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  1. #1
    Joined
    May 2001
    Posts
    11,534

    Why doesn't your memory default to the advertised speed?

    I only mean to say we should hold off judgment on the quality of the memory, the CPU's memory controller, or the motherboard before understanding the facts. If the advertised speed is a fully standardized speed and the motherboard is current, then it probably shouldn't happen. *Probably* As compatibility may be playing a role if you didn't fully research.

    This problem can happen because the memory can run at a very high speed, but the speed is not standardized by the standards group yet. It could be that the modules you bought were ahead of their time, and the system you're using them in actually requires you to overclock them to reach that speed, likely as a direct result of standardization or system limitations.

    That said the reason it didn't boot right up to its high dollar advertised speed is sometimes a bit complicated. Some memory controllers are different than others, and can use memory more efficiently, which may or may not have an effect on how high you can clock your memory. Motherboards are all different and may have slight variations in the actual voltage they supply to the modules. Quite literally, it's the motherboard that has the most control over what your system detects and sets as default. This is a good thing, because if your system requires a little more voltage for any number of unknown reasons, you will at least be able to get into the BIOS to raise the memory voltage. If the motherboard fails to POST because it can't run at insane speeds with default low voltage, then you're dead in the water. So instead, the motherboard has given you a starter point. Two ways to safely do so: Contact the memory manufacturer who can tell you the optimum voltage for the speed you're expecting, or do your own independent research, which we should be fairly familiar with if we're hobby builders or genuine techs.

    Probably what's going to happen is you're going to bump up to a specific voltage (after getting a solid answer) that is still within maximum DDR3/4/5 specification whatever it is at the time, and then set the memory speed to that higher clock. Should you have to do that? Maybe, because there have consistently been several beyond spec. rated memory on the market for many years. These modules are usually of the highest quality.

    But none of this is to say it could never be a component defect or quality problem. I'm just saying hold off judgement before understanding your system fully. Best to research all of this before buying. Memory manufacturers are sometimes very helpful in this. Either way, don't hesitate to post in the forums.
    Last edited by notdrugged; 05-13-2019 at 05:09 AM.
    ...Does anybody else feel like Congress simply bailed themselves out? Isn't that what they really mean by a bailout?

  2. #2
    Joined
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Hamilton, On, Can
    Age
    37
    Posts
    827

    Re: Why doesn't your memory default to the advertised speed?

    DDR3 SDRAM Reading

    Would like to add Intel XMP (Introduced 2008) Information.
    Intel XMP (Extreme Memory Profile) profiles are tested and verified to run on Intel based Motherboards/Chipsets from different vendors and conform to all JEDEC standards regarding to their specified speeds (up to 1600MHz). XMP is an overclocked memory profile that is designed for the 'Noob' in mind to not have to worry about adjusting various settings portion of the OC process and is guaranteed to function at the speed specified. Major manufacturers (initially Corsair, Kingston, and Micron) have Intel certified XMP profiles embeded into their enthusiast products and have been tested with a variety of setups and motherboard vendors. An increasing number of Memory manufacturers have adopted Intel XMP. Further Reading Intel's XMP webpage
    Last edited by JSLEnterprises; 04-14-2010 at 04:44 PM. Reason: This thread should be stickied. Excellent read.
    ..::J.S.L::..


    Email: jsl@jslenterprises.net

  3. #3
    Joined
    May 2001
    Posts
    11,534

    Re: Why doesn't your memory default to the advertised speed?

    Thanks for the additional information. That's very good to know. I didn't even know what XMP was. Just how long it's been since I've really been up on things.
    ...Does anybody else feel like Congress simply bailed themselves out? Isn't that what they really mean by a bailout?

  4. #4
    Joined
    Jun 2001
    Location
    San Fran EX NYC
    Age
    48
    Posts
    4,278

    Re: Why doesn't your memory default to the advertised speed?

    I just put this setup together last week
    I have 1800 DDR3(ASUS Sabertooth x58 MB)
    ram speeds 1066 1333 1600 no 1800 but 1866 and higher
    It reads if locked CPU DDR 800 and 1066 only can be used
    I'm at 1866 no troubles all voltages stock but ram 1.70 from 1.65
    Last edited by Fle@B@gL@ne; 10-18-2010 at 09:28 AM.
    ASUS Sabertoothz77 T.U.F Series
    Intel i7 3770K 3.5@4.2 4/8 8mb
    32GB DDR 1600 Overclocked Corsair Vengence
    2 Superclocked EVGA GTX 680s instead stock 1008/6008 @1088/6200 befoe I oc it
    2 raid 0 120x2 SSD Corsair Force GT and 60x2 SSD OCZ A III 1 x SSD to speed up external 2TB
    24in 19by12 32in & 65in 1900by1080P
    Logitech Z5500 5.1 505 watt all optical on SB X-fi 5.1 external

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