Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 59
  1. #1
    Joined
    Oct 2001
    Location
    U.S.A.
    Posts
    47

    Post How to change a motherboard without reinstalling Windows and applications.

    Although posts here and elsewhere agree that a fresh operating system install is best when changing motherboards, various posts describe how a motherboard is changed without reinstalling Windows and applications. The objective of this thread is to provide a resource clearly detailing the step-by-step procedure for motherboard replacement when the existing installed OS and applications are to be left intact.

    (This post is on the MSI forum because I'm currently upgrading several systems from the MSI K7Pro to the MSI K7T266 Pro2. I'll avoid OS and app reinstalls if I can.)

    Clips from resources; How to upgrade:

    "After imaging well over a thousand systems, here's what works for me.

    Create directories for installed hardware under C:\Windows and preload with the drivers you'll need, e.g. C:\Windows\Audio, C:\Windows\Display. Be sure to include drivers for the chipset and the latest BIOS revision for the new mobo.

    Delete all entries in the directory C:\Windows\inf\other

    Copy all OS cabs from the distribution CD to a directory under C:\Windows (OEMs like to use C:\Windows\Options\Cabs but I like to give the directory the same name as the OS, e.g. C:\Windows\98se)

    Uninstall or otherwise disable (you can use msconfig) all device specific TSR's and other crap that loads at startup. This includes AntiVirus Software and firewalls. Remember to reenable later.

    Boot into safe mode and remove all devices from device manager. When done you'll be left with two entries, the child devices from the hard drive controller (assuming an IDE based system)

    Kill the Enum entry from the registry

    Rename autoexec.bat and config.sys

    Clear any entries in the load and run lines of win.ini

    Shut down, change out the mobo, power up, and go into your BIOS setup. Note the BIOS revision to ensure you have the most current version. Save your settings and reboot.

    If your BIOS isn't current, boot into safe mode command prompt only, flash your bios, reboot, recheck your bios settings, and then reboot normally. I always flash from the HDD as I've seen too many people get bit when a floppy disk or floppy drive die or encounter physical errors during a flash sequence. If you must use a floppy, be absolutely certain both the disk and drive are good before you start.

    If your BIOS is current, you can boot normally and you'll be presented with an error message about display adapter, at which point you can let Windows go to work and redetect everything.

    At this point, many will recommend you reboot every time Windows prompts you to, but I prefer to wait until all devices have been detected, and then before rebooting, open device manager, and delete the NON-SPLATTED entry (that's right I said the non-splatted) for all dupes. Common dupes will be Display Adapters, Keyboards, and DMA controllers. I also delete all Sound Card entries."

    Also:

    "It has been my experience that the deletion of files is unneeded with the improved Plug and Play function of Win98 thru WinME. You may simply install the Harddrive into the new case and start-up. The system will require several restarts as it sequentially installs first system resources, the PCI, then PCI peripherals and ISA, and finally ISA peripherals. The system will show a mix of drivers on the first couple of cycles but should finish with all appropriate drivers. Although the Windows install disks will have most common chipset drivers, you may need to supply uncommon chipset drivers."

    And:

    "I HAVE SWITCHED MOTHERBOARDS FROM CELERON SYSTEM TO AMD ATHLON SYSTEM AND THE WINDOWS DID EVERYTHING ITSELF. I SWITHCED THE HARD DRIVE FROM ONE SYSTEM TO THE OTHER AND WINDOWS DID THE DRIVERS CHANGES AUTOMATICALLY. JUST 2 TO 3 REBOOTINGS SO TO FIND EVERY CHANGE IN THE MAINBOARD AND THAT WAS IT. MAYBE IF YOU HAVE PROBLEMS INSTALL THE CD WITH THE MAINBOARD DRIVERS FROM THE WINDOWS SYSTEM, AND THAT'S IT!!! VERY EASY!!!"

    And:

    "I replaced my motherboard. I got a few tips on it. I just deleted everything out of the device manager (while in safe mode), except Plug and Play BIOS (which i wasn't sure about) then turned it off and swapped motherboards. Turning it on again it found everything new, and installed all the drivers and stuff, no hassles."


    Do you have a proven procedure that you can describe in detail, step-by-step? Thanks to all who contribute.
    Last edited by WildBlue; 12-14-2001 at 09:39 AM.
    MB: MSI K7T266 Pro2 (Bios 3.3)
    CPU: XP 1800+ (No OC; 32C - 36C)
    HSF: Swiftech MCX370-0A w/ ASII
    RAM: 2 Crucial 256 MB DDR, Non-ECC
    AGP: Colorgraphic Predator Pro 4 AGP (4-port)
    Sound: SB Live! Value
    NIC: Intel PRO/100+ Mgmt
    HDD 1: Maxtor DM+ D740X 40GB (ATA100)
    HDD 2: Maxtor DM+40 30GB (ATA66)
    Removable HDD Bay: CRU Dataport V+
    CD R/W: HP 9100i
    Case: A-Top AT900
    PS: Antec PP412X (400w)
    K/M: Logitech Cordless Desktop Pro
    Spkrs: Altec Lansing ACS-48
    Monitors: Samsung 950p (Four)
    OS: Windows 2000 Pro, SP3 +updates

  2. #2
    Joined
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Georgia, USA
    Posts
    2,516
    If the mobo has the same chipset, you may well be able to install your old HDD without any changes. If you are lucky.

    I've swapped out mobo's a few times, and find that deleting the ENUM key via REGEDIT works quite well. Saves a lot of time versus reformatting and reinstalling Windows.

