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  1. #1
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    Operation Fast and Furious scandal

    Been following this story for a bit...

    Fast and Furious Backpedaling at the Department of Justice

    We haven't written much about the Operation Fast and Furious scandal, which reportedly is about to lead to the resignation of the Acting Director of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms. The best way to get a handle on the controversy is by reading the Joint Staff Report that was prepared for Congressman Issa's Committee on Oversight and Government Reform and Senator Grassley of the Senate Judiciary Committee, and was released last Tuesday. The report is based on testimony taken from ATF agents and, to a lesser extent, on documents produced to Issa's committee by ATF.

    The report relates that in the fall of 2009, the Department of Justice "developed a risky new strategy to combat gun trafficking along the Southwest Border," which was implemented by ATF, a part of the Justice Department. The new strategy was called "Operation Fast and Furious."

    The operation's goal was to establish a nexus between straw purchasers of assault-style weapons in the United States and Mexican drug-trafficking organizations (DTOs) operating on both sides of the United States-Mexico border.
    "Straw purchasers" are people who buy guns from gun shops for the purpose of reselling them to criminal organizations. At the time when Fast and Furious began, a number of straw purchasers were known or suspected in the Southwest. The usual course, prior to that operation, had been to surveil the suspected straw purchasers as they bought weapons and to keep them under surveillance until they tried to sell or otherwise dispose of the weapons. At that point, an arrest would be made and the weapons recovered. Or, in the alternative, they could arrest the straw purchaser for "lying and buying," making false representations in connection with his gun purchases, and try to "flip" the straw purchaser to lead them to other drug gang members. According to the agents who testified before Issa's committee, "ATF's long-standing policy has been not to knowingly allow guns to 'walk' into the hands of criminals." It was this policy that was changed by the Fast and Furious program.

    Under DOJ's new strategy, gun shop owners would be given the names of suspected straw purchasers and would report to ATF the serial numbers of guns that they sold to those purchasers. However, the purchasers themselves were not kept under surveillance and no effort was made to stop them from transferring the guns to Mexican drug gangs. On the contrary, such transfers were the hoped-for result, on the theory that identifying the guns when they later turned up at crime scenes in Mexico or on the U.S. side of the border would "create a 'nexus' between the drug cartels and the straw purchasers." Under this theory, approximately 2,000 AK-47s and other weapons were allowed to pass from known straw purchasers into the hands of the drug cartels.

    It is difficult to understand how DOJ thought this could be a good idea. Almost the only way in which the illegal firearms were recovered in Mexico was when they were left at crime scenes. ATF would check serial numbers, and sometimes was able to verify that a weapon that had been bought by a known straw purchaser had, indeed, wound up in the hands of a Mexican drug gang. But so what? The authorities already knew that was taking place, and identifying the serial number after the fact would do little or nothing to help identify or catch higher-ups in the drug cartel. Intuitively, the traditional approach described above seems like a much more effective way to roll up a drug gang, which was the stated purpose of Fast and Furious.

    Many ATF agents were appalled by, and rebelled against, Fast and Furious. They predicted that guns the agency had purposely allowed to get into the hands of a drug cartel would inevitably be used to commit crimes of violence, potentially against law enforcement officers. But their complaints were suppressed by higher-ups in ATF and DOJ.

    The weapons that were permitted to be smuggled into Mexico under Fast and Furious contributed to the drug violence there. According to ATF agents who testified, that made ATF officials "giddy." One agent recounted a conversation with an ATF higher-up in which he asked, "are you prepared to go to a border agent's funeral over this or a Cochise County deputy's over this, because that's going to happen." Her response, in a chilling echo of Lenin, was that "if you are going to make an omelette, you need to scramble some eggs."

    The inevitable occurred on December 14, 2010, when Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry was murdered by a group of illegal aliens near Rio Rico, Arizona. Two AK-47-type weapons found at the scene had serial numbers that showed they were bought by a straw purchaser named Jaime Avila, whose identity as such had been known to ATF since November 2009.

