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  1. #1
    Joined
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    Question Making straight through RJ45 with solid

    Hi
    I'm not sure if I'm going about this right. I'm running some cat6 UTP "solid" Ethernet cable through the house. I'm wondering what most people do to the modem end of the cables after the wall Keys are hooked up? Do they make their own ends, or use some kind of a patch panel?

    I thought about using an RJ45 punch tool to make the ends of the raw cable into jacks for the modem side, but it's not that easy.
    There are 8 tinny holes I'm trying to get the lines though, and because this is solid, not stranded line, it's not that easy. My straight through connectors came with the spool of the solid wire I'm using. There's a little header plastic part that came with the straight through RJ45 jacks that I'm guessing is used to aid in lining up the wires, but I can't seem to get it to line up, or see the holes inside for that matter. The videos I've seen with people demonstrating stranded wire looks somewhat easy. Is there some kind of tool for this application geared more towards solid wire? Or is a patch panel better for these kinds of network runs?

    EDIT
    Ok, I'm definitely going to be using a patch panel for this.
    I don't remember seeing this new hole arrangement in the RJ45 ends, and for the life of me I can't get the wires though the holes in the jack even after using the bridge that comes with the jacks. Someone mentioned that they don't recommend people making their own cables for Cat6 anymore because the standards are higher, although I know Cat6 doesn't really have a standard atm.
    Here is an example of what I'm referring to.
    Even after you put the wires through the bridge (on the left of image) you still have 8 more holes inside the connector to put the wires through. I can't even see the holes. Were the holes always staggered like that?
    Last edited by Starstreams; 06-23-2011 at 08:31 PM.

  2. #2
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    Re: Making straight through RJ45 with solid

    Not sure if this is what you are looking for.

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  3. #3
    Joined
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    Location
    Australia
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    14,223

    Re: Making straight through RJ45 with solid

    Quote Originally Posted by Starstreams View Post
    Hi
    I'm not sure if I'm going about this right. I'm running some cat6 UTP "solid" Ethernet cable through the house. I'm wondering what most people do to the modem end of the cables after the wall Keys are hooked up? Do they make their own ends, or use some kind of a patch panel?

    I thought about using an RJ45 punch tool to make the ends of the raw cable into jacks for the modem side, but it's not that easy.
    There are 8 tinny holes I'm trying to get the lines though, and because this is solid, not stranded line, it's not that easy. My straight through connectors came with the spool of the solid wire I'm using. There's a little header plastic part that came with the straight through RJ45 jacks that I'm guessing is used to aid in lining up the wires, but I can't seem to get it to line up, or see the holes inside for that matter. The videos I've seen with people demonstrating stranded wire looks somewhat easy. Is there some kind of tool for this application geared more towards solid wire? Or is a patch panel better for these kinds of network runs?

    EDIT
    Ok, I'm definitely going to be using a patch panel for this.
    I don't remember seeing this new hole arrangement in the RJ45 ends, and for the life of me I can't get the wires though the holes in the jack even after using the bridge that comes with the jacks. Someone mentioned that they don't recommend people making their own cables for Cat6 anymore because the standards are higher, although I know Cat6 doesn't really have a standard atm.
    Here is an example of what I'm referring to.
    Even after you put the wires through the bridge (on the left of image) you still have 8 more holes inside the connector to put the wires through. I can't even see the holes. Were the holes always staggered like that?
    FWIW, jacks = sockets. What you're referring to is modudular plugs

    A sensible setup would be to terminate the fixed cables to a patch panel so that you have jacks (sockets) at either end and then use patch cords from the patch panel to the switch/router. Not a good idea to have tails hanging out of the wall with plugs on the end of them. Especially with solid conductors. If they get damaged, you're looking at having to do a termination inside the wall or replacing the cable. Better to protect the permanent, fixed cable by only using jacks on either end of it.

    Fixed/concealed cabling regulation in the USA is handled at state level - you should check out your state's telecomms cabling laws. Most states allow anyone to do it, some states are regulated and have safety requirements, including having a qualified installer run them. In any case, you should be aware of spacing your data cable away from potential safety hazards at any point along your cable run and especially where your terminations are. If they're terminated near mains power points, all it takes is for one bare conductor from either termination to touch a bare conductor on the other and then your data points become live with mains power. Think electrocution and fire. Mains power, lightning conductors, other earthing cables, gas, rodents and bugs (there are more hazards too). Dodgy DIY cabling is a good excuse for insurance companies to back out of a claim. Sure it's unlikely to happen, but best to try and prevent it in the first place

    You only really need 5cm separation or some form of insulation (ie. conduit) along the cable length and at least triple that distance where your terminations are, but the further the better. Another good reason to make sure they're well separated or insulated is the possibility of electrical interference, induction and cross-talk.

    The holes are staggered on CAT6 mod plugs. They weren't on CAT5. It's part of the CAT6/CAT6a specification designed to separate each conductor further from the others in order to reduce the chance of cross-talk (yes, CAT6/6a is standardised internationally, by a few different standards bodies). The standard pinouts are TIA/EIA 568A or 568B. As long as both ends have the same pinouts, it doesn't really matter. Most cablers prefer to use pre-terminated patch cords because CAT6 mod plugs are fiddly and time consuming. Not only that, but the biggest obstacle to achieving true Gigabit-capable cabling is faulty terminations. That also applies to punch-down terminations on wall jacks and patch panels.

    Google Search: TIA/EIA 568A 568B

    Quote Originally Posted by Eldest_One View Post
    Not sure if this is what you are looking for.

    That's a good guide, but a couple of points to consider. Don't just look at the side of the mod plug when pushing the conductors in. Better to look at the end of the plug to ensure that all eight conductors are as far in as they can be. Secondly, the "tester" they refer to is simply a "validator". It doesn't ensure that the cable is working "properly". All it does is check that there is basic continuity in each conductor and check that the conductors are in correct sequence. They can pass a cable and you still get issues with gigabit performance, leaving you wondering where the fault is. To check CAT6 cabling properly, you'd need a "qualifier", such as a Fluke Cable IQ, DTX-1800 or similar (sorry - just having a rant ). That said, normally validators are good enough for basic use, but again with CAT6 and higher, you're better off buying pre-terminated patch cords so you should only have to worry about the fixed cabling.

    Hope that helps a bit

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