  3. #3
    Joined
    Oct 2001
    Location
    U.S.A.
    Posts
    47
    A couple new ways:

    "Windows’ PnP relationship to the motherboard requires that you force Windows to redetect your chipset. In the past, I had seen advice that involved deleting a number of entries in your System control panel. Since then, however, I ran accross an even better method that somebody on Usenet suggested. Go to the Hardware Profiles tab in your System control panel, and create a second configuration. It doesn't really matter what you put in it. What is important is that on bootup, you'll be prompted for what configuration you want to use. Just choose None of the Above and Windows will redetect everything! Slick, eh? Of course, the motherboard upgrade is also the perfect time to reinstall your OS from scratch and make a clean start of it, but that can get old pretty fast."

    And:

    "I went in to Device Manager and removed all the cards and obvious things that would be changing. I powered down and replaced the Mobo, Power Supply, Sound card, and Video card all in one fell swoop. It booted back to windows just fine and after about a half a dozen reboot's for new drivers it was just fine. I recommend a fresh DirectX install after all is said and done. Have your new chipset drivers et al ready to go."

    And:

    "Running Win98 you can upgrade and keep existing install intact by booting off the Win98 CD first time you boot up with the new hardware, selecting "boot with CDrom Support" and then typing
    x: (where x is your CD drive letter)
    cd tools
    cd sysrec
    pcrestore
    great trick and works wonders."

    And:

    "For Win2k systems, it'll be a two step process with the second step definitely needed and the first step maybe needed.

    1. Boot to Win2k CD or 4 boot floppies to get to the recovery console to run fdisk/mbr or choose to rebuild the boot record in the menus? I don't recall the details on that one if it's a menu or just a command line prompt. Using the 4 boot floppies or CD's should just let you choose to repair the installation.

    2. Use SysPrep (1.1 is available on MS's website) to remove traces of information about your old hardware and force a redisccovery of all components.

    IIRC, the command at the recovery console is SYSPREP -PNP

    After the system boots and things are running, install the chipset drivers and all apropriate hardware device drivers."


    With six different methods, no standard recommended procedure is emerging here . . .
    MB: MSI K7T266 Pro2 (Bios 3.3)
    CPU: XP 1800+ (No OC; 32C - 36C)
    HSF: Swiftech MCX370-0A w/ ASII
    RAM: 2 Crucial 256 MB DDR, Non-ECC
    AGP: Colorgraphic Predator Pro 4 AGP (4-port)
    Sound: SB Live! Value
    NIC: Intel PRO/100+ Mgmt
    HDD 1: Maxtor DM+ D740X 40GB (ATA100)
    HDD 2: Maxtor DM+40 30GB (ATA66)
    Removable HDD Bay: CRU Dataport V+
    CD R/W: HP 9100i
    Case: A-Top AT900
    PS: Antec PP412X (400w)
    K/M: Logitech Cordless Desktop Pro
    Spkrs: Altec Lansing ACS-48
    Monitors: Samsung 950p (Four)
    OS: Windows 2000 Pro, SP3 +updates

  4. #4
    Joined
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Out there, just read my posts
    Posts
    5,473
    IMHO, there is NO hard/steadfast methodolgy for doing this, I have succeeded(sp?) twice:

    K7V - A7V: so far, so good: been about 1 month

    A7V133 - K7T266 Pro2-RU: so far, so good: been about 3 days.

    All I did was let 98SE redetect what it found, reinstalled the 4 in 1's, went into safe mode, and removed dup's in Device Manager.

    That's it.

    I'm probably just lucky in this arena.


  5. #5
    Joined
    May 2000
    Posts
    7,928
    WildBird,

    I understand what you are trying to do and why, but a fresh install is the bee's knees

    Besides, what else do us geeks have to do over the weekend?

    But on to your question:

    I have done it a few times with Win98 & Win98se, the most common problem that I have ran into is with onboard devices and getting I/O errors. I also remember an oddball videoerror, where the videocard card & driver appearred to be okay, but if I switch video resolution, I would get a black screen.

    But, I always went back in a relative short period of time and did a fresh install.

    I tried it with Win2000 once doing the safe mode boot, but got tired of the BSOD's and did a fresh install.

    Let us know how it all works out for ya


    Main Box: BioStar TpowerX58 LGA 1366, Intel i7 920 Nehalem 2.66GHz Quad-Core, 3GB Corsair DDR3 1600, 2X250GB WD SATA, VisionTek Radeon 4870, Corsair 620w PS, Asus DRW-1608P3S & DRW-1814BL, Win7 SP1 & LinuxMint 10

    Red Hour Video

    RedHour Gaming

  6. #6
    Joined
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Las Vegas, NV
    Posts
    77
    Using Windows XP Pro, I did a fresh install on a Soyo Dragon +. I then intstalled an MSI kt266a mobo. I then installed a Shuttle, then a Gigabyte, and back to MSI just for shits and giggles, and the system never had a hiccup. With every new board XP just reinstalled what it needed to and went from there. All apps worked fine. All boards used had the kt266a chipset.

  7. #7
    Joined
    Oct 2001
    Location
    U.S.A.
    Posts
    47
    Some repetition is emerging.

    New responses:

    "When I swap a MB in a Windows 98 or 2000 OS, I boot in safe mode and Delete enum out of the registry. Easy in 98, in 2000 goto HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\ControlSet002 and delete enum there. Then after installing the new board. Use the "Last known configuration” option that will cause it to use control set 2. Without any of the hardware detected. Detects it in 1 shot and 1 reboot."

    And:

    "This is a tip from PC Magazine for Win98. I don't know if it is applicable to W2K or XP.

    "Before you shut down the old motherboard for the last time, go into your Registry and delete HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Enum and everything under it. Then install the new MB and power up. Plug and Play will go out and look for all the new hardware and will leave your system properly configured for the new MB."

    And:

    "A common problem with Win2k on reboot after motherboard change: BSOD bearing the message "Inaccessible_boot_device". If you swap the board, say because the original goes bad, or to upgrade no matter what you switch to you will encounter this issue.

    This does not happen with windows 98 or windows me. With those you can take to hard drive out of one computer and stick in another and 99% it will boot and let you install the updated drivers without any complaint.