    The evidence suggests that the Department of Justice immediately went into cover-up mode. In January 2011, William Newell, Special Agent in Charge of the ATF's Phoenix Field Division, held a press conference in which he announced the indictment of 20 individuals. This was presented as though it represented the roll-up of a drug gang, but in fact, most of the indictments were for the relatively minor offense of "lying and buying," and nearly all of those indicted were straw purchasers whose identities were known to ATF long before Fast and Furious began.

    Since then, DOJ has attempted to deflect inquiry by quibbling over whether Fast and Furious involved "gun walking" or not--it did, under any but the narrowest definition, but the terminology is immaterial--and by stonewalling the House committee's requests for documents relating to the program.

    The joint staff report whose findings are summarized in this post does not accuse the Department of Justice of bad faith. It assumes that Fast and Furious was a misguided attempt at a new anti-cartel strategy, which had the unintended but foreseeable effect of contributing to the spiraling violence along the Mexican border.

    Others are not so sure. At Pajamas Media, Bob Owens speculates that the Obama administration used Fast and Furious to advance a gun control agenda:

    The most damning revelations coming out of the hearings on Operation Fast and Furious held by the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform are the unmistakable indications that the program was never designed to succeed as a law enforcement operation at all. ...

    ATF agents testifying in front of the House Oversight Committee could not explain how the operation was supposed to succeed when their surveillance efforts stopped at the border and interdiction was never an option.

    ATF Agent John Dodson, testifying in front of the committee, said that in his entire law enforcement career, he had "never been involved in or even heard of an operation in which law enforcement officers let guns walk." He continued: "I cannot begin to think of how the risk of letting guns fall into the hands of known criminals could possibly advance any legitimate law enforcement interest."

    The obvious answer is that Gunwalker's objective was never intended to be a "legitimate law enforcement interest." Instead, it appears that ATF Acting Director Ken Melson and Department of Justice senior executives specifically created an operation that was designed from the outset to arm Mexican narco-terrorists and increase violence substantially along both sides of the Southwest border. ...

    At the same time in 2009 that federal law enforcement agencies (the ATF, the DOJ, and presumably Janet Napolitano's Department of Homeland Security) were creating the operation that led to the executive branch being the largest gun smuggler in the Southwest [Ed.: This characterization is overblown; the Obama administration did not smuggle guns, but did intentionally permit and encourage the smuggling of weapons that easily could have been confiscated.], the president's team was crafting the rhetoric to sell the crisis they were creating.

    On television, in various news outlets, and even in a joint appearance with Mexican President Felipe Calderon, Obama pushed the 90 percent lie, implying that 90% of the guns recovered in Mexican cartel violence came from U.S. gun shops.

    At the same time they were damning gun dealers in public, the administration was secretly forcing them to provide weapons to the cartels, by the armful and without oversight.
    More than one gun industry insider suggests that the administration extorted cooperation and silence from these gun shops.
    This is an explosive accusation, for which there is no evidence beyond the circumstantial. But Eric Holder's Department of Justice needs to stop stonewalling Issa's committee and start providing clear--among other things, unredacted--answers as to who devised Fast and Furious, and why. In the absence of such cooperation, speculation will inevitably run rampant.
    Looks as if the administration was up to some pretty sh*tty shenanigans.

    "The most dangerous myth is the demagoguery that business can be made to pay a larger share, thus relieving the individual. Politicians preaching this are either deliberately dishonest, or economically illiterate, and either one should scare us...
    Only people pay taxes, and people pay as consumers every tax that is assessed against a business."


    -The Gipper


  2. #2
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    Re: Operation Fast and Furious scandal

    The most damning revelations coming out of the hearings on Operation Fast and Furious held by the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform are the unmistakable indications that the program was never designed to succeed as a law enforcement operation at all. ...

