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  1. #1
    Joined
    Jun 2005
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    7

    Hard drives - is bigger better?

    I'm about to build a new rig and was wondering if there's a downside to larger HDs. The price isn't much of a factor anymore and I already have a 320gb external and a 120gb spare drive that I will be using as storage so I don't really need a huge main drive as it will be primarily for the OS and programs. Generally speaking - are factors such as fragmentation, seek time, reliability, etc. better with smaller drives or does it not make a difference - in which case I'll probably just go for a 500gb+(overkill) drive?
    Thanks

  2. #2
    Joined
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    Re: Hard drives - is bigger better?

    just split it up into a c drive for windows and rest for data

    that way a defrag on the windows part will not take a life time
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  3. #3
    Joined
    Mar 2003
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    Re: Hard drives - is bigger better?

    'better' features include bigger cache (32mb) and Perpendicular Magnetic Recording (PMR), RPM and a high MTTF (mean time to failure)

    look for these - size is irrelevant

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  4. #4
    Joined
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    Re: Hard drives - is bigger better?

    yeah, size isn't the key factor really in a system drive especially. i'm running a 74 gb raptor for my system drive and it is plenty of space for only windows and installed programs like games and such.

    however..... that being said. Western Digital has a killer hard drive out that is 300 gb. it is the velociraptor drive. it's a little spendy... but a 300 gb 10,000 rpm drive is just sweet. that and it's a raptor on the newer SATA 300 interface. so face seek times meet fast transfer speeds. awesome drive. a little spendy... but still. dang sweet.

    but for normal drives in the 7,200 rpm market.... the things that dnd listed are the things to look for. Generally enterprise level drives will have a substantially longer listed drive life and will be built with higher grade parts as they are designed for server environments and 24/7 operation. however, they are more spendy..... I've been quite happy with my non enterprise class 320 gb seagate 7,200.10 drive as a data disk.

    by the way.... i wouldn't reccommend using one hard drive for your system and data storage... that way your computer is sending i/o requests from windows and you trying to get at your data to the same drive. with two physically seperate drives, you are getting not only data security (i.e. - if windows fails, format c and you don't loose your data, yeah, you can do this with partitions too.....) but also if the hard drive fails.... you've lost windows and your data at the same time, and unless you're backing up things to another hard drive, you're much more hosed... the performance increase is good too. then windows can do it's thing and you can do whatever with your data and not have your hard drive going all over the place trying to do what windows wants and what you want at the same time.

  5. #5
    Joined
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    Re: Hard drives - is bigger better?

    bigger can mean denser platters, so bigger can be better in a way.

    also drives are super cheap, you can get 500gb for under 100 bucks, i believe i've seen a 750gb for under 100 as well.

    i'm now using a 500gb seagate 7200.10 for my vista drive, i recently got a free copy of vista and did not wish to partition any of my current drives (partitioning can reduce performance) and also did not want to get rid of my xp install, so i headed to best buy and this was the best deal they had, besides i've used many seagate drives in the past and they've all been great. i also didn't want to wait for one to come in the mail, otherwise i surely could have paid less.

    all in all it gets the job done, it's quite speedy, don't notice any real difference between it and my old 74gb raptor, seek time is slower than the raptor but i'd be hard pressed to pick out which drive is which in a blind test.

    i'd say a drive in the 320gb range should be enough, but if you find a good deal on something bigger i say why not.

    some may suggest a raptor but i'd say pass on those, a good recent 7200 rpm drive will do you just fine
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  6. #6
    Joined
    Jun 2005
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    7

    Re: Hard drives - is bigger better?

    Thanks for your responses.
    Since low/no noise is important to me I'll probably skip the Raptor. I've always owned Seagate drives mainly because they're reputed to be the quietest. The only one that ever failed(DOA) was an external 320gb FreeAgent but it was quickly replaced, free of charge, by a newer model and has been without problems for almost a year. I read a review in which the Seagate ES version appeared rather disappointing so since I keep very little data on my main(OS) drive I'll most likely be picking up a regular 250-320gb 7200.11.

  7. #7
    Joined
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Mumbai, India
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    1,084

    Re: Hard drives - is bigger better?

    The WD drives are cooler and quieter than the Seagates. They are just slightly slower, but still pretty snappy. The Hitachis are amazing drives, but they run a little hot and may be a little less reliable. I am torn between Seagate and WD for all my drives, so I use the larger WD drives and for smaller drives I go to Seagates.

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