    Also with those OS's if you have to you can re-install right over the top of the existing install without losing data, or registry settings, as long as you use the exact same version as the original install. This will take care of that other 1% that didnt change smoothly the first time.

    I go through this with about 8 computers a week where I work. I work for a computer service company that does upgrades, hence the swap motherboard issue constanly creeping up...."

    And:

    "The "Inaccessible_boot_device" problem is caused by having changed the IDE controller. Here's how to get around it:

    1) Boot the PC system using the existing (previous) motherboard.
    **If you've installed the UltraATA Driver (if so, Device Manager->IDE Controllers->Primary Channel will be lacking its usual "Advanced Settings" tab) then uninstall said driver from Control Panel and reboot before continuing **
    2) From the Device Manager, open up the "IDE ATA/ATAPI Controllers" section. On a typical system there will be three entries under this - the controller itself, and then the primary/secondary IDE channels.
    3) Double-click on the entry for the controller, and change the driver to the generic Microsoft "Standard Dual-Channel PCI IDE Controller". This is to IDE controllers what the Standard VGA driver is to video cards - i.e., it'll work on just about anything, but is rather slow and basic.
    4) Now shut down the system, and replace the motherboard as required.
    5) As the new IDE controller is compatible with the "Standard Dual-Channel PCI IDE Controller" driver, then the system should, all being well, boot into Windows 2000.
    6) At this point you should install the optimised IDE/ATAPI drivers."

    And:

    "I changed mb's and got the message STOP 0x000000ED UNMOUNTABLE_BOOT_VOLUME. It is because XP is trying to access a drive controller that is not there. Boot of the CD choose repair, it will do a mini reinstall and keep your original settings."

    And:

    "To perform an upgrade leaving the existing OS in place:

    Boot from the Windows 2000 CD, or 4 boot floppies.

    Use F6 to install any required third-party drivers, and at the first screen asking you if you want to perform a repair of new install, answer with a new install.

    At the screen where (hopefully) Setup finds your current installation, and asks you if you want to repair it, answer that you want to repair it.

    All hardware will be redetected, but all other settings will be retained."

    And:

    “XP makes it easy. I've done a couple of board swaps on 2000 and XP. If you stick that drive in a board with a different chipset, it will probably blue screen shortly after starting to boot. Start the computer by booting off your WinXP CD-ROM. Choose to install Windows. Setup will detect your existing installation. Now choose to repair that installation. It will reinstall Windows but won't destroy your settings. Then install the drivers for the new board.”

    And:

    "Start a normal install from your CD. When the install program detects a valid w2k System on the HD it will ask you to install over it or to repair. Choose repair. All your programs and configurations will still exist after this repair."

    And:

    "Install the hard disk in your new system and boot off the Win2000 CD. Choose to install Windows. Don't take the recovery option. Setup will find your existing Windows 2000 installation, usually at c:\winnt. At this point, choose to repair that installation. Setup will reinstall but it won't mess with your programs and settings. When its done, you'll be able to install your chipset drivers, etc. I'd reapply SP2 just to be safe."

    And:

    "The last thing you can do with your old motherboard, is to go into REGEDIT and delete out HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Enum . When you re-start with your new motherboard, it should re-build the motherboard drivers. It also helps if Windows is on your harddrive (c:\windows\options\cabs) so that you don't even need to have your CDROM/DVDROM drive active upon the first re-boot.

    Doing a re-format and then a full re-install is a pain. I don't know about you, but the real problem is then re-installing all those applications; both finding all the disks for them and then then finding all the updates (the updates rarely have file names which seem obvious months or years later)." Agreed!!

    And:

    "Since the only thing at issue here is the OS drivers (mainly the PCI bus, disk controllers, USB, etc...), the easiest thing to do is to just uninstall all of your devices from device manager the last time you shut down your box before the new installation. When Windows restarts, it will not have any devices installed, so it will detect the new ones and install the drivers. This is the way techs have been doing it for years.

    Wiping your hard drive and starting over is totally unnecessary. Do this only if you enjoy re-installing Windows and all of your other software.

    It's amazing how many people will advocate and go through the process of wiping their hard drive when all that is needed to get their machine in top running condition again is to clean the left-over garbage out of their registry. There is a great little program in Windows (all flavors) called RegEdit. You can go in there and physically delete all the references to a rogue program in a couple minutes. (also: “Reg Repair 2000; This program is totally automatic. It cleaned up the registry just like a fresh install would".)"

    And:

    "A quick way, for WIN9x systems ONLY, is to load up regedit, then HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE and rename ENUM to RENUM or something like that (instead of just deleting it - this way you have a backup if needed). This does the same thing and is actually more reliable."

    Several comments regarding recognition of ATA100 found to this effect (when upgrade includes changing from an ATA66 to an ATA100 drive):

    "If your motherboard has a built-in u/dma-100 promise controller, you need to get the latest promise ata100 drivers from http://www.promise.com."


    So, I'm seeing some repetition, but procedures appear to vary depending on the OS; Win 98, 2000, or XP. For my purposes, it's Win2000. Looking for consensus and the prevailing method per OS.
    Last edited by WildBlue; 12-15-2001 at 07:38 PM.
    MB: MSI K7T266 Pro2 (Bios 3.3)
    CPU: XP 1800+ (No OC; 32C - 36C)
    HSF: Swiftech MCX370-0A w/ ASII
    RAM: 2 Crucial 256 MB DDR, Non-ECC
    AGP: Colorgraphic Predator Pro 4 AGP (4-port)
    Sound: SB Live! Value
    NIC: Intel PRO/100+ Mgmt
    HDD 1: Maxtor DM+ D740X 40GB (ATA100)
    HDD 2: Maxtor DM+40 30GB (ATA66)
    Removable HDD Bay: CRU Dataport V+
    CD R/W: HP 9100i
    Case: A-Top AT900
    PS: Antec PP412X (400w)
    K/M: Logitech Cordless Desktop Pro
    Spkrs: Altec Lansing ACS-48
    Monitors: Samsung 950p (Four)
    OS: Windows 2000 Pro, SP3 +updates