    This guy nailed it...


    gjtitus (signed in using Yahoo)

    I am convinced that this operation had a larger agenda, mainly that of more gun control. And I'm also convinced that it was approved at the highest levels, i.e., 0bama and Holder. Remember when the story of guns from the U.S. ending up in Mexico broke several months back?

    Furthermore, 0bama recently assured Sarah Brady group that his Administration is working on gun control "under the radar." So if you think this was really about tracking guns, think again. There was absolutely no good reason for the ATF to do this.

  3. #3
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    Re: Operation Fast and Furious scandal

    Be interesting to see if the administration has anything to say about this at all. The MSM will be dutifully mum I'm sure...

    ATF Whistleblower Who Testified to Congress on Gunwalker Program Is Fired

    It’s an Obama world…
    In December Vince Cefalu of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms publicized the agency’s role in allowing thousands of guns to cross the U.S. border and fall into the hands of Mexican drug gangs.



    Now agent Cefalu is without a job. The ATF terminated him this week.
    FOX News reported:

    The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms is being accused of retaliating against an agent who helped publicize the agency’s role in allowing thousands of guns to cross the U.S. border and fall into the hands of Mexican drug gangs.

    The agent, Vince Cefalu, who has spoken out about the ATF’s so-called “Project Gunrunner” scandal, says he was served with termination papers just last week, and he calls the move politically motivated.

    “Aside from Jay Dobyns, I don’t know of anyone that’s been more vocal about ATF mismanagement than me,” said Cefalu, a senior special agent based in Dublin, Calif. “That’s why this is happening.” Dobyns, an ATF special agent based in Tucson, has appeared several times on Fox News to discuss the scandal.

    Cefalu first told FoxNews.com about the ATF’s embattled anti-gun smuggling operation in December, before the first reports on the story appeared in February. “Simply put, we knowingly let hundreds of guns and dozens of identified bad guys go across the border,” Cefalu said at the time.

    Since then, Cefalu’s claims have been vindicated, as a number of agents with first-hand knowledge of the case came forward. The scandal over Project Gunrunner led to congressional hearings, a presidential reprimand – Obama called the operation “a serious mistake” – and speculation that ATF chief Ken Melson will resign.

    Yet last week, Cefalu, who has worked for the agency for 24 years, was forced to turn in his gun and badge. He can appeal but will be on “paid administrative leave” during the process.
    "The most dangerous myth is the demagoguery that business can be made to pay a larger share, thus relieving the individual. Politicians preaching this are either deliberately dishonest, or economically illiterate, and either one should scare us...
    Only people pay taxes, and people pay as consumers every tax that is assessed against a business."


    -The Gipper


  4. #4
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    Re: Operation Fast and Furious scandal

    Quote Originally Posted by AMDScooter View Post
    Be interesting to see if the administration has anything to say about this at all. The MSM will be dutifully mum I'm sure...

    ATF Whistleblower Who Testified to Congress on Gunwalker Program Is Fired





    They interviewed agent Vince Cefalu this morning on Fox but you’re right BHO media will try sweeping this deadly f*ck up under the rug.

    This regime and MSM are riddled with agenda driven incompetents and idiots.

  5. #5
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    Re: Operation Fast and Furious scandal

    ^^^

    This testimony could give this real legs. My prediction... the P-Turtle bus is gonna go "bumpity bump" over at least 2 high ranking administration officials.

    Melson to testify on Fast & Furious as part of deal in Senate

    The embargo on documents and testimony from the ATF on Project Gunwalker/Operation Fast and Furious appears to have ended. According to the Daily Beast last night, a deal brokered between Senators Pat Leahy and Charles Grassley will bring ATF chief Kenneth Melson, other witnesses, and a large set of documents to Congress as it probes the ATF and the Department of Justice’s gunrunning sting operation gone horribly awry (via Public Secrets):

    The testimony—expected next month from Kenneth Melson, the acting director of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives—was brokered as part of a deal between Senate Judiciary Committee chairman Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) and the committee’s top Republican, Iowa’s Charles Grassley. Grassley and his fellow Republicans were given full access to ATF documents, Melson, and other key witnesses; and in return, Grassley agreed to release three Obama administration nominees he had been blocking, according to correspondence obtained by NEWSWEEK and THE DAILY BEAST.

    Grassley had been fighting to get full access for months. He finally got it with a letter Leahy wrote to Attorney General Eric Holder requesting access for both his staff and Grassley’s investigators to the evidence and witnesses in the gun-sting investigation. In return, Grassley agreed to let proceed the nominations of Jim Cole to be deputy attorney general, Lisa Monaco to be assistant attorney general for national security, and Virginia Seitz to be head of the Office of Legal Counsel, the letter shows.
    That doesn’t sound like good news for the Obama administration. Melson had been considered a likely fall guy, but according to John Solomon’s report, Melson has no intention of falling on his sword — at least not by himself:

    Congressional investigators in both chambers want to know whether Melson discussed or sought approval for the strategy from Holder or his top deputies, the White House, or other senior law-enforcement officers. They also want to know whether Melson’s agency has run into roadblocks or poor information sharing in its efforts to combat larger gun trafficking.

    As head of the agency that conducted the controversial sting, Melson has faced calls for his resignation. But in private conversations with congressional investigators in recent days, Melson has indicated he does not believe he did anything wrong because he carried out his bosses’ wishes and is eager to testify to describe the full picture, according to sources familiar with those conversations.
    Bob Owens handicaps the potential outcomes for Pajamas Media. He considers the option for Melson to take the fall himself to still be possible, but notes that Melson could easily have already done this. Why wait? The next step up from Melson is the DoJ’s Criminal Division head Lanny Breuer. Breuer personally authorized a wiretap for Gunwalker, so he is already involved. Breuer, though, is an old political hand that would resign in a heartbeat to shield others from responsibility. It’s when it gets above Breuer that the stakes get interesting:

    3. Breuer isn’t the highest link in the chain: Melson implicates Attorney General Eric Holder.

    Chairman Issa states that AG Holder “absolutely” knew about Gunwalker earlier than he testified that he did, and if Issa has the evidence to prove that the attorney general is part of a cover-up, then there is every reason to suspect Holder will be forced to resign, or will face impeachment.

    This is a far more likely scenario than many think.

    4. Collateral damage.

    There is the distinct possibility that Lanny Breuer and Eric Holder are not the only administration officials that run the risk of going down as a result of their roles in Gunwalker and its cover-up. While ATF and their parent organization the Department of Justice were ultimately responsible for the operation, other executive branch departments were involved.

    The Department of Homeland Security played a role in Gunwalker, and DHS Secretary Janet Napolitano would possibly be kept abreast of Gunwalker since she was both the former governor of Arizona and the state’s attorney general from 1999-2002. Lesser-ranking figures within DHS and other agencies were certainly involved, but Napolitano is the cabinet-level official other than Eric Holder who would have most likely known about Gunwalker.
    I doubt that Melson would have had direct contact with Napolitano on this kind of clandestine effort, though. That seems to be much less likely than Melson having something on Holder. If (a very big “if”) Melson can show that Holder lied to Congress about what he knew and when he knew it — the old Watergate question — then Holder will have no choice but to resign or face impeachment. In fact, it hardly seems worth the effort for Melson to hold out on a resignation just to get Breuer.

    This should be a very interesting set of hearings and documents. Perhaps at the least, they can shed light on why the whistleblower in this case got fired shortly after exposing the botched operation.
    "The most dangerous myth is the demagoguery that business can be made to pay a larger share, thus relieving the individual. Politicians preaching this are either deliberately dishonest, or economically illiterate, and either one should scare us...
    Only people pay taxes, and people pay as consumers every tax that is assessed against a business."


