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Thread: Dns server

  1. #1
    Joined
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    Houston
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    70
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    Dns server

    I acquired a Toshiba laptop without a hard drive, so being a masochist I bought one and installed it.
    Wanting to play around, I installed Windows 7, updated with micorsoft, 190+, then installed Linux Mint. Everything worked well for a day, then Mint could not find 50+% of the servers for my favorites. Opened 7 back up and it couldn't find the servers either. Deleted the partitions and Reinstalled 7, no joy. Used Mint to delete the partitions and Reinstalled Mint, no worky. Neither system can find ANY server that mentions Linux, Mint, Ubuntu, DNS, server repairs, and most of my favorites, including forums.pcper.com.

    Used Kubuntu to remove all partitions, installed Kubuntu, it couldn't find the servers right off the bat. As a side note, I didn't like it any more than it apparently liked me. LOL

    Used Windows 7 and totally wiped and formatted the hard drive and reinstalled Windows 7, updated the 190+ updates, everything seems to be working fine.

    I am not a programmer, don't really want to learn how to either, just want to see what is out there and am willing to follow instructions to type in what is needed to make Linux work.

    As I go through installing Mint again, any suggestions on what the heck is happening? I just wanted to play with Linux a little, but this is crazy
    .

    Update:
    Windows 7 working perfectly, installed Mint, no servers. Switched to 7, still working fine (I shouldn't have said perfectly earlier ;-_)
    Hmmmm....
    Last edited by thewanderer; 11-12-2017 at 10:10 PM.

  2. #2
    Joined
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Houston
    Age
    70
    Posts
    1,045

    Re: Dns server

    Never mind, I tried to update Mint, it can’t remember my password. To old and cranky to continue. Wiped it out, threw away the Linux disks.
    Thanks anyway.

  3. #3
    Joined
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    Location
    Kansas
    Age
    32
    Posts
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    Re: Dns server

    Usually I would expect basic networking to just work out of the box for any average user. I'm not familiar with Mint in particular, but as a Debian user I would expect a fresh install of the base operating system to feature an active DHCP client. Your IP address, gateway, and DNS servers should be fetched this way and everything should "just work".

    However, for future readers who are having DNS issues under linux, I will note that three config files are likely to be important.

    /etc/nsswitch.conf: This controls your system's host name resolution chain. The "hosts" line in particular is important. I like to ensure that mdns is either not used or it is behind regular DNS.

    hosts: files myhostname dns mdns4_minimal [NOTFOUND=return]

    What I have shown here is not the default order of options at least on Debian these days.

    The files option indicates your static entries in /etc/hosts. The dns option means regular external DNS where your system queries a server. The myhostname option just means your local machine name at /etc/hostname. The mdns4_minimal option means you enjoy pain and suffering and wish for Kerberos to not work.

    /etc/resolv.conf
    This file defines the name servers (ie DNS servers) that your system will ask when it needs to. It should contain AT LEAST one working name server, and if it doesn't then this would explain why nothing is working.

    #Google DNS
    nameserver 8.8.8.8
    nameserver 8.8.4.4
    #Quad9.net (A privacy-focused public DNS server that filters out known malware domains)
    nameserver 9.9.9.9

    If your system is using network-manager or some other automatic configuration utility, note that any changes you make here could get wiped out when that tool decides it needs to modify the file. I prefer manual networking setup and uninstall network-manager.

    /etc/network/interfaces
    /etc/network/interfaces.d/* (on some more modern systems)
    Network interfaces are set up here. It should have something like this:

    auto lo
    iface lo inet loopback

    auto eth0
    iface eth0 inet dhcp

    The first definition is the loopback adapter and can be ignored. The second definition tells your system to use adapter eth0 and use dhclient automatically in the background to fetch an address. You can change it to a static adapter if you want or need to such as if your DHCP server isn't working (go fix your router), your DHCP client isn't working (but you should figure out why that is), or you have no DHCP server at all.

    That would look something like this:

    auto eth0
    iface eth0 inet static
    address 192.168.1.10
    netmask 255.255.255.0
    gateway 192.168.1.1

    The gateway should be your upstream router's address. Most home networks use a netmask of 255.255.255.0 and you would know if your network is different. Address should be some free address on the same subnet as your gateway.
    Last edited by TBird761; 02-01-2018 at 11:46 AM.
    Sometimes I feel like I'm becoming a dinosaur.

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