  8. #8
    Joined
    Oct 2001
    Location
    U.S.A.
    Posts
    47
    Here's a new one:

    "Piece of cake.....as long as you have the OS files safely on the hardrive. This prevents getting locked out in case of problems with controllers. You can do this by booting from a floppy and copy the files to a directory on the hardrive. Now, boot from the floppy, with CDROM support. Change to the directory where you put your OS files. (have any driver disks handy, for later when the OS asks) Use the Setup command but with the following changes.

    setup /ie /iv /im /is /IF /Pf

    This will pseudo reinstall windows...very quickly and usually without BSOD or lockups, and it will freshen the registry with the newly detected devices. It will also skip scandisk, diskspace detection, billboards, memory checks, as you know you have enough memory, etc.... It will also not copy files that already exisit, or are newer than the OS wants to install, (uses "cachefindfirst" ) and speeds up the installation. You can leave the /IF off if you want...it also turns off the verify after write during the install.

    Always works for me,,,,even going from VIA to BX to SIS and others."

    And:

    "Try this Microsoft Knowledge Base article - Q249694 “How to Move a Windows Installation to Different Hardware And Troubleshooting Windows 2000 Hardware Abstraction Layer Issues.”

    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;Q249694

    (Note: This procedure appears to be intended for moving an existing OS installation from one PC to another using two networked PCs (each having different hardware). It doesn’t appear to be for a single-PC hardware upgrade operation.)

    And:

    "I've transplanted several HD's onto new MB's, all with complete success! The most difficult was moving from an old AMD 400 socket 7 board to a new GA 7DXR (AMD 761 and Athlon 1.4Gig), with windows 2000! That one required running setup in safe mode to get around a stop message. At the end I was left with fully functioning setups which seemed optimized (As evidenced by several benchmarks!)"

    And: (another new one)

    "If you need to keep your existing OS settings etc., you can use the File and Settings Transfer Wizard and save them to a CD-R or a local hard drive on a network. Then after you have installed XP, transfer them back."

    And:

    After you move the Windows system (boot) disk to another computer with a different motherboard you may receive the following message when you try to startup:

    ***STOP: 0x0000007B (0xF741B84C,0xC0000034,0x00000000,0x00000000)
    INACCESSIBLE_BOOT_DEVICE

    The cause is that the registry entries and drivers for the new mass storage controller hardware are not installed in Windows.

    For IDE controllers, there are several different chip sets available. Each chip set uses a different Plug-n-Play (PNP) ID to identify it.

    The PNP-ID information of mass storage controllers for the backup computer must be in the registry prior to startup for Windows to initialize the correct drivers.
    For a solution see:

    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;Q271965

    And:

    "You'll need to reinstall Windows if you want SSE to be utilized (according to AMD). I believe that SSE is new to the AMD CPU's, only XP's have it."

    And:

    "I did this several months ago when I built up a new Athlon system, moving the hard drives from an Intel Celeron system. With Win2K, it was relatively easy.

    After moving the drives over to the new machine, Win2K would bluescreen. I booted from the Win2K CD, and began a re-install. At some point early on, it asked me if I wanted to "Repair" the current installation. I told it yes, and it essentially reinstalled itself over the old copy, keeping the System Registry entries that dealt with the installed software. When it was done, the system booted just fine, and everything was installed and working well."

    And:

    "Boot off the Win2000 CD. There is a repair option that doesn't require an ERD. I haven't done it enough to remember the exact procedure, but its somewhere in the Win2000 setup. It will delete hardware specific stuff, then reinstall Windows. Your data files and programs are unaffected. Once you get into Windows, immediately reapply SP2 and load drivers for the new hardware."

    And:

    "Boot from Win2K CD. But DO NOT choose repair option on 1st screen. Choose new install. System will detect your existing installation and will prompt to update it. It will keep your software settings, but it will update hardware drivers. You can reinstall windows over windows with no problems. It basically just skims over your existing installation and fixes bad files and fills in the blanks if something is missing. Everything will be the same after your reinstall."

    And:

    "Just run OS setup again. On the first request to repair existing answer "No" On second (when it will find existing OS) answer Yes. It will keep your software setting, but will redetect and update your hardware drivers, including controllers etc."


    A couple new procedures to "clarify" things. Also, hmm.. some for the 1st screen repair option; some for the 2nd screen install (find existing OS) option. Which is correct?

    When upgrading to an XP processor, would SSE be enabled when updating the existing OS installation using either the repair or install (find existing OS) option?
    MB: MSI K7T266 Pro2 (Bios 3.3)
    CPU: XP 1800+ (No OC; 32C - 36C)
    HSF: Swiftech MCX370-0A w/ ASII
    RAM: 2 Crucial 256 MB DDR, Non-ECC
    AGP: Colorgraphic Predator Pro 4 AGP (4-port)
    Sound: SB Live! Value
    NIC: Intel PRO/100+ Mgmt
    HDD 1: Maxtor DM+ D740X 40GB (ATA100)
    HDD 2: Maxtor DM+40 30GB (ATA66)
    Removable HDD Bay: CRU Dataport V+
    CD R/W: HP 9100i
    Case: A-Top AT900
    PS: Antec PP412X (400w)
    K/M: Logitech Cordless Desktop Pro
    Spkrs: Altec Lansing ACS-48
    Monitors: Samsung 950p (Four)
    OS: Windows 2000 Pro, SP3 +updates

  9. #9
    Joined
    Dec 2001
    Location
    california
    Age
    43
    Posts
    13
    Thanks a million for this thread, I'm going to -eeeny meeeny miiiney moe- one of these methods, and give it a try, I'll post my chosen method, and the results after one week of operation (fingers crossed).
    I just bought a K7T266 RU board and an athlon 1.4 T-bird for my moms computer, she is very peculiar about all of her programs, and she has a LOT. I dont anticipate smootheness, but one thing is for sure, this thread has helped, and helped ALOT.

    This forum is great, special props to Mr. Steveo, very nice person!


    Yak

  10. #10
    Joined
    Oct 2001
    Location
    U.S.A.
    Posts
    47
    Yak, glad you're finding this helpful. Results are still in the disorganized stage here, but I see a usable guide in the making (thanks to all contributors).


    RE: " . . . some for the 1st screen repair option; some for the 2nd screen install (find existing OS) option. Which is correct?"

    From a Microsoft XP tech re. an XP install:

    "Boot the system from the XP CD. Have your CDKEY ready. Select the install option (Don't select repair!). Setup will find the install of XP that is already there and ask if you wish to repair it. Say yes. Setup will run the upgrade code that will re-enumerate the hardware and set itself to boot from the new controller.

    BTW, the first repair option only verifies XP files against the XP CD versions and makes no system setting changes."

    I am guessing that this is the difference between the two options in Win2000 as well . . .
    Last edited by WildBlue; 12-16-2001 at 01:52 AM.
    MB: MSI K7T266 Pro2 (Bios 3.3)
    CPU: XP 1800+ (No OC; 32C - 36C)
    HSF: Swiftech MCX370-0A w/ ASII
    RAM: 2 Crucial 256 MB DDR, Non-ECC
    AGP: Colorgraphic Predator Pro 4 AGP (4-port)
    Sound: SB Live! Value
    NIC: Intel PRO/100+ Mgmt
    HDD 1: Maxtor DM+ D740X 40GB (ATA100)
    HDD 2: Maxtor DM+40 30GB (ATA66)
    Removable HDD Bay: CRU Dataport V+
    CD R/W: HP 9100i
    Case: A-Top AT900
    PS: Antec PP412X (400w)
    K/M: Logitech Cordless Desktop Pro
    Spkrs: Altec Lansing ACS-48
    Monitors: Samsung 950p (Four)
    OS: Windows 2000 Pro, SP3 +updates

  11. #11
    Joined
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Georgia, USA
    Posts
    2,516
    WildBlue,
    This is an interesting and helpful thread. Have you considered organizing it all and making a FAQ out of it? It would be nice to have it in one permanent place.

  12. #12
    Joined
    Oct 2001
    Location
    U.S.A.
    Posts
    47
    vlavigne,
    The plan is to get to a final "How-To" based entirely on posted contributions and whatever else I can dig up, then post the final here. I'm not technically qualified on the subject, so it's a little difficult sorting all this out. There's multiple methods and many contradictions. For something real authoritative like a FAQ, a true Windows expert really needs to review the work. (Any takers?)

    What I'm doing now is collecting information, organizing it, distilling it, and moving toward a final doc that's easily readable. Maybe this will develop into a permanent resource here or elsewhere. I think it would help a lot of people. "Official" sources (Microsoft support documents) are pretty much silent on the subject.
    MB: MSI K7T266 Pro2 (Bios 3.3)
    CPU: XP 1800+ (No OC; 32C - 36C)
    HSF: Swiftech MCX370-0A w/ ASII
    RAM: 2 Crucial 256 MB DDR, Non-ECC
    AGP: Colorgraphic Predator Pro 4 AGP (4-port)
    Sound: SB Live! Value
    NIC: Intel PRO/100+ Mgmt
    HDD 1: Maxtor DM+ D740X 40GB (ATA100)
    HDD 2: Maxtor DM+40 30GB (ATA66)
    Removable HDD Bay: CRU Dataport V+
    CD R/W: HP 9100i
    Case: A-Top AT900
    PS: Antec PP412X (400w)
    K/M: Logitech Cordless Desktop Pro
    Spkrs: Altec Lansing ACS-48
    Monitors: Samsung 950p (Four)
    OS: Windows 2000 Pro, SP3 +updates

  13. #13
    Joined
    Oct 2001
    Location
    U.S.A.
    Posts
    47
    More results:

    “Yep you can do the "upgrade", here's what you do.
    1. Create an image of the partition you wanna upgrade - Ghost works fine for this.
    2. Boot Win2K to that partition.
    3. Insert your Win2K CD.
    4. Choose "Upgrade" from the Win2K menu. (First choose to Install Windows 2000. It'll give you the option to "Upgrade" your existing Windows (even though it's already Win2000) on the next screens).
    5. When the system first goes to reboot, power it down.
    6. Remove old components and add new ones.
    7. Power the system back up.
    8. Continue normally with the "Upgrade".”

    And:

    “What you want to do was easy under NT, a little more involved under W98 and much harder under Win2000. There is a very good chance that Win2000 will fail during the boot stage with the infamous "Inaccessible Boot Device" error. If this happens you could try this:
    1. Get a copy of DriveImage from PowerQuest
    2. Create an image file of your Win2000 installation
    3. Run sysprep (Win2000 Resource Kit)
    4. Make your physical changes
    5. Run up Win2000 and let it sort things out

    If all fails then you can restore your original installation from the image file you created in Step 2.”

    Response re. SYSPREP:
    I DON'T think this is what you want. Sysprep will remove much user and network information from the machine (unfortunately, doesn't seem to do this completely when you need it to), and also the product ID, so that you have to re-enter all of this stuff. It will not help with problems caused by changes in the hardware.
    http://www.microsoft.com/technet/win...rv/sysprep.asp

    And:

    “RE: I changed motherboards (Pentium to Athlon), and when I tried to reboot windows 2000, it gave me the following error:

    STOP: 0x0000007B (0xED41F84C, 0xC0000034, 0x00000000,
    0x00000000 ) INACCESSABLE_BOOT_DEVICE.