    -The Gipper


  6. #6
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    Re: Operation Fast and Furious scandal

    Left hand.. "ignore what the right hand is actually doing".

    DoJ: Fast & Furious Was Definitely Not About Creating A Pretext For Increasing Gun Control
    Elijah Cummings: Hey, Let's Expand Fast & Furious To Consider Increasing Gun Control


    Actually, tell a lie, I don't know if DoJ has expressly denied this theory. I'm not sure anyone has actually asked.

    But either way, a program that deliberately put thousands of illegal arms into the hands of Mexican bandits and did not track those weapons, except via autopsy reports, is somehow morphing into a pretext for increasing gun control.

    Hey, I've got a radical new gun control law: The ATF shall not deliberately put thousands of illegal arms into the hands of Mexican bandits and then not track them whatsoever except via autopsy reports.

    Anyone up for that law?

    Nah. Let's restrict guns generally. Actually cracking down on the specific parties responsible for the sale of these guns -- that would be the ATF -- is too direct a solution.

    Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-Md.), the leading Democrat on the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, released a report early Thursday titled “Outgunned,” that details how Bureau for Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives agents say gun laws need to be tightened for them to fight organized crime along the U.S.-Mexico border.
    "The most dangerous myth is the demagoguery that business can be made to pay a larger share, thus relieving the individual. Politicians preaching this are either deliberately dishonest, or economically illiterate, and either one should scare us...
    Only people pay taxes, and people pay as consumers every tax that is assessed against a business."


    -The Gipper


  7. #7
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    Re: Operation Fast and Furious scandal

    Well ya...how else are we supposed to fight a "war" on drugs if the other side isnt armed??


    We do this with almost everyone we attack.

  8. #8
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    Re: Operation Fast and Furious scandal

    So you think we're prepping to invade Mexico?

    ATF gunrunning weapons turning up in Phoenix crime investigations

    If Americans think that the ATF’s gunrunning fiasco will only impact Mexico, think again. The same porous border that allowed the ATF and the Department of Justice to send a flood of illegal weapons south has already allowed for them to flow north as well. The ABC affiliate in Phoenix uncovers evidence that weapons from Operation Fast and Furious have been found in crime scenes in the Valley of the Sun, a situation that one ATF agent says will continue “for years to come”:
    For months the ABC15 Investigators have been searching through police reports and official government documents. We’ve discovered assault weapons linked to the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives’ controversial “Fast and Furious” case strategy have turned up at crime scenes in Glendale and Phoenix communities. …

    The ABC15 Investigators uncovered documents showing guns connected to at least two Glendale criminal cases and at least two Phoenix criminal cases also appear in the ATF’s Suspect Gun Database, a sort-of watch list for suspicious gun sales.

    All four cases involve drug-related offenses. In one Glendale police report dated July 2010, police investigators working with DEA agents served search warrants at homes near 75th and Glendale avenues in Glendale, and 43rd and Glendale avenues in Phoenix as part of a “large scale marijuana trafficking” investigation.

    Police investigators reported they “obtained information that members of the (trafficking) organization were using the homes…as stash houses used to store large amounts of marijuana temporarily.”

    They reported finding hundreds of pounds of marijuana, more than $63,000 in U.S. currency and three guns inside the homes. One of the recovered weapons, a Romarm/Cugir WASR-10 rifle, appeared in an official ATF Suspect Gun Summary document in November 2009, proving agents knowingly allowed the suspicious gun sale, months before the weapon turned up at the crime scene.

    In a separate Glendale Police Department case, dated November 2010, detectives discovered “bulk marijuana and weapons” inside a residence near 75th Avenue and Bethany Home Road in Glendale. Investigators recovered nearly 400 pounds of drugs and several firearms from the home.

    One of the recovered weapons, another Romarm/Cugir WASR-10 rifle, appeared in an official ATF Suspect Gun Summary document in February 2010.
    It could have been worse. Another case involved a traffic stop, where an ATF-linked AK-47 was seized. The officer who made the arrest should count himself lucky that the weapon was still in the trunk and not in the suspect’s hands.

