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Thread: Steam Linux

  1. #1
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    Steam Linux

    They just expanded the beta test group and I got an invite. You still looking for people with one Ryan?

    PS: After almost 2 years my university has finally decided your website is not a malware link. :P

  2. #2
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    Re: Steam Linux

    I finally got around to trying it once it was officially released. I'll probably be more interested in it once more games get ported over to Linux. I did pick up Crusader kings 2 though. I'm largely a console gamer but do miss the in depth strategy and simulation games that you can't do (or do well) on a console.
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  3. #3
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    Re: Steam Linux

    I wouldn't game on Linux.
    Im such a n00b with Linux, I just use it for browsing "unknown territorys" for security reasons.

  4. #4
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    Re: Steam Linux

    well if MS keeps putting out OS like windows 8 watch me Run to Linux and steam !

    Linux Mint is looking pretty sweet . My major draw back is I can not get it to work with my sound card a HT omega Eclario . Yet to see a distro work out of the box with that card
    Last edited by brothergc; 07-31-2013 at 07:42 PM.
    "The Lord Is My Shepherd, I Shall Not Want"
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  5. #5
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    Re: Steam Linux

    Quote Originally Posted by brothergc View Post
    well if MS keeps putting out OS like windows 8 watch me Run to Linux and steam !

    Linux Mint is looking pretty sweet . My major draw back is I can not get it to work with my sound card a HT omega Eclario . Yet to see a distro work out of the box with that card
    Most of the time, sound & video cards wont be supported (OOB) without getting down n dirty with the command line.


  6. #6
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    Re: Steam Linux

    Quote Originally Posted by mmettin View Post
    Most of the time, sound & video cards wont be supported (OOB) without getting down n dirty with the command line.
    yea that is where I am not good at . Might just be better to consider on board sound
    "The Lord Is My Shepherd, I Shall Not Want"
    PS:23

  7. #7
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    Re: Steam Linux

    Obviously doesn't help with hardware you already have, but as long as you do a little research when buying hardware you can always find good quality hardware that has excellent driver support.

    I hope more big games come to Linux on steam. I'm loving Crusader Kings 2, more games like that are what I'm talking about. Most of the linux games right now seem to be Indie games which are fine, but not really my thing.
    Motherboard: Asus M3A78
    CPU: AMD Athlon 64 X2 5400 Brisbane
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    HDD1: Mushkin Enhanced Chronos 60GB SSD
    HDD2: Western Digital 500GB
    VDD: ECS GeForce GT 520
    PSU: PC Power and Cooling 500 Watt
    OS: openSUSE

  8. #8
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    Re: Steam Linux

    Quote Originally Posted by Captain_Stormy View Post
    Obviously doesn't help with hardware you already have, but as long as you do a little research when buying hardware you can always find good quality hardware that has excellent driver support.

    I hope more big games come to Linux on steam. I'm loving Crusader Kings 2, more games like that are what I'm talking about. Most of the linux games right now seem to be Indie games which are fine, but not really my thing.
    me too . already changing hardware out with a amd system with a nice on board sound soulution I can find ( realteck ) I have to do some research on a linux frendy printer . my cannon IP1800 will not work , gotta have a printer
    "The Lord Is My Shepherd, I Shall Not Want"
    PS:23

  9. #9
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    Re: Steam Linux

    HP's printers run great on Linux. Actually probably better than they do on Windows. HP officially supports Linux with a program called HPLIP (HP Linux Image Printing I think it stands for).

    I think most if not all of their printers are supported with it. I've only ever used the MFC all in one models but I've never looked at one that wasn't supported.

    Aside from that, I know alot of other's work but I don't think most vendors officially support Linux the way HP does.
    Motherboard: Asus M3A78
    CPU: AMD Athlon 64 X2 5400 Brisbane
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    HDD1: Mushkin Enhanced Chronos 60GB SSD
    HDD2: Western Digital 500GB
    VDD: ECS GeForce GT 520
    PSU: PC Power and Cooling 500 Watt
    OS: openSUSE

  10. #10
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    Re: Steam Linux

    Quote Originally Posted by Captain_Stormy View Post
    HP's printers run great on Linux. Actually probably better than they do on Windows. HP officially supports Linux with a program called HPLIP (HP Linux Image Printing I think it stands for).

    I think most if not all of their printers are supported with it. I've only ever used the MFC all in one models but I've never looked at one that wasn't supported.

    Aside from that, I know alot of other's work but I don't think most vendors officially support Linux the way HP does.
    Just my $.02. I recently installed Linux Mint and my networked HP Scan/Fax/Printer was detected by it with no problems when I scanned the network for printers. It prints as good as anything I did in Windows. I can directly to the memory card on the printer and then just copy the files off over the network, so no problems there. I'm never tried faxing on Linux.

  11. #11
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    Re: Steam Linux

    I've been sending alot of faxes lately since I just got married and have to fax the proof for my wife changing her name in a bunch of places. I just use the built in functionality of the printer though and not any software on my computer.
    Motherboard: Asus M3A78
    CPU: AMD Athlon 64 X2 5400 Brisbane
    RAM: 8GB Mushkin DDR2 800
    HDD1: Mushkin Enhanced Chronos 60GB SSD
    HDD2: Western Digital 500GB
    VDD: ECS GeForce GT 520
    PSU: PC Power and Cooling 500 Watt
    OS: openSUSE

  12. #12
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    Re: Steam Linux

    Quote Originally Posted by Captain_Stormy View Post
    HP's printers run great on Linux. Actually probably better than they do on Windows. HP officially supports Linux with a program called HPLIP (HP Linux Image Printing I think it stands for).

    I think most if not all of their printers are supported with it. I've only ever used the MFC all in one models but I've never looked at one that wasn't supported.

    Aside from that, I know alot of other's work but I don't think most vendors officially support Linux the way HP does.
    Actually I have found that I prefer Brother Laser printers. I have had NO issues with Brother and Linux drivers. They provide LPR and CUPS drivers as well as a program to auto-install and configure both drivers.

    As far as that Sound card the OP has, I am looking into accessing the drivers for it or rolling fresh ones for the OP.

    Just got an email back from HT OMEGA.

    they referred me back to the ALSA pages. So,
    Here is the link as well as the instructions for setting up the HT OMEGA eClaro in Linux.

    http://www.alsa-project.org/main/ind...:Module-oxygen

    Introduction for Oxygen HD Audio (CMI8788) soundcard

    There are two ways of getting Linux drivers to work, you can either compile them into the kernel or build them separately as modules. Read the Kernel-HOWTO for details of how to compile a kernel.
    You must turn on the sound support soundcore module. This is in the kernel. Look in the sound drivers directory and it should be the first option. Most people enable the module setting. That way you can load and unload the module manually if you have multiple soundcards/​devices or if you intend to debug or use cutting edge software which may cause your drivers to halt sometimes. Of course it also means you have more control of your system.
    Most modern distros come with soundcore compiled as a module. You can check this in numerous ways. The easiest way is to type:
    modinfo soundcore
    If this command returns that you have this module, then you don't need to recompile your kernel.
    Quick installation

    This explains how to build from source tarballs. See GIT_Server for instructions on getting and using the latest source from git repositories.
    Type the following commands in the shell of your choice.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Make a directory to store the alsa source code in:
    cd /usr/src
    mkdir alsa
    cd alsa
    cp /downloads/alsa-* .
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Now unzip and install the alsa-driver package:
    bunzip2 alsa-driver-xxx
    tar -xf alsa-driver-xxx
    cd alsa-driver-xxx
    ./configure --with-cards=oxygen --with-sequencer=yes ; make ; make install
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Now unzip and install the alsa-lib package:
    cd ..
    bunzip2 alsa-lib-xxx
    tar -xf alsa-lib-xxx
    cd alsa-lib-xxx
    ./configure ; make ; make install
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Now unzip and install the alsa-firmware package:
    cd ..
    bunzip2 alsa-firmware-xxx
    tar -xf alsa-firmware-xxx
    cd alsa-firmware-xxx
    ./configure ; make ; make install
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Now unzip and install the alsa-utils package:
    cd ..
    bunzip2 alsa-utils-xxx
    tar -xf alsa-utils-xxx
    cd alsa-utils-xxx
    ./configure ; make ; make install
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Now insert the modules into the kernel:
    modprobe snd-oxygen ; modprobe snd-pcm-oss ; modprobe snd-mixer-oss ; modprobe snd-seq-oss
    Now adjust your soundcard's volume levels. All mixer channels are muted by default. You must use a native mixer program to unmute appropriate channels, for example alsamixer from the alsa-utils package. Note that some usb-audio devices do not have internal mixer controls. Run:
    alsamixer
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    You can also look at the utils/​alsasound file. This script is designed for the RedHat Linux distribution, but it can also be used with other distributions which use System V style rc init scripts. This will allow you to load your modules at boot time. If you don't want to do this you can of course compile them into the kernel instead and save yourself the hassle of coming to terms with the rc init scripts.
    Setting up modprobe and kmod support

    Before you send a mail complaining that "I don't have /etc/​modules.conf, where do I find it " ‒ the /etc/​conf.modules has been deprecated with a few distro's, but in your case it may still be /etc/​conf.modules. Basically they are both the same, but recent version of modutils use /etc/​modules.conf instead. Nothing to worry about as such, optionally please update to the latest version of modutils. This should solve your problem.