    Microsoft tech says: Try reinstalling win2k as an upgrade. (Boot the CD, or boot the setup floppy disks, or run Setup.exe on the CD from explorer.) This should reconfigure Win2k to work with your new hardware, while preserving your settings. (I bet the HALs are different and that's what’s giving you problems.)

    Another says: Win2k doesn't have I/O disk controller drivers for your motherboard - you'll have to supply them during the white text on blue screen portion of Win2k's setup (by pressing <F6> and having a floppy disk in drive A: with the drivers on it). You can copy these from the motherboard install CD, or download them from the vendor's web site, then copy to CD. After this, things should be OK.

    Another: When installing W2K press F6 when it asks for additional adapter drivers; load the controller drivers off floppy; continue with install. Unlike w98, w2k won't treat the ATA100 channels as a regular IDE channel. It's just a driver issue...

    Another: The error means that Windows 2000 setup can't find your drive controller and or the driver for it. You'll need to *F6* very early and very important (at setup is inspecting your system) in the setup to prevent drive controller detection, and select S to specify additional drivers. Then later you'll be prompted to insert the Windows 2000 driver for your drive controller in drive "A" Or check the boot device settings in cmos setup, also check your drive/ drive controller cable connections.”

    Another: Win2K can cope with most hardware changes (by running the Found New Hardware wizard, again and again and again..) but only if it can boot as far as the GUI desktop in the first place. And one of the few device changes that might prevent that is a change to the hard disk controller. There are two (well, three actually, but you won't like the third..) ways around this:

    1) If the original PC can still run, then re-install the hard disk in it. It *should* boot successfully into Windows 2000. Then go to the Device Manager and open up the "IDE ATA/ATAPI Controllers" section. On a typical system there will be three entries under this – the controller itself, and then the primary + secondary IDE channels. Double-click on the entry for the controller, and change the driver to the generic Microsoft "Standard Dual-Channel PCI IDE Controller". Shut down the system. Now you can put the disk back into the new system – it should boot OK, as the "generic" driver is compatible with most IDE controllers out there - albeit at lower performance. Once booted, install the correct driver for your IDE controller.

    2) If the old PC is trashed and cannot run, then provided that the disk has not been encrypted, you can install it in the new system as a slave. Install another hard disk as Master, then install Win2K afresh on the new disk. Once installed, you should be able to access the old disk as drive "D:" and pull off any data that you need.

    3) Err.. the third method is to reinstall Windows. Told you you wouldn't like it...!”

    And:

    "If it's the same model motherboard, just shutdown, replace the board, and restart. You may find you need to rebind the NICs.

    If it's different hardware, MS has designed a simple process for this, even though it probably sounds pretty bold. You can migrate a W2K installation to a new machine by building the new machine, installing a scratch copy of the W2K OS on a clean drive partition, then doing a W2K Backup restore of the previous system. W2K Backup will replace everything other than the hardware specific stuff. To pursue this idea, you would first make a full backup of the original drive partition, probably by doing a backup to disk (on a different partition). Next you wipe the system partition on the drive during a scratch install of the OS, and place the OS in the very same location (c:\winnt.sbs or whatever). Once done, make an ERD, then do a restore of the backup of the previous system."

    And:

    "I have done this many times with various board swaps here is how to do it best. Here are the instructions for removing all hardware references in Windows 95/98. This allows for a full hardware upgrade without reinstalling all software.

    1- Backup the current registry.

    2- Make sure that the Startup Disk can access the CD-ROM, or copy the contents of the Windows setup folder from the setup disk to the hard drive (Recommended).

    3- Boot into Safe Mode

    4- From the file manager rename the following folders.

    \Windows\Inf to \InfOLD
    \Windows\System\IOSudSys to \IOSudSysOLD
    \Windows\System\VMM32 to \VMM32OLD

    5- From the Start Menu run REGEDIT and delete the following registry keys.

    HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\VxD (Usually empty)
    HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\Class (Usually empty)
    HKLM\Enum (This may cause the system to stop responding, so do it last)

    6- Boot the system with a Startup Disk and run the Windows 95/98 Setup or boot with the system with the Safe Mode Command Prompt Only option and run Setup from the folder you copied the setup file to.

    7- Reinstall any Windows updates needed.

    8- Install all hardware drivers."

    And:

    "To Transfer An Existing Installation Of Windows* 2000 To A New Motherboard:

    Scenario: On occasion, the user may wish to exchange the mainboard of a computer system running Windows 2000. Unless the replacement is identical to the original, a STOP (Blue Screen) error INACESSIBLE_BOOT_DEVICE will be observed when attempting to boot the existing disk image on the new board. This is caused by the presence of a mass storage controller on the new board that is incompatible with that on the previous motherboard. In most cases, this scenario will require a re-installation of Windows 2000; however, there are instances where this is not necessary, if the following conditions are met:

    1) The Mass Storage Controller on both the old and new boards are standard onboard ATA/IDE PCI devices, as commonly found on many desktop system boards.
    2) Neither controller uses RAID functionality.
    3) It is still possible to boot Windows 2000 on the previous motherboard.

    If these conditions are met, then the user may wish to try the following procedure.

    1) Boot the PC system using the existing (previous) motherboard
    2) From the Device Manager, open up the "IDE ATA/ATAPI Controllers" section. On a typical system there will be three entries under this - the controller itself, and then the primary secondary IDE channels.
    3) Double-click on the entry for the controller, and change the driver to the generic Microsoft "Standard Dual-Channel PCI IDE Controller".
    4) Now shut down the system, and replace the motherboard as required.
    5) If the new IDE controller is compatible with the "Standard Dual-Channel PCI IDE Controller" driver, then the system should boot into Windows 2000.
    6) At this point you should install any optimized IDE/ATAPI drivers provided by your system vendor."

    And:

    "I've changed 10+ boards (even from Intel to AMD boards) without reinstalling the OS, this is how:

    From within windows 2000 (this is important!! - and this is why you have to start on the old board, before you change boards...) put the Windows 2000 CD in and start the Windows 2000 setup - choose upgrade curent version of windows! (usefull if you have a SR2 slipstreamed version of Windows 2000).