    Senator Charles Grassley (R-IA) promises to investigate these cases toward the end of the video, and also warns that Phoenix hasn’t been the only area that has seen ATF weapons fueling crime. Congress should get to the bottom of that immediately. How many more cities will be paying the price for this tragically botched operation?
    "The most dangerous myth is the demagoguery that business can be made to pay a larger share, thus relieving the individual. Politicians preaching this are either deliberately dishonest, or economically illiterate, and either one should scare us...
    Only people pay taxes, and people pay as consumers every tax that is assessed against a business."


    -The Gipper


  9. #9
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    Re: Operation Fast and Furious scandal

    Well.. looks like the administration is indeed playing fast and loose with the facts.

    Uh-Oh: ATF Head Melson Secretly Testifies, Without Notice to ATF or Department of Justice

    Hello!

    This morning, House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Darrell Issa and Senate Judiciary Committee Ranking Member Charles Grassley released a copy of a letter they sent to Attorney General Eric Holder on July 5 about Melson’s testimony. Melson’s revelations raise even more serious issues not only about the operation itself, but about apparent attempts by the Justice Department to mislead Congress on the details of the operation.

    Contrary to the Justice Department’s denials, according to Melson, ATF agents specifically witnessed transfers of weapons from straw purchasers to third parties without taking any further action.
    Melson claimed that it was not until the public disclosure of the operation that he personally reviewed the “hundreds of documents” related to the case. He said he became “sick to his stomach” when he learned the full story.
    Very interesting is the letter to Holder written by Grassley and Issa, accusing the DoJ of obstruction.

    If you recall, we (or at least some of us) had questions about how the DoJ could block someone from testifying. Based on this letter, here's the answer: The DoJ will provide you with a lawyer to advise you, but will only do so when the DoJ agrees you should testify.

    They'll pick up the legal expenses of testifying, then, but only if you're a very good boy.

    However, nothing prevents you from voluntarily appearing, on your own recognizance, and hiring your own lawyer to advise you, if you so choose.

    Apparently the DoJ told Melson about the first thing but forgot to advise him of the second. But he was made aware (probably by Issa or someone like that) that he could do so, and so did.

    The letter goes on to accuse Holder of deliberate obstruction of a lawful investigation:

    According to Mr. Melson, he and ATF's senior leadership team moved to reassign every manager involved in Fast and Furious, from the Deputy Assistant Director for Field Operations down to the Group Supervisor, after learning the facts in those documents. Mr. Melson also said he was not allowed to communicate to Congress the reasons for the reassignments. He claimed that ATF's senior leadership would have preferred to be more cooperative with our inquiry much earlier in the process. However, he said that Justice Department officials directed them not to respond and took full control of replying to briefing and document requests from Congress. The result is that Congress only got the parts of the story that the Department wanted us to hear. If his account is accurate, then ATF leadership appears to have be en effectively muzzled while the DOJ s ent over false denials and bur i ed its he ad in the sand. That approach distorted the truth and obstructed our investigation.
    You guys know no one in the media is reporting on this, right?

    As I said with Anthony Weiner: Damn, the media's going to be all over this here story and leave us in the conservative alternate media with no scoops whatsoever. They'll just pick this carcass of every bit of meat and leave us nothing but bones.

    Not Testifying "Before Congress"? Drew's not sure about the way I described this:

    Not to be pedantic but I don't think saying he "testified before congress" is really accurate. That implies a hearing with members present. This was with investigators. Strikes me as more akin to a deposition or meeting with cops than testifying in court.
    Okay, well at the least he testified before Congressional investigators.
    "The most dangerous myth is the demagoguery that business can be made to pay a larger share, thus relieving the individual. Politicians preaching this are either deliberately dishonest, or economically illiterate, and either one should scare us...
    Only people pay taxes, and people pay as consumers every tax that is assessed against a business."


