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  1. #1
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    Red face Real Noobie Question About Wireless.....

    Okay, lets say I get a wireless router. It has 4 "hard points" for four dedicated lines........how many wireless items can be run also??

    Hardware example: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...-388-_-Product

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  2. #2
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    Re: Real Noobie Question About Wireless.....

    Wireless is a tricky beast as its not simply a hardware issue.

    Your sharing channels with every other wireless device in the area, and there are non-wifi devices that can interfere with it.

    It also depends on what your using the device for.

  3. #3
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    Re: Real Noobie Question About Wireless.....

    In theroy I would like to run 2 - 3 items hardwired and then a lappy, pc, printer, and bluray player wireless........

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  4. #4
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    Re: Real Noobie Question About Wireless.....

    The blu-ray player generally isn't a good idea over wireless, especially when doing firmware updates.

    Printers are a bit better, but generally better hardwired.

    PC and the lappy should generally be ok, but you need to test out the area where they will be to see if it meets your needs.

  5. #5
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    Re: Real Noobie Question About Wireless.....

    Its usually best to try to put the router in a central location of the house. This way you'll have the best chance of broadcasting to all the rooms. My current house is a single story bungalow with a finished basement. So I've placed my router in a central room in the basement. It allows for good range on the main floor, without broadcasting too far off of the property.

    I've had up to four laptops on my network wirelessly at the same time. Couple doing Youtube, and the others just general surfing. And that's on a wireless G system. File transfer speeds were of course slow, but it could handle several internet feeds at the same time without a problem.
    Last edited by Spankin Partier; 10-08-2010 at 02:35 AM.

  6. #6
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    Re: Real Noobie Question About Wireless.....

    In theory, there are two address spaces reserved for private networks, 192.168.y.z and 10.x.y.z. Most routers will use the 192.168.y.z, where y is 0 or 1. Using 255.255.255.0 as the mask, you'll get 256 IP's, and after you substract the broadcast address, the network address, the wifi adapter address, you're left with 253 available IP's. The four UTP ports are not limited to 4 IP's, you can connect cascading switches/hubs and use all the IP's that way.

    Some routers accept 255.255.0.0 as a netmask, so you'll get 65536 IP's, and you apply the same rules as above.

    If you're using the 10.x.y.z you can have over 16 million IP's (16777216 or so).

    A caveat is if you're using the integrated DHCP server. On a consumer grade product it will be limited to 256 addresses (a little less then that actually), but it's not a rule. To overcome this problem, always assign IP's manually.

    Technically there is another address space available, 172.16.y.z - 172.25.y.z, but it's uncommon for SOHO products. Just do a search for "C class" to get all the details.

    In reality
    , the router's CPU and RAM are limited to a certain amount, and managing more then a couple of hundred concurrent connections will slow down and/or temporarily brick the router, because all these connections have to be managed, and sometimes it can run out of available RAM. So it depends on how many clients you have and what exactly they are doing with the connection at that time.
    Last edited by Sihastru; 10-08-2010 at 12:36 PM.
    There are more things in heaven and earth then are dreamt of in your philosophy.

  7. #7
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    Re: Real Noobie Question About Wireless.....



    Aaaaaaaaaaaa, for right now 1 x printer, possible 2 x desktops, 1 x lappy, and the 1 x blu ray that Bryan reccomends to "hard wire".

    Oh and as most around here know I'm majorly software challenged! So Sihastru, 95% of what you said sadly went WAY over my head.
    Last edited by jedihobbit; 10-14-2010 at 09:47 PM. Reason: mispelink

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  8. #8
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    Re: Real Noobie Question About Wireless.....

    Sorry.

    So any cheap home router should accept at least 253 "thinghies" connected to it, but if any of those "thinghies" use the connection for some massive transfers, like bit torrent for example, the rest of the "thinghies" will suffer. Effects can be increased latency and decreased available bandwidth, but it can also lead to dropped/refused connections and ultimately you might need to power cycle the router to make it work again (depends on the quality of the router, some will take high workloads without any problem).

    Any device that needs high bandwidth (many MB/s) should be connected using an UTP cable, because wifi is always "fussy" and will not give you the best experience if you'd need to stream multiple full HD movies and have a download in background somewhere, and copy some files from one computer to the another.

    The printer, the two destops and the bluray should be most of the time in the same place, so having UTP cables wired to them should be possible (unless you really hate UTP cables), while the laptop is by nature a portable device and will move around a lot, so that needs to be on the wifi.
    There are more things in heaven and earth then are dreamt of in your philosophy.

  9. #9
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    Re: Real Noobie Question About Wireless.....

    Good job!!

    Actually location may be the issue on some in relation to the router.......

    Why F@H?? Click me!
    As of 07/28/11
    Oz1a v2.0 >> XFX MDA72P7509 750a, PI X2 8870BE, 2 x XFX GTS250, WD 250GB, F2-8500CL5D-2GBPK, Tt TR2 600W, XP Pro SP3

  10. #10
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    Thumbs up Re: Real Noobie Question About Wireless.....

    Quote Originally Posted by Sihastru View Post
    In theory, there are two address spaces reserved for private networks, 192.168.y.z and 10.x.y.z. Most routers will use the 192.168.y.z, where y is 0 or 1. Using 255.255.255.0 as the mask, you'll get 256 IP's, and after you substract the broadcast address, the network address, the wifi adapter address, you're left with 253 available IP's. The four UTP ports are not limited to 4 IP's, you can connect cascading switches/hubs and use all the IP's that way.

    Some routers accept 255.255.0.0 as a netmask, so you'll get 65536 IP's, and you apply the same rules as above.

    If you're using the 10.x.y.z you can have over 16 million IP's (16777216 or so).

    A caveat is if you're using the integrated DHCP server. On a consumer grade product it will be limited to 256 addresses (a little less then that actually), but it's not a rule. To overcome this problem, always assign IP's manually.

    Technically there is another address space available, 172.16.y.z - 172.25.y.z, but it's uncommon for SOHO products. Just do a search for "C class" to get all the details.

    In reality
    , the router's CPU and RAM are limited to a certain amount, and managing more then a couple of hundred concurrent connections will slow down and/or temporarily brick the router, because all these connections have to be managed, and sometimes it can run out of available RAM. So it depends on how many clients you have and what exactly they are doing with the connection at that time.

    Wow! That was quite an answer, sir! My is up to you, it's always good to learn new things
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