    Let the upgrade begin. On the first power down, switch off the computer, and swap any hardware you want. Turn on the computer and let the upgrade continue. Once the upgrade is finished, you are up and running. You have to install SR2 if you haven't got the slipstreamed CD. And any devices you had upgraded needs to be upgraded again. But no software or windows settings have changed. Beats a clean installation.

    You could also try to look into SYSPREP - I've never used it, but it should be able to prepare the system for a system change."
    MB: MSI K7T266 Pro2 (Bios 3.3)
    CPU: XP 1800+ (No OC; 32C - 36C)
    HSF: Swiftech MCX370-0A w/ ASII
    RAM: 2 Crucial 256 MB DDR, Non-ECC
    AGP: Colorgraphic Predator Pro 4 AGP (4-port)
    Sound: SB Live! Value
    NIC: Intel PRO/100+ Mgmt
    HDD 1: Maxtor DM+ D740X 40GB (ATA100)
    HDD 2: Maxtor DM+40 30GB (ATA66)
    Removable HDD Bay: CRU Dataport V+
    CD R/W: HP 9100i
    Case: A-Top AT900
    PS: Antec PP412X (400w)
    K/M: Logitech Cordless Desktop Pro
    Spkrs: Altec Lansing ACS-48
    Monitors: Samsung 950p (Four)
    OS: Windows 2000 Pro, SP3 +updates

  14. #14
    Joined
    Oct 2001
    Location
    U.S.A.
    Posts
    47
    Recommended procedures vary depending on the operating system. Methods that work for Win98 aren't recommended for Win2K or XP, some respondents say.

    More results:

    “Fast way to remove devices from device manager: Open regedit, browse to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Enum. Remove all entries (just delete the enum key, Windows will make another one). Reboot. I have only tried it once and it worked like a charm. I just removed the whole key "enum". When windows rebooted only "computer" showed up in device manager. I went to control panel and clicked on "add new hardware" and let windows sort thru everything again.”

    And:

    “I've had to do this a lot recently - and here's a few tips.

    Before starting, make sure the Windows "cab" files are on the hard drive, plus any drivers that are not included with Windows (video, sound, modem, etc.) and expand them into a folder if appropriate. (It goes easier if you copy the Windows cabs to the hard drive first (if they are not already there), along with any specific drivers you need, because you will not have CD drive access until you reboot a few times - the IDE controllers are going to have to be reinstalled).

    You can just delete the whole "enum" key. When you reboot, absolutely nothing will be found by itself. It will be in 640x480 16 color, and give you a display properties error. Cancel and close that and go to "add new hardware" and let it search. Reboot when prompted (this will happen several times) until you no longer get the prompts. If it prompts you to insert the Windows CD, point it to the cab files. If it asks for a manufacturer's driver disk, point it to the appropriate folder. Don't worry if a driver install fails, you can always go back later and reinstall that particular device from scratch. If you have a VIA based board, now is the time to install the "4 in 1" drivers.

    Now, go into device manager. You will probably have some yellow flags. You will probably have 2 items that are flagged with unflagged duplicates - the keyboard and the DMA controller. Remove the entry that is NOT flagged. If you have 2 display adapters, one will be flagged - usually the "standard VGA" will not be flagged and the actual adapter will be flagged. Remove the unflagged standard VGA. By now you should have CD support, so any other devices that are flagged can be reinstalled using the appropriate CD if necessary.
    This procedure is intended for use with 95/98/ME. You can't really follow this procedure with Win2K. Removing the ENUM key is NOT recommended for a NT-based OS such as 2000 or XP - a reinstall is the best recommendation here unless someone else has a better idea. Win2K handles hardware enumeration differently.”

    And:

    Before you delete the ENUM key, while the hard drive is still running on the old motherboard, do this just in case you want to reinstall the hard drive back on to the old motherboard (if you are moving the drive permanently, this is not needed, just delete the enum key and have at it):

    STEP 1. We assume that your hard drive is still sitting in your OLD computer ..

    STEP 2. Click on My Computer there select VIEW > FOLDER OPTION >VIEW then there enable "SHOW ALL FILES" Close this Windows when done

    STEP 3. Change the folder to WINDOWS\SYSBCKUP

    STEP 4.On the Explorer bar click VIEW again and select VIEW DETAILS and then click on TYPE - this will arrange all files found in there by the Type of the file..

    STEP 5.Look out for RB***.CAB when found then use SHIFT and select the first = RB000.CAB - and the last = RB005.CAB and then right click on it and DELETE - still holding the shift Button - this will DELETE the files out of the System.

    STEP 6.Leave the My Computer Window open and go to START > RUN and type
    SCANREGW and press enter if asked if you like to BACKUP the REGISTRY answer with Y or yes or OK.!!

    STEP 7. Go back to the My Computer window which still is open and there somewhere of your CHOICE create an NEW FOLDER and Name it OLDMOBO..

    STEP 8.Now again go to the SYSBACKUP folder and find RB000.CAB right click this file and select COPY - then go over to your newly created OLDMOBO and paste the file in there. RENAME the file to OLDMOBO.CAB

    Sofar you are finished and ready to delete ENUM and move the hard drive to the NEW board as a PRIMARY MASTER. If you want to move the drive as a PRIMARY SLAVE or SECONDARY MASTER or SLAVE then all this doesn't need to be done, including deletion of ENUM!

    Shut down the computer and then switch the drive to the other computer or switch the board whatever.. -

    Now the most important thing is that while switching boards, the hard ware on the board itself isn't the same so the registry of Windows which is running on either one isn't THE SAME

    That's why - Whenever you like to move the drive from the NEW board after you have sucessfully swtiched the boards, back to the OLD BOARD then RENAME the RB000.CAB created on the NEW BOARD to NEWMOBO.CAB and copy it to the folder OLDMOBO

    Assume you switched the drive or the board and RIGHT NOW you are using the NEW BOARD but for what ever reason you would like to get the DIRVE BACK to work on the OLD board - so that you don't have to go through all the procedure again, all you need to do is just to RESTORE THE REGISTRY FILE OLDMOBO.CAB by copy this file into C:\WINDOWS\SYSBCKUP\OLDMOBO.CAB then booting to the MS-DOS prompt and RESTORING the file OLDMOBO.CAB and this after the drive has been swapped to the OLD computer but NOT has been BOOTED UP to WINDOWS yet this will allow you to Switch board or Hard drive within a few minutes without to go through all the installation procedures anymore.. Sounds confusing, but is in fact a very easy task..”

    And:

    I've been using the "delete ENUM" trick a lot in the past month, and I have worked out some procedures, the best of all being this. If you found you have made a mistake deleting ENUM you can get it back just like it was by restoring a previous booting copy of the registry. Use the command "scanreg /restore" and use the last previous registry that booted the machine. Enum will be back. I made a mistake and deleted the wrong machine yesterday and this restored it.

    And:

    “For Win98: You do need to tell windows to go out and find all the hardware all over again, but you don't necessarily need to reinstall windows to do so.

    An important first step will make the change easier if you're going to switch your graphics adapter at the same time: Be sure to change your graphics adapter driver to Standard VGA before you shut down the old motherboard for the last time. This will save you grief from the computer trying to use the wrong driver for the new PC Card when you start up.

    Before you shut down the old motherboard for the last time, go into your Registry and delete HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Enum and everything under it. Then install the new motherboard and power up. Plug and Play will go out and look for all the hardware and will leave your system properly configured for the new motherboard.”

    And:

    “Here's how I would do it. Dunno if it helps now, but here goes.

    Delete all devices in Device Manager
    Turn computer off, do your swithcing
    Boot from Win2k CD and re-install
    On first reboot put all your drivers and such back in

    I don't believe there is any reason to wipe your drive, but whenever I change out one motherboard for a different brand/model, I do this, and it seems to work.”

    And:

    Re: message:"inaccessible_boot_device". The problem is that Win2k doesn't find your IDE or SCSI controller. You must push the F6 button very early at the beginning of the installation (It's a blue screen/at the bottom) . you will need the correct drivers for you controller. win2k searches for txtsetup.oem. download the drivers from the internet and you will have no problems; at least not this problem anymore . You would get that file, and the others you need, from the motherboard manufacturer's web site.”

    And:

    “The proper way to change out a motherboard is to launch an in-place upgrade, and use the F6 option to install new disk controller drivers.

    Q216406 Specifying Third-Party Disk Controller Driver During Setup http://support.microsoft.com/support.../q216/4/06.asp

    Specifying a third-party controller driver during Setup should be necessary only if Windows 2000 does not contain a driver for your SCSI adapter, CD-ROM drive, or special disk controller, or if Setup does not detect your hardware correctly. To select a third-party controller during Setup:
    1. During the first phase of Setup, at the "Setup is inspecting your computer's hardware configuration" screen, press the F6 key.
    2. Press S to specify an additional driver. You are prompted for the manufacturer-supplied disk.
    3. After all additional drivers have been specified, press ENTER to continue with Setup.”

    And:

    “For the OS to talk properly to new hardware it needs a driver. For ATA100, you MUST load the ATA100 driver during the W2K install by hitting f6 when it is looking at the hardware.

    Follow Up: You do not need to install the ATA-100 driver during the WIN2K install process on a non-RAID IDE motherboard. WIN2K will simply treat it as an ATA-66 drive. Now, if the disk were on a SCSI or RAID controller, that would be a different story. I have an ABIT KG7, and when 2K is clean installed, it simply see's it as a ATA-66 drive. Once the install is complete, I install SRP2, and WIN2K see's it as a ATA-100 drive. I also have a ABIT KT7-RAID with the HD on IDE3. Because IDE3 is on the HighPoint RAID controller, I must use the 3rd party mass-storage device (F6) option, or WIN2K doesn't see the disk.”


    For those using this thread to assist a motherboard change, could you post your results? What procedure did you follow? What operating system and hardware?
    MB: MSI K7T266 Pro2 (Bios 3.3)
    CPU: XP 1800+ (No OC; 32C - 36C)
    HSF: Swiftech MCX370-0A w/ ASII
    RAM: 2 Crucial 256 MB DDR, Non-ECC
    AGP: Colorgraphic Predator Pro 4 AGP (4-port)
    Sound: SB Live! Value
    NIC: Intel PRO/100+ Mgmt
    HDD 1: Maxtor DM+ D740X 40GB (ATA100)
    HDD 2: Maxtor DM+40 30GB (ATA66)
    Removable HDD Bay: CRU Dataport V+
    CD R/W: HP 9100i
    Case: A-Top AT900
    PS: Antec PP412X (400w)
    K/M: Logitech Cordless Desktop Pro
    Spkrs: Altec Lansing ACS-48
    Monitors: Samsung 950p (Four)
    OS: Windows 2000 Pro, SP3 +updates

  15. #15
    Joined
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    236
    Not sure if this was mentioned allready.

    I wanted to change from a Asus Raid using highpoint controller to a Epox with a promise controller in Win2000.

    I got the dreded Win2000 fail during the boot stage with the infamous "Inaccessible Boot Device" error

    To fix this while in the Asus setup, I uninstalled the Highpoint drivers & did NOT reboot.
    Then I installed the latestest promise drivers which it complained but let me do it anyway.

    Then shutdown windows. Moved both drives with raid 0 to the new controller.
    Started up & it loaded to Windows 2000 without any reinstalls, repairs, syspreps etc.
    I did delete alot of the other Harware devices I thought might cause me a problem first while on the asus which in turn got redetected.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •