Gov. Mitt Romney (to whom I later gravitated) was, in several particulars, of recent vintage, spawning concerns about his authenticity. Gov. Mike Huckabee, a peerless advocate for life and other core social-conservative causes, sounds more like a Democrat on the economy, governed like one when it came to taxes and pardons, and often seems at sea on national-security issues.

    Conservatives had to pick someone. For all his flaws, no candidate could match Sen. McCain’s singular leadership in preventing an American defeat in Iraq. None came close to his heroism in service to the United States. And, in two decades in the Senate, he has sided with conservatives on about four out of every five votes — a rate that cannot camouflage the gravity of his departures but ought not be dismissed out of hand either. I found at least three of the other candidates more appealing than the self-professed “maverick.” That, however, does not mean it was irrational for other conservatives to come to a different conclusion — and though some now prescribe mere opposition to McCain as a form of febrile lunacy, I never suggested otherwise.

    So, when McCain became inevitable on “Super Tuesday,” I resigned myself to reality in short order. That, I’ve always thought, is democracy in America: You do your best to persuade, you hope to win, but you don’t take your ball and go home if you lose.

    There remains a rational case to continue rejecting McCain. We are, after all, electing a government, not just a president. I strongly suspect the conservative movement and Republicans in Congress would perform better if set against a Democrat president than in an uneasy alliance with McCain. Thus it’s not a simple matter of determining whether McCain is superior to Obama or Clinton; the question is whether he is so much better that we should tolerate the heavy cost of a movement and a party less disposed to fight a President McCain on the several flawed policy preferences he shares with Democrats.

    That’s far from a no-brainer. But for me, the question must be resolved in McCain’s favor because of the war. Our troops in harm’s way deserve the best commander-in-chief we have it in our power to give them; the American people deserve the most vigilant protection against a rabid enemy we have it in our power to give them. For these purposes, McCain is measurably superior to Obama and Clinton. That doesn’t mean my reservations are any less real; they are just comparatively (and barely) less important.

    By Wednesday, then, I was resigned to the senator’s being not just the nominee but our nominee. On Thursday, when Gov. Mitt Romney graciously stepped aside, I was glad. I don’t see myself ever being a McCain enthusiast, but by Thursday afternoon, I’d even gotten to the point of offering his campaign what I hoped was constructive advice on taking a leadership role in the current debate over intelligence reform.

    But I’m no longer so sure. McCain’s supporters continue to mock thoughtful, good-faith critics as “deranged.” The principal objects of scorn are such conservative talk-radio icons as Rush Limbaugh, Mark Levin, Laura Ingraham, and Sean Hannity. A number of those folks are friends of mine, and, indeed, I appeared on a couple of their programs in the run-up to Super Tuesday. The discussion wasn’t “deranged.” I’m not deranged, and neither are they.

    The McCain forces assert that ordinary Republican voters are roundly rejecting us naysayers. Really? That claim is even more demonstrably false today than it was a week ago.



    Before last Tuesday, when he became inevitable, about two out of every three Republicans were voting against McCain. This past Saturday, despite having outlasted all meaningful opposition, McCain was humiliated when three out of every four Republicans cast ballots against him in the states of Washington (which he somehow “won”) and Kansas (where he was drubbed). To add insult to insult, McCain was also defeated in Louisiana by the likable but hopeless Huckabee, whose campaign at this point is an eccentricity. For Huck, that is; for the rest of us, it is a window on smoldering dissent — and a harbinger of catastrophe to come when one factors in the Republicans who are staying home while Democrats stampede to the polls in eye-popping numbers.

  8. #8
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    Re: The Republican Race To November

    ^^continue..[I had to chop up the piece to get it to fit]

    http://article.nationalreview.com/?q...RlYWVjMGRiNGY=


    McCain’s only chance, a slim one, is to galvanize the very people his acolytes seem bent on antagonizing. That means allaying deep-seated conservative doubt. A powerful senator not exactly famous for listening to his detractors will need some convincing on that score — some understanding that, as Saturday’s primaries fairly screamed, he’s got a lot more work to do.

    McCain’s fans do their candidate no favors by telling him the only people who can save his candidacy are unhinged.

    And they do themselves no favors. There’s a battle on the horizon for the future of conservatism. On one side are those who revere unchanging principles, especially a healthy suspicion of government. On the other are those who would refine old principles under the guise of adapting them to new situations — those apt to see government more as a force for good than a necessary evil.

    Sen. McCain runs in the latter circles. There, principally, is where he finds his conservative support. If he allows his campaign to become a referendum, pitting the tried-and-true against self-consciously evolved strains of “compassionate” and “national greatness” conservatism, November will look an awful lot like Saturday night.

    Andrew C. McCarthy is an NRO contributing editor. The views expressed above are his own and do not necessarily reflect the views of any organization.
    Last edited by jimzinsocal; 02-11-2008 at 12:41 PM.

  9. #9
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    Re: The Republican Race To November

    Huckabee’s Boomlet Is Over, Can Conservatives Lose Gracefully?


    Want to know who will win the VA, MD and DC GOP primaries handily? It won’t be Huckabee, it will be McCain. The polls show McCain romping in these states who will vote tomorrow see (RCP polls for VA and MD). So when Huckabee is blown out of the South in VA will the delusional fantasies of a Huckabee Boom to stop McCain finally end the conservative revolt? Peggy Noonan asked last week if Hillary can lose graciously - but I want to know if conservatives can?
    The conservative revolt against George Bush and any progress that even hinted at bipartisan sanity (e.g., The Gang of 14 which I and my fellow members in the Coalition of The Chillin’ accurately predicted would not be a disaster for the GOP, but would instead lead to the long string of conservative judges Bush was able to put on the Federal Benches around this country). This anathema against progress became more and more heated through from the nomination of Harriet Miers to Comprehensive Immigration Reform.
    The hyper-partisan right (e.g., ‘true’ conservatives) declared open warfare against their one time coalition allies and predicted victory in their war with moderates (a.k.a RINOs, quislings and traitors). Now that it is clear they are losing the battle for the heart and soul of the GOP with the ascendency of John McCain, will these people lose graciously? I ask them to picture what they wanted to see in their defeated political foes if they had won. Did they want support and respect and backing in their cause? If so, do they not think they owe that kind of response to their one-time allies if they lose the battle? I have my doubts, but I can easily be proven wrong.
    Update: So it seems Gary Bauer has shown how to prove me wrong:
    Conservative Gary Bauer is endorsing Republican presidential candidate John McCain.
    The prominent abortion foe says in a statement that McCain “has dedicated his life to defending human rights around the world, including the rights of the unborn.” The McCain campaign released Bauer’s statement.
    Can the Amnesty Hypochondriacs prove me wrong as well? This is the week to find out. BTW, my prediction on Huckabee’s challenge to the WA caucus is that he will lose.
    The state Republican party posted new numbers late this afternoon, with 93 percent of the precincts reporting. The percentages didn’t change much, with McCain winning about 25 percent of the delegates, Huckabee 24 percent, Paul 21 percent, and Romney 17 percent.
    I suspect the WA GOP knew where the remaining votes were and who was going to win. The fact Huckabee went to court tells me this is a lot to do with media coverage, since his ‘miracle’ chances are slim.
    Posted by AJStrata on Monday, February 11th, 2008 at 11:27 am.

  10. #10
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    Re: The Republican Race To November

    I think that guy ^^ is about half full of crap.


    Firstly I think McCain is a liar and secondly I wouldn’t be expecting him to move right. What he wants is for the base to move left of center where he resides and I don’t think that’s gonna happen in large numbers. He may end up getting the vote from the republican base but he won’t get the support he needs.

    I think many conservative republicans and conservative independents don’t give a lot of credence to what the party leaders and pundits say. I think conservatives and conservative republicans in general are a lot less apt to follow party lines than democratic liberals and liberal independents.

  11. #11
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    Re: The Republican Race To November

    ^^^ I think the call by moderates for conservatives to "buck up" and support McCain is laughable. To expect our votes in the voting booth, when the opposition is Obama or Clinton, that's one thing. They'll most probably get that. But support in the form of helping the campaign, financially or otherwise, the campaign for the snoot that supports taxes for global warming and amnesty for illegal aliens? What are the moderates smoking?

    Are we to look away from the make-up of McCain's campaign staff and swallow promises of border security? I don't think so. His slam on Alito? Are we to act as if it didn't happen or that it was disingenuous? I don't think so. Are we to scoot his McCain/Fiengold crap under the rug? I don't think so.

    For me? It all started way back in the days of Lincoln Savings and Loan and his membership in the Keating Five. That was never explained and it was a larger financial kaboozle than the present scam/idiocy/bulldung sub-prime mortgage fiasco. Funny how nobody even mentions it any more.

    In the end, us conservatives will put an "X" next to McCain rather than next to Obama or Clinton. But to expect support as in sending money or helping to do the groundwork of McCain's campaign? Hell no. Its just not going to happen. Every time he declares himself a conservative, I cringe. When Dubbya declares McCain is a conservative, I understand why we don't have border security or reduced federal spending.

    Now I know there's gonna be a plethora of articles and opinion pieces written by moderates that decry the attitudes of conservatives for not "going along" with the party's selection of McCain... and they can write until their fingers turn blue. I'll still never support McCain with more than an "X' next to his name. He's an old school backroom dealmaker... exactly what we don't need... and a senator... another thing we don't need.

    Its amazing that with all the talk of Dubbya's low opinion polls, we have three candidates left... all from the one pool that has a lower opinion rating than that of the president. The one source of politicians that is deemed to have under-performed and in truth, have failed in their duties as representatives of the populace, is the only source for this term's group of candidates. What in hell were we thinking?

  12. #12
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    Re: The Republican Race To November

    ^^^ That’s dead-nuts on target…

    You said what I think a lot more eloquently than I did.

  13. #13
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    Re: The Republican Race To November

    ^^You and tucker. Were on the same page I think. I threw in the second one for flavor.

    Pretty much I get where McCarthy is coming from....which is essentially..."dont shit on us and expect any support"


    "McCain’s only chance, a slim one, is to galvanize the very people his acolytes seem bent on antagonizing. That means allaying deep-seated conservative doubt. A powerful senator not exactly famous for listening to his detractors will need some convincing on that score — some understanding that, as Saturday’s primaries fairly screamed, he’s got a lot more work to do.

    McCain’s fans do their candidate no favors by telling him the only people who can save his candidacy are unhinged."

  14. #14
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    Re: The Republican Race To November



    Oh boy. My attitude has suddenly turned a 180. Right.

    Jeb for McCain [Byron York]

    From the McCain campaign:

    ARLINGTON, VA — U.S. Senator John McCain's presidential campaign today announced that former Florida Governor Jeb Bush has endorsed John McCain for president.

    "John McCain is a patriot and devoted conservative leader," said Governor Bush. "Like no other candidate in the field, John McCain has made tremendous sacrifices for this nation. He is beholden to no interest other than that of the public good. He is determined and steadfast in his commitment to reducing the burden of high taxes, restoring the people's trust in their government, and winning the war against radical Islamic extremists. It is with pride that I announce my endorsement of John McCain for president."
    02/11 02:25 PM






    That + $2.25 might get you a coffee.

  15. #15
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    Re: The Republican Race To November

    He is beholden to no interest other than that of the public good. He is determined and steadfast in his commitment to reducing the burden of high taxes, restoring the people's trust in their government

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