    Here's the example for this card. Copy and paste this to the bottom of your /etc/​modules.conf file.
    Note:
    Debian GNU/Linux users need to save this information into a file in the /etc/​modutils/ directory (eg. /etc/​modutils/​alsa) and run update-modules.
    Note also that the kernel module soundcore has been renamed in Debian kernels >2.6.23 into snd. A workaround is to put a symlink at /lib/modules/x.x.xx/kernel/sound/soundcore.ko pointing to snd.ko
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    # ALSA portion
    alias char-major-116 snd
    alias snd-card-0 snd-oxygen
    # module options should go here

    # OSS/Free portion
    alias char-major-14 soundcore
    alias sound-slot-0 snd-card-0

    # card #1
    alias sound-service-0-0 snd-mixer-oss
    alias sound-service-0-1 snd-seq-oss
    alias sound-service-0-3 snd-pcm-oss
    alias sound-service-0-8 snd-seq-oss
    alias sound-service-0-12 snd-pcm-oss
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Last edited by KRDucky; 03-09-2014 at 05:34 AM.

  13. #13
    Joined
    Feb 2014
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    79

    Re: Steam Linux

    Part 2 of previous post:
    To copy and paste the above to your /etc/​modules.conf file follow these instructions.
    modules.conf

    This is a short explanation of what happens in the /etc/​modules.conf file.
    Native devices
    After the main multiplexer is loaded, its code automatically requests the top level sound card module. String snd-card-%i is requested for native devices where %i is the sound card number, counted from zero (the first sound card) to seven (the eighth sound card). String sound-slot-%i is requested for native devices where %i is slot number for the corresponding ALSA owner (which is basically the sound card number). The options line allows you to set various configuration options before the module is loaded. String id (or snd_id) lets you set the name of the card which is then returned in the /proc/​asound/​cards file, i.e. to user space applications. Other options may be available depending on the specific card. Options for these cards are found in the INSTALL file or above.
    username@hostname# pico /etc/modules.conf

    # ALSA portion
    alias snd-card-0 snd-hda-intel
    alias snd-card-1 snd-cmipci
    options snd-cmipci id="first" mpu_port=0x330

    # OSS/Free portion
    alias sound-slot-0 snd-card-0
    alias sound-slot-1 snd-card-1
    NB:
    For drivers older than 0.9.0rc5 use:
    options snd-cmipci snd_id="first" snd_mpu_port=0x330

    NB:
    The "snd_" prefix has been removed from the module options to fit with the kernel standard.

    Autoloading OSS/free emulation
    At this point we are finished with the configuration for ALSA native devices, but you may also need autoloading for the OSS/Free emulation modules, an ALSA add-on. At this time only one module does not depend on any others, thus must be loaded separately: snd-pcm1-oss. String sound-service-%i-%i is required for OSS/Free service where the first %i is the slot number/​sound card number and the second %i is the service number.
    username@hostname# pico /etc/modules.conf

    # OSS/Free portion - card #1
    alias sound-slot-0 snd-card-0
    alias sound-service-0-0 snd-mixer-oss
    alias sound-service-0-1 snd-seq-oss
    alias sound-service-0-3 snd-pcm-oss
    alias sound-service-0-8 snd-seq-oss
    alias sound-service-0-12 snd-pcm-oss

    # OSS/Free portion - card #2 (cmipci)
    alias sound-slot-1 snd-card-1
    alias sound-service-1-0 snd-mixer-oss
    alias sound-service-1-3 snd-pcm-oss
    alias sound-service-1-12 snd-pcm-oss
    The alias for snd-seq-oss is not necessary on the second device, because there is only one /dev/​sequencer regardless how many devices you have.
    The .asoundrc file
    This file allows you to have more advanced control over your card/​device. For most setups the default, system-wide configuration is sufficient. You may change this file only for special setup. The .asoundrc file consists of definitions for the various sound devices available in your system. It also provides access to the pcm plugins in alsa-lib. These allow you to do tricky things like combine your cards into one or access multiple I/O streams on your multi-channel card.
    Below is the most basic definition (only example - not required to define at all).
    Make a file called .asoundrc in your home and/​or root directory:
    vi ~/.asoundrc
    Copy and paste the following into the file, then save it:
    pcm.oxygen {
    type hw
    card 0
    }

    ctl.oxygen {
    type hw
    card 0
    }

  14. #14
    Joined
    Jun 2014
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    5

    Re: Steam Linux

    I tried Steam out on an old Xubuntu copy and it was okay.
    The two problems were - there weren't many games available due to not many being ported and my crappy system couldn't really try out anything resource intensive.

  15. #15
    Joined
    Feb 2014
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    79

    Re: Steam Linux

    you should try the games in the Linux repositories

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