    -The Gipper


  10. #10
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    Re: Operation Fast and Furious scandal

    This should certainly be a bigger story than giving arms to the Contras back in the 80s. What happened to investigative reporting? Apparently, it only exists for Republicans.
    Brian

  11. #11
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    Re: Operation Fast and Furious scandal

    43 Weapons in Phoenix Traffic Stop Linked to ATF's 'Fast and Furious'



    "The most dangerous myth is the demagoguery that business can be made to pay a larger share, thus relieving the individual. Politicians preaching this are either deliberately dishonest, or economically illiterate, and either one should scare us...
    Only people pay taxes, and people pay as consumers every tax that is assessed against a business."


    -The Gipper


  12. #12
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    Re: Operation Fast and Furious scandal


  13. #13
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    Re: Operation Fast and Furious scandal

    Quote Originally Posted by bk94si View Post
    This should certainly be a bigger story than giving arms to the Contras back in the 80s. What happened to investigative reporting? Apparently, it only exists for Republicans.
    No joke there. I'm thinking this will break big sooner than later. Eventually the press will be unable to ignore it... like the Edwards story.

    Which Was Worse: Watergate or Operation ‘Fast and Furious’?

    After The Washington Post broke the news of the Watergate break-ins in 1972, the Nixon administration circled the wagons. And in 1997 – a full 25 years after the fact – Katherine Graham, who was with The Post in 1972, vividly recalled how “Nixon began making threats of economic retaliation against the paper.”

    According to Graham, Nixon bullied the paper, sought to silence it, and launched a “campaign to undermine public confidence in [it].”
    Judging from what Graham said, it appears that Nixon wanted to be sure people understood that if they continued to pry into Watergate or talk about Watergate or break news about Watergate as it unfolded, there would be harsh ramifications. (Keep in mind – Nixon had nothing to do with planning Watergate. Only with covering it up once he learned of it after the fact.)
    Honestly folks, Watergate provided the Left with such a singularly sweet opportunity to bring down a Republican president that they’ve never gotten over it. As recently as 2004, MSNBC sent reporters to the streets to be sure up and coming generations had not forgotten what Nixon had done. (I don’t want to belabor the point, but Nixon had nothing to do with planning Watergate. Only with covering it up once he learned of it after the fact.)
    So for covering up something up, Nixon was crucified by Left: to the point that by the summer of 1974 it became evident the House of Representatives was going to bring up impeachment charges against him. But he nipped those plans in the bud by resigning office on August 9, 1974, and flipping the “V” for victory to the hippies and the war protestors as he boarded the chopper that carried him away from the White House.

    No one died during the Watergate break-ins or as a result of Nixon’s cover-up.
    Switch gears and jump to 2009, and the ATF’s special operation “Fast and Furious.”
    An operation with which you’re all familiar by now, where upwards of 2500 guns in Arizona were sold to “straw purchasers” under the assumption that those guns were going to end up in the hands of Mexican cartel members who could then be arrested.

    Talk about an embarrassingly ignorant plan.

    Jump now to 2011 – of the approximately 2500 guns sold only a few hundred have been recovered and at least one federal agent, Brian Terry, lost his life due to this ludicrous operation.

    Talk about a cover-up: this operation was somehow planned and conducted without the full knowledge of the Acting ATF Director, the Justice Department, or President Obama having any knowledge of it. (By “full knowledge” I mean that Acting ATF Director Kenneth Melson says knew about it, but was kept “in the dark” regarding the extent of the operation, and the involvement of other agencies like the FBI and DEA.)

    In other news, on July 5th Jack Tapper (ABC News) peppered Obama’s White House Press Secretary with questions about “Fast and Furious” in front of the rest of the press reporters, but the most substantive answer that Jay Carney gave was: “The president takes this very seriously.” (In all fairness to Carney, he’s clueless because Obama keeps him clueless.)

