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  1. #1
    Joined
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Stratford,Ontario, Canada
    Age
    51
    Posts
    4

    realistic expectations, life span of a cpu.

    Question is how long do you realistically expect to get from your last build before you upgrade your CPU. I am talking the Core build.. not GPU at all. Motherboard, memory and CPU

    I built my current "core" system back in Fall 2014. It has a Intel i7 5960x 8 core 16 thread CPU in it on an x99 Sabertooth motherboard i installed about 2 years ago after my original Asrock board just died.

    Why i am asking is X99 boards are getting harder to find because they are now a 4 year. old platform. Just wondering if 10 years is how long the community tries to get from a build like this or what time frame would you realistically expect this CPU to stay viable for going forward before you felt its better to upgrade. Im talking viability as in capable of handling future processing loads, gpu needs for processing not specific hardware wear and tear. I know we dont have crystal balls to see the future..so its all guess work mostly.

    I am debating buying a new x99 board to store now just in case this one poops the bed after its 5 year warranty is up as i have had happen a few times.

  2. #2
    Joined
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Janesville, Wi
    Posts
    6,449

    Re: realistic expectations, life span of a cpu.

    My primary system is a 3770k and a Z77 mobo.

    Still going strong, but i don't see really any need to upgrade.

    Performance is fine for what I do.

    Some of the new features of the newer products is appealing, but I don't have a need to upgrade as of yet.


  3. #3
    Joined
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    1

    Re: realistic expectations, life span of a cpu.

    I agree with mmettin. Does it do what you want to do, then it's going to last a while. The pace of change in the CPU world has trickled downwards and you have a bad ass CPU when it was new. There isn't going to be much you can buy that is going to see a massive improvement from what you have now (especially without spending insane money!)

  4. #4
    Joined
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    194

    Re: realistic expectations, life span of a cpu.

    There's two questions I see:

    • How long do we expect the CPU system (mobo, CPU) to last, either before it craps out or we feel the need to upgrade?
    • Should I buy a backup mobo just in case my current one bites the dust but I still want to keep using my computer/CPU?


    For the first question, I hate to say it but the answer is "depends" - depends on usage, personal finances, how we treat our equipment, etc. If I had to guess, I would think most people build systems with the expectation of upgrading within 3-5 years. In recent years, it is possible to stretch this window to 6 or 7 years since many of the past generations of CPUs have been quite good. I'm rocking a 4770K which I built 5 years ago. Would I like to upgrade? Yes. Do I need to upgrade? No.

    As for how durable are they, the CPUs seem to run forever provided you don't OC or push them to their limits. Mobos are a crapshoot. Even high quality ones can die during their warranty coverage. I have an i7-870 with the original mobo still running everyday (I use it for light transcoding and as a guest computer). If I had to guess, I would think a decent mobo under normal usage will probably give you 8-10 years.

    To your second question, I would pass on getting a backup mobo and save that towards a new computer when your current one craps out. But that's me. It just seems to be a big gamble to invest in 4 year-old technology "just in case" your current system craps out and you want to keep using it. What if your system lasts another 4 years? At 8 years, you'll probably be ready to move to the next platform, and you spent money on a mobo you no longer need/want.

    Hope this helps.

  5. #5
    Joined
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    8,040

    Re: realistic expectations, life span of a cpu.

    LGA2011 boards have proven to be a good investment at or below MSRP for a while now, due to the cheap availability of high-core-count Xeons as a socket ages, and DDR3 being more affordable during the early days of DDR4. Between falling RAM prices, and a now-competitive AMD pushing mainstream core counts up, I'm much less confident that X99 boards will appreciate beyond MSRP like older LGA2011 platforms did. Flip a coin?
    If at first you don't succeed, redefine success.

  6. #6
    Joined
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    507

    Re: realistic expectations, life span of a cpu.

    My i7 4770 system is now in it's 5th year of service, and still hasn't given up the ghost to the point that I need to upgrade the cpu, and motherboard. I am getting ready to upgrade to 32GB of DDR3 1600 ram, hopefully next year, hopefully at some point replace all my mechanical drives with SSD's, and get a WQHL gaming monitor.

  7. #7
    Joined
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    1

    Re: realistic expectations, life span of a cpu.

    Unless you're really pushing your hardware for business or something -- my builds usually last me at least 6-7 years on average.

  8. #8
    Joined
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Columbus, OH USA
    Posts
    160

    Re: realistic expectations, life span of a cpu.

    I built my current system around the last time I posted on these forums (July 2009). Yikes, has it been that long!? I have a EVGA X58 3x SLI Motherboard with a Intel Core i-7 920 "Bloomfield" (the first generation of Core i-7 processors I believe), 12GB of RAM, EVGA Nvidia GTX-275. Pretty ancient I know. My system pretty much has been running 24x7 since then. I've only added memory and upgraded to Windows 10. Normally I don't take this long to build a new system. From 1996 until 2009 I had been building a new system about every 3 or 4 years. Back then I gamed a lot more and had more money to spend. I mostly just use this computer for web surfing which it is fine for. I actually came back to these forums to get some advice on a new PC build since I have been away for nearly 10 years and have no idea where to start.
    George

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