Page 3 of 55 FirstFirst 12345671353 ... LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 820
  1. #31
    Joined
    May 2002
    Location
    Twain Harte, CA
    Posts
    20,421

    Re: The Republican Race To November

    Romney endorsed McCain today.

    edit: you're fast, Orang...

  2. #32
    Joined
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    74,682

    Re: The Republican Race To November

    Quote Originally Posted by Orangutan View Post
    Breaking News:
    Thats going to have to end it for Huckabee I assume. Mitt's delegates go with the endorsement I believe.

  3. #33
    Joined
    Mar 2002
    Location
    California
    Posts
    26,255

    Re: The Republican Race To November

    Quote Originally Posted by jimzinsocal View Post
    Only took them what.. a decade? Now that it looks less like Hil will be the nominee.. I guess we can expect to see NPR actually running stories years old about her. NPR..
    "The most dangerous myth is the demagoguery that business can be made to pay a larger share, thus relieving the individual. Politicians preaching this are either deliberately dishonest, or economically illiterate, and either one should scare us...
    Only people pay taxes, and people pay as consumers every tax that is assessed against a business."


    -The Gipper


  4. #34
    Joined
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    74,682

    Re: The Republican Race To November

    Quote Originally Posted by jimzinsocal View Post
    Thats going to have to end it for Huckabee I assume. Mitt's delegates go with the endorsement I believe.
    If what I suspect is true? Pretty smooth way to get Huckabee out.
    If McCain picks up Romney's delegates? 200+ There is no way or reason for Huck to persist.



    just saw

    Romney had collected 286 delegates before he suspended his campaign two weeks ago.
    Those delegates would give McCain 1,013 total delegates, 78 short of securing the nomination.
    Romney is expected to announce his endorsement of the senator from Arizona at a news conference in Boston, Massachusetts, at 3:30 ET. E-mail to a friend
    Last edited by jimzinsocal; 02-14-2008 at 01:53 PM.

  5. #35
    Joined
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Corruptfornia
    Posts
    3,785

    Re: The Republican Race To November

    Yea I think my guy's had it. Some choice now...

  6. #36
    Joined
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    74,682

    Re: The Republican Race To November

    ^^I sure understand that. I was a Goldwater and Ross Perot fan in years gone by. Its never fun.

  7. #37
    Joined
    May 2002
    Location
    Twain Harte, CA
    Posts
    20,421

    Re: The Republican Race To November

    Quote Originally Posted by jimzinsocal View Post
    If what I suspect is true? Pretty smooth way to get Huckabee out.
    It seems to be a counter to Huck's trying to be the first second... or maybe that's just my active numbers based imagination.

  8. #38
    Joined
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    74,682

    Re: The Republican Race To November

    ^^I figure Huckabee has a way out now. Mitt looks like the hero for ending a pointless competition and Huck has a face saving way out of it all
    And McCain diesnt have to seem like a bastage for confronting Huckabee directly

    And Romney has to get something out of this.
    I dont think Veep.
    Thats for a woman I suspect.
    Or maybe Colin Powell if the need is there.
    Last edited by jimzinsocal; 02-14-2008 at 02:07 PM.

  9. #39
    Joined
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    74,682

    Re: The Republican Race To November

    I suspect for typical "conservative" Republicans?
    Its going to be one of those years.
    We dont get the "perfect" candidate.

    But thinking back to 2000 and 2004?
    That shouldnt be a shock.
    Geo Bush is /was hardly what Id call "perfect"
    in the eyes of a conservative.
    But? He won.
    And mostly thats the point.
    IMO

    The alternative to McCain is really painfull.

  10. #40
    Joined
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    74,682

    Re: The Republican Race To November

    JOHN MCCAIN, HORSERACE
    Wisconsin Poll: Democrats No Better on Iraq Than Bush
    Some eye-opening polls result from Strategic Vision in Wisconsin:
    3. Do you approve or disapprove of President Bush's handling of the war in Iraq?
    Approve 23%
    Disapprove 68%
    Undecided 9%
    8. Do you approve or disapprove of the way Congress is performing its job?
    Approve 15%
    Disapprove 74%
    Undecided 11%
    To me, this was the real eye-opener:
    7. Do you believe that Democrats in Congress have a better plan to resolve the Iraq War then President Bush?
    Yes 18%
    No 71%
    Undecided 11%
    Iraq, no longer a winning issue for Congressional Democrats. In that hawkish, hard-right state of Wisconsin. (And as one of my campaign sources points out, that question should soon shift to, "Do you believe that Democrats in Congress have a better plan to resolve the Iraq War than John McCain?")
    Strategic Vision also asked presidential preference, and Wisconsin Republicans favor John McCain (45 percent) to Mike Huckabee (27 percent) and Ron Paul (7 percent).
    Among Democrats, it's Obama 45 percent, Hillary 41 percent, and 14 percent undecided. Yet Hillary's not going to the state until Saturday!