    Look folks, this is ridiculous. Where is Chris Matthews? Where is that Keith guy who used to work for MSNBC? Where are all the freaks who wanted to hang George W. Bush in effigy for supposedly-lying about Iraq?

    Why are they silent in the face of so great a cover-up?

    Senator Charles Grassley and Representative Darrell Issa are pressing for answers on “Fast and Furious,” yet the Justice Department is doing its best to keep people from talking. (Grassley and Issa actually had to send a letter to the Justice Department to ask them to avoid pressuring people into not talking and to provide protections for those who do.)

    Remember: No one died during Watergate, yet Nixon had to resign. Federal Agent Brian Terry is gone due to “Fast and Furious” – it’s time for someone to lose their job, if not go to jail or face impeachment charges in the House of Representatives.
    "The most dangerous myth is the demagoguery that business can be made to pay a larger share, thus relieving the individual. Politicians preaching this are either deliberately dishonest, or economically illiterate, and either one should scare us...
    Only people pay taxes, and people pay as consumers every tax that is assessed against a business."


    -The Gipper


  14. #14
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    Re: Operation Fast and Furious scandal

    Wow.. apparently paid for with "stimulus" cash to boot...

    Fast And Furious, Aka Gunwalker, Funded By Stimulus Bill

    Hidden in plain sight, in a bill that no one read, was $10,000,000 for an ATF project called “Gunrunner.” Domandred at Free Republic found this:

    I scanned the text of H.R.1 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 for gun, firearm, etc and came up with a hit.

    I posted in the thread: “Only time “gun” or “firearm” appears is in the part that give $10,000,000 to the ATF for Project Gunrunner. That was H.R. 495, asking for 15,000,000 for Gunrunner”.

    H.R. 495 that I mentioned never made it out of committee, but it looks as it was to specifically fund Gunrunner.

    Instead portions of it were rolled into the stimulus package a month later. That text found in H.R.1 is:

    For an additional amount for ‘State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance’, $40,000,000, for competitive grants to provide assistance and equipment to local law enforcement along the Southern border and in High-Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas to combat criminal narcotics activity stemming from the Southern border, of which $10,000,000 shall be transferred to ‘Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, Salaries and Expenses’ for the ATF Project Gunrunner.

    Notice that’s $40,000,000 for Southern border enforcement, $10,000,000 of which specifically for Project Gunrunner. What does $10 million pay for here?
    Attorney General Eric Holder said he wouldn’t authorize it, but someone in Congress knew enough about it to earmark ten million bones for it. And Obama signed the bill and gave it to them.

    Does that mean everyone who voted for or signed the Stimulus Bill should be indicted as accessories to all these crimes, including the deaths of Border Patrol agent Brian Terry and ICE agent Jaime Zapata?

    And I ask again, what was the ultimate goal of this operation that allowed thousands of guns to “walk” across the border into the hands of extremely violent drug cartels?
    "The most dangerous myth is the demagoguery that business can be made to pay a larger share, thus relieving the individual. Politicians preaching this are either deliberately dishonest, or economically illiterate, and either one should scare us...
    Only people pay taxes, and people pay as consumers every tax that is assessed against a business."


    -The Gipper


  15. #15
    Joined
    Feb 2003
    Location
    SC
    Age
    66
    Posts
    314

    Re: Operation Fast and Furious scandal

    the goal was for obama to end the economic down turn by selling millions of guns to the drug cartels. fast and easy cash. for him to spend on his union buddies.
    Dr. Seuss for 2011:I do not like this Uncle Sam, I do not like his health care scam. I do not like these dirty crooks, or how they lie and cook the books. I do not like when Congress steals, I do not like their secret deals. I do not like ex-speaker Nan, I do not like this 'YES WE CAN'..I do not like this spending spree, I'm smart, I know that nothing's free. I do not like their smug replies, when I complain about their lies. I do not like this kind of hope. I do not like it. Nope, nope, nope!

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