    02/13 11:00 AM

  11. #41
    Joined
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    74,682

    Re: The Republican Race To November


  12. #42
    Joined
    Mar 2002
    Location
    California
    Posts
    26,255

    Re: The Republican Race To November

    Questions For John McCain

    WASHINGTON -- Foreign policy has slipped to the periphery of presidential politics, displaced by a nonexistent recession as the voters' preoccupation. Come autumn, however, Iraq and Iran might be central subjects, Iraq as a bigger problem for the Democratic nominee than for John McCain, and Iran as a problem for McCain. And the presidency might be won by the candidate who embraces a modest conception of that office.

    Regarding Iraq, Democrats have won a retrospective argument: Most Americans regret the invasion and execrate the bungled aftermath. But that will not enable the Democratic nominee to argue prospectively that what America's sacrifices have achieved should be put at risk by the essentially unconditional withdrawal of forces that both Democratic candidates promise.

    Nancy Pelosi says the surge has not "produced the desired effect." "The" effect? The surge has produced many desired effects, including a pacification that is a prerequisite for the effect -- political reconciliation -- to which Pelosi refers.

    The Democratic nominee will try to make a mountain out of McCain's molehill of an assertion that it would be "fine" with him if some U.S. forces are in Iraq for "maybe 100" years, if Americans are not being harmed. Voters are not seething or even restive because U.S. forces have been in Japan and Germany for 63 years and in South Korea for 58. McCain's real vulnerabilities are related to four questions about Iran and one about Iraq. By answering all five he will reveal what constitutional limits -- if any -- he accepts on the powers of the presidency regarding foreign and military policies.

    First, he says war with Iran would be less dreadful than an Iran with nuclear arms. Why does he think, as his statement implies, that a nuclear Iran would be, unlike the Soviet Union, undeterrable and not susceptible to long-term containment until internal dynamics alter the regime?

    Second, many hundreds of bombing sorties -- serious warfare -- would be required to justify confidence that Iran's nuclear program had been incapacitated for the foreseeable future. Does McCain believe that a president is constitutionally empowered to launch such a protracted preventive war without congressional authorization?

    Third, why would any president not repelling a sudden attack want to enter the pitch-black forest of war unaccompanied by the other political branch of government?

    Fourth, President Bush has spoken of the importance of preventing Iran from having "the knowledge necessary to make a nuclear weapon." Does McCain think it is feasible and imperative to prevent, or destroy, such "knowledge"?

    The fifth question concerns Iraq and Congress' constitutional role in the conduct of foreign policy. On Nov. 26, 2007, Bush and Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki issued a "Declaration of Principles for a Long-Term Relationship of Cooperation and Friendship." Pursuant to this declaration, a status of forces agreement -- or perhaps something substantially more sweeping than such agreements often are -- is to be completed by July 31. The declaration says that the agreement will include "security assurances and commitments" requiring the United States to defend Iraq "against internal and external threats," and to "support" Iraq's attempts to "defeat and uproot" all "terrorist groups," including "al-Qaeda, Saddamists, and all other outlaw groups," and to "destroy their logistical networks and their sources of finance."

    In a Dec. 19 letter to the president, Sen. Joe Biden, chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee, said constitutional law and "over 200 years of practice" establish that such an agreement would require congressional authorization in the form of a treaty, statute or concurrent resolution by both houses. Sen. Hillary Clinton has introduced, and Sen. Barack Obama is co-sponsoring, legislation to deny funds to implement any such agreement that is not approved by Congress. Hundreds of such agreements, major (e.g., NATO) and minor (the Reagan administration's security commitment to the Marshall Islands and Micronesia), have been submitted to Congress. Does McCain agree with Clinton and Obama?

    "War," wrote Randolph Bourne in 1918, "is the health of the state." War especially enhances presidential power, which probably is one reason why Theodore Roosevelt, Bourne's contemporary and one of McCain's heroes, relished war. "No triumph of peace," Roosevelt said, "is quite so great as the supreme triumphs of war." Roosevelt, who also said, "I don't think that any harm comes from the concentration of power in one man's hands," was the archetype of the modern, hyperkinetic president.

    McCain, who sometimes seems to regard his enthusiasms and disgusts as self-legitimizing and grounds for government action, probably would be TR's sort of president. The Democratic nominee will probe, and voters have nine months to ponder, the implications of that probability.
    "The most dangerous myth is the demagoguery that business can be made to pay a larger share, thus relieving the individual. Politicians preaching this are either deliberately dishonest, or economically illiterate, and either one should scare us...
    Only people pay taxes, and people pay as consumers every tax that is assessed against a business."


    -The Gipper


  13. #43
    Joined
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    74,682

    Re: The Republican Race To November

    Just listened to McCain. He actually made sense.

  14. #44
    Joined
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    74,682

    Re: The Republican Race To November

    I hope you guys are listening to Obama's Santa speech.

    quite the laundry list of grievances

    roll back the Bush Tax cuts
    etc
    etc
    etc

    Sounds like any relative high wage earner can figure on asking the Feds what we have left
    for ourselves.
    Last edited by jimzinsocal; 02-19-2008 at 10:08 PM.

  15. #45
    Joined
    Jun 2004
    Location
    In a house
    Posts
    5,755

    Re: The Republican Race To November

    ^^ He sure is promising a lot I dont think he cant actually come thru on 90% of what he promises

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •